Course Offerings

African American Studies XB98—Homegrown Hip Hop (2 Units)
Department: 
Electives
Department Abbreviation: 
XAFRICAM
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
This course is an elective.
Course Description: 

From its inception, Hip Hop has been (and continues to be) more than just a genre of music. Hip Hop has always served as an umbrella term encompassing art, music, dance, literature, identity, style, entrepreneurship and politics. This course will utilize an interactive and multi-media approach to engaging with Hip Hop Culture in the Bay Area. As the course will deal with contemporary Hip Hop culture in the Bay Area, it will also focus on the regional influences underpinning the Bay Area's distinct Hip-Hop landscape. We will also make it a point to deconstruct the multiple eras of Hip-Hop/rap in the Bay Area, and critically appraise the content contained in Bay Area Hip Hop records. It bears repeating, Hip-Hop culture is not only a source of entertainment within our everyday lives, but also a medium that analyzes/provides commentary regarding social, economic, political and cultural issues dealing with cultural identity, cultural genocide, misogyny, racism, classism, materialism, freedom of speech and freedom of sexuality. During the duration of this semester we will think critically, embrace debate, and delve into the study of Hip Hop culture. 

Anthropology XB1—Introduction to Biological Anthropology (4 units)
Department: 
Biological Science
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XANTHRO
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Either the Biological Science or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

This course will provide the student with an introduction to the discipline of anthropological archaeology with a special emphasis on how archaeology contributes to our understanding of American society and the cultures from which it is drawn. Students will learn about the methods, goals, and theoretical concepts of archaeology with attention to the impact archaeology has had on the construction of the histories of diverse communities−Native Americans, African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos, and European Americans. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Anthropology XB2AC—Introduction to Archaeology (4 Units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XANTHRO
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the HIstorical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade.
Course Description: 

Gain an introduction to the discipline of anthropological archaeology with a special emphasis on how archaeology contributes to our understanding of American society and the cultures from which it is drawn. You will learn about the methods, goals and theoretical concepts of archaeology, with attention to the impact archaeology has had on the construction of the histories of diverse communities, such as Native Americans, African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos and European Americans. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Art XB98—Symbolic and Practical: Art and Social Justice (2 Units)
Department: 
Electives
Department Abbreviation: 
XART
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Electives do not fulfill University or breadth requirements, but are great opportunities to enrich your schedule in areas you find interesting.
Course Description: 

Artists have long made works that address issues of justice, equity, freedom and oppression. These works, and the strategies artists employ, are frequently informed by, produced through or in dialogue with social movements that seek to alter the conditions of society. The relationship between art and social movements raises questions about what it means to do art and what it means to do social justice. In order to explore the overlaps, tensions, and distinctions between the symbolic and practical practices of artists and social movements, this course combines student experimentation, readings, videos, discussion and site visits throughout the San Francisco Bay Area.

Art XB98—Visits & Observations: Investigating Bay Area Art (2 Units)
Department: 
Electives
Department Abbreviation: 
XART
Prerequisite: 

None

Course Description: 

Through instruction, structured visits to museums, art galleries, and artist studios, observational journal assignments, group discussion, individualized projects and group critiques, students will learn to visually respond to the world around them. This will occur in transit to locations, the locations themselves, and in the studio. Using their visual journals to track their thought processes during our visits students will learn to observe and respond to a variety of visual sources. These observations will be the catalyst for individualized studio projects that will occur a week after our visits. Students will question the boundaries of where an artistic experience begins and ends while learning where art and inspiration might exist within their community and direct surroundings and how to apply that to their own artistic vision.

Asian American Studies XB20A—Introduction to the History of Asians in the United States (4 units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XASAMST
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Either the Historical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Examine critical aspects of Asian-American histories and experiences from 1848 to the present. Gain a historical framework for a basic understanding of the experiences of the major Asian-American groups and an analytical foundation for comparative analyses. You will understand national and international factors that have an impact on migration and related policies; intersecting issues of race, class and gender relations; interclass conflicts between labor and capital; and intraclass conflicts as evidenced by labor agitation against Asian migration and resettlement. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Astronomy XB10—Introduction to General Astronomy (4 units)
Department: 
Physical Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XASTRON
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Physical Science breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Cover modern astronomy with an emphasis on the structure and evolution of stars, galaxies and the universe. Additional topics optionally discussed include quasars, pulsars, black holes and extraterrestrial communications. A minimum of high school–level algebra and geometry is assumed, but equation solving and memorization are not emphasized. Most students are not physical science majors, and the emphasis is on understanding the skills used in astrophysics that are of interest to society. Students receive no credit for Astronomy 10 after taking Astronomy 7A or 7B. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Classics XB10A—Introduction to Greek Civilization (4 units)
Department: 
Arts and Literature
Historical Studies
Philosophy and Values
Department Abbreviation: 
XCLASSI
Prerequisite: 

None; however, this is a writing- and reading-intensive course, and your writing skills should exceed the College Writing course level

Satisfies: 
Either the Arts and Literature, Historical Studies, or Philosophy and Values breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Get an introductory survey of Greek civilization from the Bronze Age to 4th-century B.C.E. ancient Greece. One of several civilizations of the ancient Mediterranean, Greek civilization has had an enduring influence on many areas of Western thought and culture, and its surviving literature includes several works that continue to stand among the world's most significant. The study of this culture, in both its similarities and differences with our own, helps us understand contemporary individual and societal conflict. You read and discuss works of several different types of literature, including epic poetry, lyric poetry, tragedy, comedy, history and philosophy. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

College Writing XBR1A—Accelerated Reading and Composition: Berkeley Campus (6 units)
Enroll: 
first-half of R&C and ELWR
Department Abbreviation: 
XCOLWRI
Prerequisite: 

Only for students who have not passed the UC Analytical Writing Placement Exam or have not satisfied the Entry-Level Writing requirement. 

Satisfies: 
Both the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement and the first-half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

This is an intensive and accelerated composition course. Readings include imaginative, expository and argumentative texts representing the range of those encountered in the undergraduate curriculum. Read from authors with diverse social and cultural backgrounds and perspectives. Instruction covers many types of writing and revising papers. Six hours of class per week.

Sections 
College Writing R1A-1
Topic: TBA

Instructor: TBA

 

College Writing R1A-2, R1A-4
The Iceberg of Culture

Instructor: TBA

With the rise of neo-nationalism, as seen in Brexit and in America’s 2016 election, cross-cultural understanding is more important than ever. Plus, it’s fascinating! We’ll explore Geert Hofstede’s Model of Cultures (developed from IBM employee surveys) and recent responses to it by Brendan McSweeney and others. We’ll look at the Culture Compass smart phone app and ask what Hofstede’s Cultural Dimensions Theory can teach us about cultures that differ from our own. We’ll read amazing fiction that can help us “overcome identity politics,” as novelist Elif Shafak observes, and we’ll watch TED talks and riveting documentaries that can help us see where our own cultural biases lie. In short, we’ll expand our worlds as we write excellent papers, too.

College Writing R1A-3
Witness and Testimony

Instructor: Spanbock

 

Understanding subjectivity is an essential part of the writing process. When we express ourselves, make an argument, or tell a story, we do so from a position shaped by who we are and where we are, our background and experiences, our thoughts and beliefs, and even how we are feeling in that moment. Subjectivity also plays a foundational role in how we understand and interpret others and the world around us. It shapes our opinions and makes us unique. This class asks students to consider subjectivity through two distinct but related paradigms: witnessing, an act of seeing or otherwise experiencing an event, and testimony, an act of self-expression meant to share or convey opinions on what has been witnessed. The purpose of this class is to introduce practical methods for reading “texts” (print, visual, auditory, social, etc.) and to activate both thought and writing processes to engage with the dynamic issues they raise. Together, we will examine a number of short and long texts that draw from and speak to discourses from across the academic disciplines and raise questions concerning subjectivity in acts of witness and testimony.  We will also explore different techniques for self-expression and different types of writing with a goal of better understanding our own subject positions, as well as those we encounter. Operating under the premise that our community stands to benefit from a diversity of perspectives and opinions, this class will have a specific emphasis on LOCAL instances of witness and testimony in and around the Bay Area.

 

 

 

College Writing XBR1A—Accelerated Reading and Composition: San Francisco Campus (6 units)
Enroll: 
first-half of R&C and ELWR
Department Abbreviation: 
XCOLWRI
Prerequisite: 

Placement by the UC Analytical Writing Placement Exam. This course is only for students who did not pass the AWPE and have not otherwise satisfied Entry-Level Writing with SAT, ACT, or AP/IB exam scores. 

Satisfies: 
Both the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement and the first-half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

This is an intensive and accelerated composition course. Readings include imaginative, expository and argumentative texts representing the range of those encountered in the undergraduate curriculum. Read from authors with diverse social and cultural backgrounds and perspectives. Instruction covers many types of writing and revising papers. Six hours of class per week.

Section
College Writing R1A-5
Witness and Testimony

Instructor: Spanbock

 

Understanding subjectivity is an essential part of the writing process. When we express ourselves, make an argument, or tell a story, we do so from a position shaped by who we are and where we are, our background and experiences, our thoughts and beliefs, and even how we are feeling in that moment. Subjectivity also plays a foundational role in how we understand and interpret others and the world around us. It shapes our opinions and makes us unique. This class asks students to consider subjectivity through two distinct but related paradigms: witnessing, an act of seeing or otherwise experiencing an event, and testimony, an act of self-expression meant to share or convey opinions on what has been witnessed. The purpose of this class is to introduce practical methods for reading “texts” (print, visual, auditory, social, etc.) and to activate both thought and writing processes to engage with the dynamic issues they raise. Together, we will examine a number of short and long texts that draw from and speak to discourses from across the academic disciplines and raise questions concerning subjectivity in acts of witness and testimony.  We will also explore different techniques for self-expression and different types of writing with a goal of better understanding our own subject positions, as well as those we encounter. Operating under the premise that our community stands to benefit from a diversity of perspectives and opinions, this class will have a specific emphasis on LOCAL instances of witness and testimony in and around the Bay Area.

Comparative Literature XBR1A—English Composition in Connection With the Reading of World Literature (4 units)
Enroll: 
first-half of R&C
Department Abbreviation: 
TBD
Prerequisite: 

Completion of the UC Entry Level Writing Requirement or UC Analytical Writing Placement Exam

Satisfies: 
The first-half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better.
Course Description: 

Gain instruction in expository writing based on analysis of selected masterpieces of ancient and modern literature. You will come to understand the readings through class discussion and writing and revising papers that analyze the readings in academic argument form. Learn to read and write at the analytical and critical levels required at the University of California. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections
Comparative Literature R1A-1
Lost & Found in the American City 

Instructor: Palau

 

A Mexico City writer who wonders whether individuality dissolves in his overcrowded, “post-apocalyptic city.” A poet who imagines the possibilities of a booming metropolis while riding a ferry between Manhattan and Brooklyn. A nineteenth-century intellectual for whom the rise of urban centers in Argentina represents hope for civility, order, and national prosperity. Photojournalists who wander Mexico’s capital with their cameras, capturing both the minute details and big stories of everyday city life. No matter how different, all these people produce and practice the city in some way: they write, they wander, they take photographs and ponder what their cities are and might become, all the while navigating urban space and exploring the complexities of finding and losing histories, objects, and selves within it. But who—and what—gets lost and found in the American city? As cultural, political, and economic centers, can cities foster connection, creativity, and belonging? What gets lost—or pushed into possible oblivion—in and by the city? With these questions in mind, we’ll spend the semester exploring the imagined landscapes of four of America’s most iconic cities—New York, Mexico City, Buenos Aires, and Los Angeles. Along the way, we’ll consider some of the ways in which urban spaces are experienced, constructed, explored, and imagined as spaces where some get lost, others found.

Comparative Literature XBR1B—English Composition in Connection With the Reading of World Literature (4 units)
Enroll: 
second-half of R&C
Department Abbreviation: 
TBD
Prerequisite: 

Completion of both the UC Entry Level Writing Requirement and the first half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement.

Satisfies: 
The second-half (R1B portion) of the reading and composition requirement if completed with a C− or better.
Course Description: 

Get instruction in expository writing based on analysis of selected masterpieces of ancient and modern literature. You come to understand the readings through class discussion and writing and revising papers that analyze the readings in academic argument form. Learn to read and write at the analytical and critical levels required at the University of California. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections 
Comparative Literature R1B-1
On the Move: Experiences in Travel

Instructor: Palau

 

What does it mean to travel? How does the experience of taking a trip, being 'out of place,' or traveling away from 'home' shape how we see ourselves and our world? If, as Brazilian writer Mário de Andrade implies, travel is something we learn, not just do, how are we taught to travel and why? In this course, we will take these questions as a point of departure for our own journey through a variety of materials that portray different experiences in travel. We will study photographs and postcards, film, maps, and writing from across multiple genres. As we follow the routes of backpackers and tourists, explorers and adventurers, escapists and exiles, we will think through the questions of identity, space, movement, and encounter that have shaped how travel has been experienced and imagined.

Earth and Planetary Science (Geology) XB80—Environmental Earth Sciences (3 units)
Department: 
Physical Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XEPS
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Physical Science breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Survey human interactions with the planet Earth. You examine topics ranging from geologic hazards, such as earthquakes and volcanoes, to human effects on the environment, such as pollution and climate change. You also study geologic aspects of the use of land and oceans. Three hours of lecture per week.

Earth and Planetary Science (Geology) XB80—Environmental Earth Sciences: Soils (3 units)
Department: 
Physical Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XEPS
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Physical Science breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Ask just about any group of people for a list of global environmental problems and they are likely to respond with the latest topics featured on the evening news – severe storms, global warming, climate change, sea level rise, melting of the polar ice caps, eco-terrorism, destruction of the rainforests, loss of biodiversity, and so on.  Yet curiously missing from almost every list is the shrinking supply of topsoil worldwide. Often taken for granted and viewed as a limitless resource, soil is, in fact, in limited supply. Many international organizations now place soil loss as the single most critical global environmental issue followed closely by an adequate supply of water to quench the thirst of the world’s burgeoning population. We will use an interdisciplinary exploration of soils to frame our broader understanding of the integration of Earth systems and their relationship to environmental issues globally. This is an applied, hands-on course designed to provide students with a general understanding of Earth systems and how they interact. Be prepared to roll up your sleeves, get your hands dirty, and maybe your feet wet. The goal of this course is to prompt you to initiate environmental change through a better understanding of the ground beneath your feet. Change starts from the ground up! Three hours of lecture per week.

Earth and Planetary Science (Geology) XBC20—Earthquakes in Your Backyard (3 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XEPS
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Physical Science breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

 Introduction to earthquakes, their causes and effects. General discussion of basic principles and methods of seismology and geological tectonics, distribution of earthquakes in space and time, effects of earthquakes, and earthquake hazard and risk, with particular emphasis on the situation in California.

English XB31AC—Literature of American Cultures (4 Units)
Department: 
Arts and Literature
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XENGLIS
Prerequisite: 

None; however, this is a writing- and reading-intensive course, and your writing skills should exceed the College Writing course level.

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and the Arts and Literature breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Get an introduction to short stories, poems, memoirs and essays by contemporary African-American, Latin American, Asian-American, Native American and Middle Eastern American authors. Reading transports us to new worlds where we can encounter different, sometimes unsettling voices. Discussing and then writing about these diverse texts will not only deepen your appreciation for your own familial and cultural legacies, but will also help you become more open to those of others. This course is open to all students, but especially recommended for prospective English majors and for students who have satisfied the R&C requirement and wish to develop college-level reading, analytic and writing skills. Three hours of lecture per week.

English XBR1A—Reading and Composition: Berkeley Campus (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XENGLIS
Prerequisite: 

Completion of the UC Entry-level Writing Requirement

Satisfies: 
The first-half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement
Course Description: 

Get further instruction in expository writing and focus on the recursive nature of writing and reading. You develop practical fluency in writing longer expositions and gain experience in including research results into papers. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections 
English R1A-1 (Section Cancelled)
 
English R1A-2
21st Century America as Seen through its Celebrated Writers

Instructor: Gilbert, R.

How do we structure our stories and essays these days, what are they about, how do we use language? What do we watch in our theaters? Who do we educated Americans think we are?


English R1A-4
Ambition

Instructor: Miller

Who are you, and what are your dreams and ambitions? Do your aspirations line up with your passions and talents? What gets in the way of achieving goals you set? Do you face hidden obstacles? This course will help us address these and other questions by concentrating on a set of skills crucial to college success: thinking for yourself, making yourself clear when you write, and speaking up in the public spaces of the classroom. To help you get to know yourself and your ambitions better, we will read, discuss, and write about essays, poems, short stories and a novel that address ambition in a number of ways. Encountering these narratives will inspire you to identify your aspirations for college and for life, and to understand what might be getting in the way of reaching them. In the process, you will learn how you can set yourself up for success as college writers.

 

English R1A-6
Solitude, Attention and the Struggle to Be

Instructor: O'Brien

Why is Hamlet's famous question among the most universally familiar and quoted lines of literature? One of Shakespeare's most performed plays, Hamlet remains an enigma to most viewers, as the main character's motives, words, and acts puzzle the mind--at least the surface mind--and leave us in doubt as to why an apparently angry, grief stricken, and often confused protagonist remains a box office draw over centuries. In this section of English 1B we will practice basic skills in reading a few classic texts that explore major issues (such as that Hamlet confronts), begin to learn how to broaden and deepen our reading with the aid of other key texts, and explore the application of this research to concerns that occupy us all as individuals and as members of local and global communities, including those of the past, present, and future.

English R1A-11, R1A-12
Identity as Performance

Instructor: Ghosh

“All the world’s a stage, And all the men and women merely players.”  --As You Like It, Act II Sc. VII  We often hear people say that actions speak louder than words. We express our identities, who we are, through our actions, our performances, our lived experiences amidst the context and structures within which we operate. We connect with our immediate socio-political circumstances, and these relations, in turn, determine our performances of our identities. Personal identity is thus not a concrete unchangeable idea, but its performance is constantly in flux depending on the context. This will be a reading- and writing-intensive course where we will examine short stories, poems, novels, plays, and films focusing on the construction of identity through performance.  This course fulfills the first half of the UC Reading & Composition requirement; together with our critical inquiry into modes of reading, we will practice our writing skills. We will devote plenty of time to critical thinking and essay-writing skills, paying particular attention to argumentation, analysis, and the fundamentals of writing at the college level.


English R1A-20, R1A-21
Gender and Identity

Instructor: Correa

In this course, we will investigate the impact that gender has on identity. What does it mean to be a man? What does it mean to be a woman? How have gender constraints changed over the years? Using a variety of primary sources—short stories, essays, poems, novels and a play we will consider the shifting boundaries of gender roles over time and across cultures.


English R1A-22
"Forget it Jake, it's Chinatown": Chinatown and the Culture of Exclusion

Instructor: Lee

Taking Chinatown as a case study, this course will explore the ideological investments that underscore literary and filmic representations of racialized urban spaces. On the one hand, we will consider the formal strategies used to construct the geography of Chinatown and on the other, how Chinatown is deployed as a key site for popular imaginations about urban crime, poverty, race, and sexuality.  We will examine the ways in which literary and cultural representations constitute and negotiate race, class, and sexual boundaries in the American city, and their broader implications for questions of national identity and citizenship.  How does Chinatown narrate the story of American exclusion?  In addition to thinking about Chinatown as an ethnic enclave, we will also consider Chinatown as a global space taking into account its reconfigurations under the impact of cultural and capitalist globalization.  We will consider Chinatown as an urban aesthetic, in part by paying attention to figures such as the FOB, gangster, and hipster and the ways in which they have variously laid claim on Chinatown.  Finally, Chinatown is a political space; by studying the protests and social movements that sprang out of Chinatown, we will look at how Chinatown has changed not only America’s social and cultural landscapes but also American politics. This course will develop your critical thinking, close-reading, and composition skills through in-class discussions and exercises. Students will begin by writing short essays in response to the readings, which we will develop into progressively longer essays throughout the semester. Through a series of in-class workshops, we will discuss student drafts and suggestions for revisions.

English R1A-23
Explorers, Monsters, and Magicians

Instructor: TBA

In this course, we will read and write about characters who go on physical journeys that parallel their mental search to affirm who they are and where they belong. We'll explore how classic and contemporary works illuminate diverse answers to the following questions: What powers, burdens, or risks go with defining oneself (or being defined as) an explorer, a hero, a scholar-magician, an outsider, or even a monster? How responsible are we for the dreams and inventions we create? What does it mean to leave or find a home? How far should one person go to fight for his or her reputation, name, or honor? What are the connections between art and life? Between language and power?

 
English XBR1A—Reading and Composition: San Francisco Campus (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XENGLIS
Prerequisite: 

Completion of the UC Entry-level Writing Requirement

Satisfies: 
The first-half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement
Course Description: 

Get further instruction in expository writing and focus on the recursive nature of writing and reading. You develop practical fluency in writing longer expositions and gain experience in including research results into papers. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections 
English R1A-14, R1A-15, R1A-17
Writing California

Instructor: Angevine

Welcome to (the University of) California, the rich, varied, and wonderful place you now call home. We’ll structure our introduction to college reading and writing by exploring a group of texts—among them Maxine Hong Kingston’s The Woman Warrior, John Steinbeck’s In Dubious Battle, Joan Didion’s Play It As It Lays, Roman Polanski’s film Chinatown, and a number of essays, stories, and poems—that reflect on California’s unique promises, paradoxes, and problems. We’ll take advantage of our San Francisco location to explore the concept of California in the visual arts, too, focusing particularly on works in the collection of the newly reopened SFMOMA.

English R1A-19
San Francisco: Reverberations of the 1960's

Instructor: Lempert

In popular histories of San Francisco, so much of the city’s identity – the town’s progressive politics, its embrace of all things strange and funky, even its current status as the epicenter of technological innovation – traces its roots back to the 1960’s. (We could extend this history to Berkeley, too, which still leads the nation in tie-dyes per capita.) To be fair, there is some truth here. The hippies, the Black Panthers, the techo-utopians, the burnouts, Asian American literature, LGBTQ activism, even the still-lingering smells of incense and patchouli: all rightfully come from the 1960’s.  Yet to read San Francisco only through the 1960’s papers over so much more. The Beatniks of the 1950’s – famous for hanging out in North Beach – shared little of the hope of their hippie offspring. The 1970’s saw widespread disillusionment and paranoia. Even the Gold Rush of 1849 built SF up not as a place of love and peace, but as a place to get rich quick. (Sound familiar?) Today, widespread gentrification and the exodus of minority populations has the city wondering if it’s still the place people long dreamed about coming to.  In this class, we’ll examine this complicated legacy, that of the 1960’s on San Francisco. We’ll look at what came before and what after. We’ll ask what SF has meant at different times and to different sorts of demographics, cultures, and identities. We’ll read novels, poems, and essays, listen to a bunch of music, watch at least one film, and go on a field trip or two.  As this is a college writing class, we’ll also spend plenty of time on writing and argumentation, working on various problems of interpretation, style, clarity, flow, interest, cohesion and analysis. It will be great.

English XBR1B—Reading and Composition: Berkeley Campus (4 units)
Enroll: 
second-half of R&C
Department Abbreviation: 
XENGLIS
Prerequisite: 

Completion of both the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement and the first-half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement

Satisfies: 
The second-half (R1B portion) of the reading and composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

Get further instruction in argumentative writing and focus on intensive argumentative writing drawn from controversy stimulated through selected readings and class discussion. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections 
English R1B-1, English R1B-2
Life-on-the Hyphen

Instructor: Nanda

 

Some were brought here, while some came here to the Americas. A fascinating short quote from Walt Whitman begins our course—“I turn but do not extricate myself,/ Confused, a past-reading, another,/ but with darkness yet”— for in a way we are all aliens in this land of aliens asking ourselves who are we, what are we trying to achieve and how may we achieve it? This course is about life in the Americas. It’s about life that beckons, it’s about a life that promises, it’s about a life that often fails—it’s about your life-on-the-hyphen. We read a variety of texts by Toni Morrison,  Kiran Desai and Chang-rae Lee to better understand the complexities and nuances of navigating our own lives on the hyphen.  Basic rhetorical tools such as description, analysis, explanation, narration, speculation and argument will be used to share your experiences, information and views with others. The emphasis will be on provocative theses, strategies of argument and competent analysis of evidence. It will also introduce you to research techniques that would involve evaluation and synthesis of primary and secondary source material into your argument.


English R1B-3, R1B-5
Dystopian Fictions

Instructor: Hollis

 

Dystopian and post-apocalyptic fiction depicts worlds that reflect the worst elements of our own. Often used as a mirror held up to contemporary culture, dystopian fictions may comment on science, technology, and environmental issues developing in our own world. They may also reflect concerns we have with inequality, identity, and political power. Classic dystopian texts include George Orwell’s 1984 and Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World; popular contemporary dystopian texts include books and films like The Hunger Games and Divergent. Although this course will not assign any of those last texts mentioned, we may very well refer to them. The readings for this course will include both obvious and perhaps not-so-obvious works of dystopia.

English R1B-4 
A Journey Through the Epoch

Instructor: Tipton

 

What ties the course together is not a single theme (though different themes--including freedom and engagement; creation and responsibility; the nature of the ideal marriage; the journey and self-discovery--form linking threads throughout the course), but rather the idea of a chronological trip through time. Through literature, we will travel from the Classical to the Medieval Period, up to the Renaissance and then the Romantic Period, to the Modern, and then finally the Postmodern Period.


English R1B-6
Home and Belonging in a Troubled World

Instructor: Fuchs

 

The theme for this class will be the longing for home and belonging in a troubled world. Characters in many of the works on our list (including two films as well as fiction and non-fiction pieces)  have suffered displacement; they range from aboriginal children in Australia abducted from their families by white authorities to migrants fleeing war or poverty, buoyed by hope and resilience. We will explore the tensions that many newcomers (and their children) experience between assimilation to a foreign culture and fidelity to their own traditions. We will look at representations of a variety of spaces that house people, in some cases by force (including prisons and internment camps), analyzing the conditions which are essential for protagonists to feel whole and "at home" within themselves and their world.


English R1B-7, English R1B-8
Tales and Their Tellers: Storytelling in Fiction and Nonfiction

Instructor: Colopy

 

Humans love stories.  We seem to need them almost as much as we need food, especially when we’re growing up. There are many ways of telling a story; the readings selected for this class represent some of them, ranging from journalism and realism to fantasy.  Looking mostly at contemporary works of fiction we will try to understand—through discussion and writing assignments—what we gain from stories, how we as readers establish a relationship with their narrators, and how that contributes to our understanding of the ideas and realities the authors aim to explore. We will also consider why it is we even like stories that may make us uncomfortable.

English XBR1B—Reading and Composition: San Francisco Campus (4 units)
Enroll: 
second-half of R&C
Department Abbreviation: 
XENGLIS
Prerequisite: 

Completion of both the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement and the first-half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement

Satisfies: 
The second-half (R1B portion) of the reading and composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

Get further instruction in argumentative writing and focus on intensive argumentative writing drawn from controversy stimulated through selected readings and class discussion. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections 
English R1B-15
Asian in America 

Instructor: Premnath

 

Asians have been part of US society since the early days of the republic. Yet Asians continue to occupy an anomalous, sometimes problematic location in American life. In this course we will study how Asian American writers, thinkers, and artists respond to the challenges and explore the possibilities of their vexed cultural situation. Our readings will foreground the rich Asian American history of the San Francisco Bay Area, and the Japanese internees, Filipino manongs, Indian revolutionaries, and nerds of all nations who made it. We’ll also take advantage of our location to visit crucial historic sites like Chinatown, the International Hotel Manilatown Center, and the Gadar Memorial Hall. Students will develop their own stake in the material through a series of guided writing projects involving significant independent research.


English R1B-16
The Right to the City

Instructor: Premnath

 

The city looms large in the modern imagination: a stage for grand historical spectacles and everyday drama; a zone of contact and exclusion; a space of pleasure and danger, hope and threat. Who gets to define and participate in urban life? Whose interests, needs, and desires get heard in conversations about the future of the city? We’ll explore such questions through a wide-ranging set of texts engaging with urban situations across the planet. We’ll also take advantage of our San Francisco location, exploring the city together and assessing the urgent ongoing debates surrounding gentrification, policing, and tech-driven urban transformation. Students will be encouraged to take informed positions in such debates through a series of guided writing projects involving significant independent research.


English R1B-13, English R1B-14
Getting Perspetive 

Instructor: Miller

 

Welcome to UC Berkeley, the setting you’ve chosen for the next chapter of your life.  You worked hard to get here. Now what? The answer to that question takes us to the heart of English 1B, a class that will help you will develop the critical thinking and writing skills college requires. How? With guidance from writers on our syllabus, many of whom have chosen UC Berkeley or the San Francisco Bay Area as their literary backdrop, what the author of The Triggering Townhas called the “stage setting” or “base of operations” of a text. These poems, memoirs, essays, short stories, and novels will inspire you to read thoughtfully, think deeply, question assumptions, identify beliefs, and confront biases. The voices, narrators, and characters you encounter this semester are struggling to get some perspective -- literally, intellectually, psychologically, and morally. As they reflect upon new identities, shifting family allegiances, different environments, devastating losses, and complicated moral dilemmas, you also might find yourself feeling disoriented, getting lost, pushed to test, adjust, or discard familiar ideas while new perspectives, views, and theories come into focus.

Environmental Science Policy and Management XB50AC - Introduction to Culture and Natural Resource Management (4 units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Philosophy and Values
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XESPM
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies, Philosophy and Values, or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Learn how culture affects the way we use and manage fire, wildlands and urban forests, rangelands, parks and preserves, and croplands in America. The basic concepts and tools for evaluating the role of culture in resource use and management are introduced and used to examine the experience of American cultural groups in the development and management of Western natural resources. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Ethnic Studies XB21AC—A Comparative Survey of Racial and Ethnic Groups in the United States (4 units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XETHSTD
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Examine the historical experiences of European immigrants, African Americans and Latinos, emphasizing the themes of migration and economic change since the late-19th century. You will also learn about the experiences of Asian Americans, Native Americans and recently arrived immigrants in the context of the course themes. Throughout the course, discuss intragroup differences such as gender, socioeconomic stratification and cultural variation. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Film XB50—Film for Non-majors: California in the Cinematic Imagination (4 Units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XFILM
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Arts and Literature breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

This course examines how California has figured in the cinematic imagination as an industrial center and as a landscape of fantasy, site for the formulation and revision of national mythologies regarding the American West. We will assemble a cinematic history of the state –from the founding of the Spanish missions to the 21st century –while asking how filmmakers from D. W. Griffith to P. T. Anderson figure the California landscape as both wasteland and promised land, iconic backdrop for the examination of American national identity and politics, the construction of gender, and narratives of racial and class struggle. Texts will address the history of the state, the history of the film industry therein, and formal, narrative, and ideological analyses of the films that structure the course.

Film XBR1A—The Craft of Writing—Film Focus (4 units)
Enroll: 
first-half of R&C
Department Abbreviation: 
XFILM
Prerequisite: 

Completion of the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement

Satisfies: 
The first-half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition Requirement
Course Description: 

Gain a rhetorical approach to reading and writing argumentative discourse with a film focus. Close reading of selected texts; written themes developed from class discussion and analysis of rhetorical strategies. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections 
Film R1A-1
Screening Nature: Figuring "the Natural" in American Cinema 

Instructor: Carpenter

 

These days, one sees “green” messages everywhere one looks: in advertisements for “natural” food products and fuel-efficient automobiles, businesses’ and broadcast networks’ endorsements of earth-friendly practices, and apocalyptic visions on both big and small screens. In radio, television, and film, on the internet, in print culture and in social networks, environmentalist rhetoric exhorts us to behave a certain way toward the world we inhabit. Because we might think that these images and actions are generally a good thing, we might not think twice about them. And yet, each of these messages makes an argument that relies on assumptions about what nature is, what it means to be human, and how humans, natures, and technologies should interact. Whether we realize it or not, these assumptions structure our ways of thinking and set the course of our actions. This course examines how visual culture does such a thing by pointedly interrogating the way that "nature" figures in the American cinema. By studying the history of the concept of nature in America, and how it has shown up in films across genres -- even where we don't expect it -- we will work toward a new definition of what nature means for us. Moreover, as we discover how nature works as an idea and an image in the texts that surround us, you will emerge able to identify how nature reflects a variety of historically specific notions of race, gender, and nation.

Film R1A-2
"You know you're dealing with the Yakuza, right?": The Gangster across World Cinema

Instructor: TBA

 

The gangster on the big screen is "what we want to be and what we are afraid we might become." So argues critic Robert Warshow in his 1954 essay on “The Gangster as Tragic Hero,” and so starts our investigation into these appealing monsters that capitalism has given us. This course is invested in exploring the historical roots of these violent and doomed heroes whose rise and falls so entrance us. We’ll track the birth of a figure driven by destructive wants, the id of depression era America. Then, like the rapidity of a Tommy gun's blast, our study will quickly expand our course's lens across time and national cinemas, from the gangs of London and the French banlieue to the Chinese Triads and Japanese Yakuza to the new waves of mobsters of the 21st Century. Our cinematic immersion will be driven by a set of questions: what thematic and formal elements remain constant in portrayals of the gangster? In what ways do filmmakers employ the archetypical figure to craft nuanced socio-political critiques of institutional corruption in their respective cultures? What does the gangster, inexorably tied to the city, expose about the viewer's own corrosive appetites and to paraphrase Warshow, what are we afraid of becoming if we were to give in to them? For no matter what else the gangster film may entail, it is always about the alluring but destructive energy of a capitalism that constantly promises us the world even as it threatens to destroy it.

 

Gender and Women’s Studies XB10—Introduction to Gender and Women’s Studies (4 units)
Department: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XGWS
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Get an introduction to questions and concepts in gender and women's studies. Critically study the formation of gender and its intersections with other relations of power, such as sexuality, racialization, class, religion and age. Questions are addressed within the context of a transnational world. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Geography XB30—The Ocean World (4 units)
Department: 
Biological Science
Physical Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XGEOG
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Either the Biological Science or the Physical Science category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Gain an introduction to the cultural and physical geography of the world's oceans. Topics include ecology of ocean biota and environments; history and geography of ocean peoples, cultures and resource use; problems confronting ocean peoples and environments; and new approaches to saving the oceans. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Geography XB50AC—California (4 units)
Department: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XGEOG
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences, American Cultures
Course Description: 

California had been called "the great exception" and "America, only more so." Yet few of us pay attention to its distinctive traits and to its effects beyond our borders. California may be "a state of mind," but it is also the most dynamic place in the most powerful country in the world, and would be the 8th largest economy if it were a country. Its wealth has been built on mining, agriculture, industry, trade, and finance. Natural abundance and geographic advantage have played their parts, but the state's greatest resource has been its wealth and diversity of people, who have made it a center of technological and cultural innovation from Hollywood to Silicon Valley. Yet California has a dark side of exploitation and racialization.

History of Art XB11—Introduction to Western Art: Renaissance to the Present (4 units)
Department: 
Arts and Literature
Historical Studies
Department Abbreviation: 
XHISTAR
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Either the Arts and Literature or Historical Studies breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

An introduction to the historical circumstances and visual character of Western art from the Renaissance to the present, this course is not a chronological survey but an exploration of topics and themes central to this period. For example: What tasks did painting and sculpture perform in the past? For whom and at whose expense? How do the rise of landscape painting, the cult of the artist and the new emphasis on the nude relate to the emergence of modern society? Do stylistic labels like classicism, realism, impressionism and modernism help answer such questions? This course is recommended for potential art majors and for students in other disciplines, both humanities and sciences. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

History of Art XBR1B—Reading and Writing About Visual Experience (4 units)
Enroll: 
second-half of R&C
Department Abbreviation: 
History of Art XBR1B—Reading and Writing About Visual Experience (4 units)
Prerequisite: 

Completion of both the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement and the first-half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement

Satisfies: 
The second-half (R1B portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

How do mechanisms of perception structure responses to visual art? What is at stake when words describe images? By means of intensive looking, thinking, speaking and writing, this course introduces you to a series of problems and issues in the description and analysis of works of art. Because this course is also an introduction to the historical study of art, it is intended for students with no previous course work in the field. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections 
History of Art R1B-1
From Parchment to Paper: Manuscripts, Prints and Drawings in Early Modern Europe

Instructor: Regan

 

This course examines some of the most important works of art in Renaissance Europe: images in books and on paper. We will look at illuminated manuscripts – that is, painted books – as well as prints, early printed books and drawings, to think about how people in the Renaissance used images in their daily lives. From such pictures, people learned and formed beliefs about everything from miraculous events to social values to the discovery of the New World. In addition to talking about how art of the time explored themes like ethnicity, religion and gender, we'll look at drawings by some of the greatest Renaissance masters – including Leonardo, Michelangelo and Raphael. Visits to the Berkeley Art Museum and the Bancroft Library will let us write about works of art we see in person, and a final research paper lets students choose topics to explore in depth.

History XB7B (AC)—The United States From Civil War to Present (4 units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XHISTOR
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade.
Course Description: 

Examine the experiences and conflicts that comprise American society's history. You will be exposed to a wide range of historical actors and dialogues in order to understand the past, from the perspective of the men and women who experienced it and to gain some insight into the daily lives of Americans: work and leisure, cultures and ideologies, relations with one another, and the political and economic system under which they lived. Lectures and readings focus on the complex interplay among political, economic and cultural interests, and will examine, in particular depth, race relations, the laboring classes, reform movements, the interior of American lives, the changing conditions for success and survival in the culture Americans were shaping, and the emerging role of the United States as a world power. Three hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per week.

Integrative Biology XB31—The Ecology and Evolution of Animal Behavior (3 units)
Department: 
Biological Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XINTEGB
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Biological Science breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Learn about the principles of evolution biology as they relate to animal behavior and behavioral ecology with a broad coverage of animal groups. This course is designed for those not specializing in biology. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Integrative Biology XB33—The Age of Dinosaurs (3 units)
Department: 
Biological Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XINTEGB
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Biological Science breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

In this lecture course, focus on dinosaurs from their appearance to extinction. Learn about the dinosaur skeleton, reconstructing dinosaurs, basic principles of evolution, classification and adaptation, and a survey of dinosaur types. You consider dinosaur reproduction, the question of dinosaur endothermy and the origin of birds. You also survey the other animals that coexisted with the dinosaurs to build a picture of the Mesozoic world. Lectures are often illustrated with slides. Three hours of lecture per week.

Legal Studies XBR1B—Reading and Composition in Connection With the Law as a Social Institution (4 units)
Enroll: 
second-half of R&C
Department Abbreviation: 
XLEGALS
Prerequisite: 

Completion of both the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement and the first-half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement.

Satisfies: 
The second-half (R1B portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

Develop your skills in critical reading, writing and analysis, and complete a series of essays culminating in a research paper relating to law, legal actors and legal institutions. Emphasis is placed on the process of writing, including developing research questions, constructing an argument and revising for content and style. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections (Themes and titles below from Fall 2016)
Legal Studies R1B-1
Law, Religion, and Culture

Instructor: TBA

 

Course Description: In this reading and composition seminar, we will examine historical and contemporary examples of the law’s regulation of religion in order to think critically about the values of freedom, liberty, and equality in democratic societies. We will bring a range of classic texts on religion (such as John Locke’s A Letter Concerning Toleration and Karl Marx’s On the Jewish Question) to bear on watershed legal cases (on such issues as polygamy, religious dress in the workplace, the consumption of spiritual hallucinogens, and faith-based objections to reproductive healthcare). In doing so, we will also examine how the democratic tensions in these texts are made manifest in modern culture by interpreting street art, ethnographic accounts of spiritually-driven lives, and popular media. Some of the questions we will explore include: What “counts” as religion in the eyes of the law? How has the relationship between religion and the law been historically understood in the democratic liberal state, and how do these historical understandings account for (or refute the possibility of) religious difference? How might contemporary socio-cultural developments – like the recent refusal of some Southern Baptists to serve same-sex couples – help us to uncover what assumptions the law makes about the “proper” practice of religion? Can religious freedom and individual liberty ever truly coexist in a democratic state? Fundamentally, this course attends to how the law has served to shape both religious practices and normative values. As a result, students will emerge from this course with a nuanced understanding of how law, religion, and culture are not separate entities, but rather generative of one another.

Legal Studies XBR1B—Reading and Composition in Connection With the Law as a Social Institution (4 units)
Enroll: 
second-half of R&C
Department Abbreviation: 
XLEGALS
Prerequisite: 

Completion of both the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement and the first-half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement.

Satisfies: 
The second-half (R1B portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

Develop your skills in critical reading, writing and analysis, and complete a series of essays culminating in a research paper relating to law, legal actors and legal institutions. Emphasis is placed on the process of writing, including developing research questions, constructing an argument and revising for content and style. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections
Legal Studies R1B-2
Democracy, Disobedience, and Resistance

Instructor: TBA

 

This reading and composition seminar takes its inspiration from the rich histories of protest and free speech in the San Francisco Bay Area. Over the course of the semester, we will consider such questions as: Do we – as citizens and residents of the United States – have an obligation to obey the laws enacted by our government? If democracy is understood to be government “by and for the people,” what do we owe to the state and our peers? Are we morally obligated to obey laws that we consider to be unjust? And, if the laws are indeed deemed unjust, what kinds of social protest, disobedience, and resistance are justified? To answer these questions, this course will engage with a range of classic and contemporary texts from philosophers, legal actors, and practitioners of disobedience on such themes as obligation, justice, non-violent versus violent action, coercion, responsibility, authority, and liberty. After considering foundational philosophical texts from thinkers like Plato, John Locke, and John Stuart Mill, we will devote significant time to analyzing tangible moments of democratically-oriented disobedience and resistance, including: the American Revolution (which will feature the popular musical Hamilton, the Federalist and Anti-Federalist Papers, and the 19th writings of Henry David Thoreau); the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s (which will draw from the speeches and writings of Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, and Berkeley’s own Mario Savio); the Feminist Movement (which will incorporate writings from historical figures like Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony as well as contemporary political and legal theorists like Catharine MacKinnon and Judith Butler); and the present (which will examine the Supreme Court’s decision in Citizens United, the Black Lives Matter movement, and popular responses to Donald Trump’s Executive Order to ban travel from Muslim-majority nations). Each of these moments will serve as “test cases” for thinking about expanding, altering, or otherwise rehabilitating the political and legal conditions of participatory and representative democracy. Where and when appropriate, students can expect to observe or analyze the coverage of protests occurring in San Francisco, Oakland, and Berkeley. This seminar is part of the On the Same Page program, recognizing the diverse and unique voices that contribute to the shaping of democratic life. For more, see: http://onthesamepage.berkeley.edu.

Letters and Science XB1—Exploring the Liberal Arts (2 units)
Department: 
Electives
Department Abbreviation: 
XL&S
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Electives do not fulfill University or breadth requirements, but are great opportunities to enrich your schedule in areas you find interesting.
Course Description: 

Get introduced to the intellectual landscape of the College of Letters and Science, revealing the underlying assumptions, goals and structure of a liberal arts education. Topics include the difference between the College of Letters and Science and the professional schools, the rationale behind the breadth requirement, the approaches and methodologies of each of the divisions in the college, and the benefits of engaging in research as an undergraduate. The ultimate goal of the course is to transform you into an informed participant in your educational experiences so that you can make the most of your years at Berkeley. One-and-a-half hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Linguistics XB55AC—The American Languages (4 units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XLINGUI
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Using a linguistic view of the history, society and culture of the United States, explore the variety of languages spoken in our country and the issues surrounding them: language and ethnicity, politics of linguistic pluralism versus societal monolingualism, language and education, language shift, loss, retention and renewal. Languages include English (standard and nonstandard, African-American English), pidgins and creoles, Native American languages, Spanish, French, and immigrant languages from Asia and Europe. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Mathematics XB16A—Analytic Geometry and Calculus (3 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XMATH
Examples of Intended Majors: 
Business Administration (Haas), Architecture, Economics, Public Health, Environmental Sciences
Prerequisite: 

Three years of high school mathematics, including trigonometry, plus a satisfactory grade in one of the following: CEEB MAT test, an AP test, the UC/CSU math diagnostic exam or Math 32. It is strongly recommended that you take 16A only if you have already completed precalculus. Students will not receive credit for 16A after taking 1A. Two units of Math 16A may be used to remove a deficient grade in Math 1A.

Satisfies: 
Quantitative Reasoning requirement if completed with a grade of C− or better. Some majors have specific grade requirements. Fulfills prerequisites for several social science majors.
Course Description: 

Math 16A covers much of the same basic topics as Math 1A, but does not include in-depth calculus and does not prepare you to continue on to Match 53 or 54. Math 16A introduces integration, the fundamental theorem of calculus, areas in the plane and other applications of the definite integral. This course is intended for students in the life and social sciences whose programs require only one year of calculus.Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Topics Covered: 
Functions, derivatives of simple functions, logarithms and exponentials, as well as applications of the derivative, including rate of change, techniques of graphing, optimization problems, related rates and differentials.
Skills Needed: 
  • Facility with a scientific calculator or graphing calculator may be required
    • Ability to determine the value of a complicated expression using a scientific or graphing calculator
  • Facility with fractions
    • Ability to simplify rational expressions and solve rational equations
  • Facility with algebra
    • Ability to solve linear equations
    • Ability to solve quadratic equations by factoring, completing the square and using the quadratic formula
    • Ability to solve a linear system of equations
  • Facility with graphing
    • Ability to identify and plot points on the Cartesian plane
    • Ability to graph lines
  • Facility with exponential and logarithmic functions
    • Familiarity with e and natural logarithms
    • Ability to simplify expressions containing logarithms
    • Ability to solve logarithmic equations
    • Ability to graph exponential and logarithmic functions
  • Facility with trigonometry
    • Familiarity with radian measure
    • Ability to compute trigonometric functions of simple angles
    • Ability to use the Pythagorean Theorem
    • Ability to solve triangle using the Law of Sines or the Law of Cosines
  • Knowledge of addition formula for sine and cosine
Mathematics XB1A—Calculus (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XMATH
Examples of Intended Majors: 
Physical Sciences, Engineering, Mathematics, Computer Sciences, Molecular and Cell Biology, Economics, Astronomy, Chemistry, Geology, Statistics
Prerequisite: 

Three-and-a-half years of high school mathematics, including trigonometry and analytic geometry, plus a satisfactory grade in one of the following: CEEB MAT test, an AP test, the UC/CSU math diagnostic test or Math 32. It is strongly recommended that you take 1A only if you have already completed precalculus.

Satisfies: 
Quantitative Reasoning requirement if completed with a grade of C− or better. Some majors have specific grade requirements. Students will not receive credit for 1A after taking 16B and 2 units after taking 16A. Math 1A is required to continue on to Math 53 or 54 and are prerequisites for physical science, computer science and math majors. Life science majors also accept this series.
Course Description: 

Math 1A covers the topics of calculus of one variable, mainly with derivatives, and applications such as graphing and optimization. It introduces the idea of integration and applications such as volumes of revolution. Students are expected to understand some theorems and their proofs. This rigorous course emphasizes conceptual understanding and is intended for students in engineering and physical sciences. Three hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per week.

Topics Covered: 
Intuitive and precise limit definitions, continuity, definition of the derivative, shortcut rules for finding derivatives, product rule, quotient rule, chain rule, implicit differentiation, related rates, linear approximations and differentials, mean value theorem, L'Hopital's rule, curve sketching, optimization, Newton's Method, definition of Riemann integral, Fundamental Theorem of Calculus (Parts 1 and 2), natural logarithm defined as an integral, area between two curves, volumes of solids of revolution.
Skills Needed: 
  • Facility with a scientific calculator or graphing calculator may be required
    • Ability to determine the value of a complicated expression using a scientific or graphing calculator
  • Facility with fractions
    • Ability to simplify rational expressions and solve rational equations
  • Facility with algebra
    • Ability to solve linear equations
    • Ability to solve quadratic equations by factoring, completing the square and using the quadratic formula
    • Ability to solve a linear system of equations
  • Facility with graphing
    • Ability to identify and plot points on the Cartesian plane
    • Ability to graph lines
  • Facility with exponential and logarithmic functions
    • Familiarity with e and natural logarithms
    • Ability to simplify expressions containing logarithms
    • Ability to solve logarithmic equations
      • Ability to graph exponential and logarithmic functions
  • Facility with trigonometry
    • Familiarity with radian measure
    • Ability to compute trigonometric functions of simple angles
    • Ability to use the Pythagorean Theorem
    • Ability to solve triangle using the Law of Sines or the Law of Cosines
    • Knowledge of addition formula for sine and cosine
Mathematics XB1B—Calculus (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XMATH
Examples of Intended Majors: 
Physical Sciences, Engineering, Mathematics, Computer Sciences, Molecular and Cell Biology, Economics, Astronomy, Chemistry, Geology, Statistics
Prerequisite: 

Math 1A or equivalent coursework; please check Assist.org or with the Office of Undergraduate Admissions to make sure your coursework is equivalent to UC Berkeley's Math 1A.

Satisfies: 
Quantitative Reasoning requirement if completed with a grade of C− or better. Some majors have specific grade requirements. Students taking 1B after 16B receive only 2 units for 1B. Math 1B is required to continue on to Math 53 or 54 and are prerequisites for physical science, computer science and math majors. Life science majors also accept this series.
Course Description: 

Math 1B is a continuation of Math 1A. It involves integration techniques and applications and introduces infinite series and first- and second-order differential equations and their uses. It is intended for students with majors in engineering, math and some sciences. Three hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per week.

Topics Covered: 
Integration by parts; trigonometric integrals; trigonometric substitution; partial fractions; midpoint, trapezoid and Simpson’s rules; improper integrals; arc length; area of a surface of revolution; sequences and series; integral test; comparison tests; alternating series; ratio test; root test; power series; Taylor series; binomial series; modeling with differential equations; direction fields; Euler’s method; separable equations; exponential growth and decay; logistic equation; linear differential equations; homogeneous and nonhomogeneous second-order linear differential equations and their applications; series solutions for second-order differential equations.
Skills Needed: 
  • Facility with a scientific calculator or graphing calculator may be required
    • Ability to determine the value of a complicated expression using a scientific or graphing calculator
  • Facility with fractions
    • Ability to simplify rational expressions and solve rational equations
  • Facility with algebra
    • Ability to solve linear equations
    • Ability to solve quadratic equations by factoring, completing the square and using the quadratic formula
    • Ability to solve a linear system of equations
  • Facility with graphing
    • Ability to identify and plot points on the Cartesian plane
    • Ability to graph lines
  • Facility with exponential and logarithmic functions
    • Familiarity with e and natural logarithms
    • Ability to simplify expressions containing logarithms
    • Ability to solve logarithmic equations
    • Ability to graph exponential and logarithmic functions
  • Facility with trigonometry
    • Familiarity with radian measure
    • Ability to compute trigonometric functions of simple angles
    • Ability to use the Pythagorean Theorem
    • Ability to solve triangle using the Law of Sines or the Law of Cosines
    • Knowledge of addition formula for sine and cosine
  • Facility with differentiation
    • Knowledge that a derivative can be interpreted as a rate of change or the slope of a tangent line
    • Ability to compute the derivative of elementary functions
    • Ability to use the product, quotient and chain rules
    • Ability to differentiate implicitly
  • Facility with integration
    • Ability to compute volumes of solids of revolution
    • Ability to integrate using u-substitution
Mathematics XB32—Precalculus (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XMATH
Examples of Intended Majors: 
Any major that requires Math 16A or Math 1A
Prerequisite: 

Three years of high school mathematics and at least a score of 560 on the SAT I Math portion. Email fpf@berkeley.edu if you need to take math but have scored below a 560 on the SAT I.

Satisfies: 
Quantitative Reasoning requirement if completed with a grade of C− or better. Some majors have specific grade requirements. You will not receive credit for Math XB32 after taking Math 1A–1B or 16A–16B and will receive 3 units after taking Math 96.
Course Description: 

This course is designed for students who wish to prepare for calculus. It covers exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometry, complex numbers, binomial theorem, conics and analytic geometry. Three hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per week.

Topics Covered: 
Factoring polynomials, quadratic equations, equations of lines, symmetry and graphs, one-dimensional inequalities, definition and graph of a function, techniques of graphing, composition of functions, inverse of a function, linear functions, quadratic functions, polynomial functions, rational functions, quadratic optimization problems, exponential and logarithmic functions, properties of logarithms, equations and inequalities with logarithms, compound interest, exponential growth and decay, trigonometric functions, right triangle applications, trigonometric identities, radian measure of angles, graphs of the six trigonometric functions, addition formula for trigonometric functions, double angle formulas, product-to-sum and sum-to-product formulas, trigonometric equations, inverse trigonometric functions, law of sines, law of cosines, vectors, parametric equations and polar coordinates.
Skills Needed: 
  • Facility with a scientific calculator or graphing calculator may be required
    • Ability to determine the value of a complicated expression using a scientific or graphing calculator
  • Facility with fractions
    • Ability to simplify rational expressions and solve rational equations
  • Facility with algebra
    • Ability to solve linear equations
    • Ability to solve quadratic equations by factoring, completing the square and using the quadratic formula
    • Ability to solve a linear system of equations
  • Facility with graphing
    • Ability to identify and plot points on the Cartesian plane
    • Ability to graph lines
Middle Eastern Studies XB10—Introduction to Middle Eastern Studies (4 units)
Department: 
International Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XMESTU
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Either the International Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Get introduced to the study of the contemporary Middle East and North Africa, with an emphasis on historical trajectories; political, social and cultural transformations; and religious phenomena. It covers topics related to the Arab world, Turkey, Iran and Israel from an interdisciplinary perspective. The intended audience for the course is Middle Eastern Studies majors, prospective majors and minors, for whom it fulfills the lower-division requirement, as well as students in other majors interested in the Middle East. Three hours of lecture per week.

Molecular and Cell Biology XB32—Introduction to Human Physiology (3 units)
Department: 
Biological Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XMCELLB
Prerequisite: 

One year of high school or college chemistry

Satisfies: 
Biological Science breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

You gain a comprehensive introduction to human cell biology by concentrating on basic mechanisms underlying human life processes, including cells and membranes; nerve and muscle function; cardiovascular, respiratory, renal and gastrointestinal physiology; and metabolism, endocrinology and reproduction. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Music XB27—Introduction to Western Music (4 units)
Department: 
Arts and Literature
Department Abbreviation: 
XMUSIC
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Arts and Literature breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

This course is devoted to the development of listening skills and appreciation of the major forms of Western art music. It is not intended for music majors. The guided listening, lectures and discussions present music as a language in which students can develop a basic fluency. The recorded music used in the course covers the gamut of Western art music from the Renaissance to the present day. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Philosophy XB2—Individual Morality and Social Justice (4 units)
Department: 
Philosophy and Values
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XPHILOS
Prerequisite: 

None; however, this is a writing- and reading-intensive course, and students' writing skills should exceed the College Writing course level.

Satisfies: 
Either the Philosophy and Values or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Survey the basic questions of moral and political philosophy and some important attempts to answer them, with particular attention to topical issues (abortion, the ethics of eating animals and gay marriage, for example). What is the moral thing to do with respect to these issues? Is there a fact of the matter what the moral thing to do is, or does it depend on one's feelings, upbringing or culture? Why should we do what is morally right? Why should we tolerate alien moral beliefs and practices? What role should governments play? Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Philosophy XB3—The Nature of Mind (4 units)
Department: 
Philosophy and Values
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XPHILOS
Prerequisite: 

None; however, this is a writing- and reading-intensive course, and students' writing skills should exceed the College Writing course level.

Satisfies: 
Philosophy and Values breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Gain an introduction to the philosophy of mind, and to philosophical reading, writing and thinking. What is it to have a mind? What kinds of properties are so-called mental properties? What is the connection between knowledge of one's own mental states and knowledge of the mental states of others? What is the connection between knowledge of one's own mental states and knowledge of the world around us? What are we doing when we explain people's behavior in terms of their beliefs, desires and other contenful states? You will also examine the ways in which the nature of our mental states can be said to depend on our relations to features of our environment. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Political Science XB1—Introduction to American Politics (4 units)
Department: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XPOLXCI
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade.
Course Description: 

Get an introductory analysis of the structure and operations of the American political system, primarily at the national level. Three hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per week.

Political Science XB2—Introduction to Comparative Politics (4 units)
Department: 
International Studies
Department Abbreviation: 
XPOLSCI
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Either the International Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Gain a comparative study of countries and their different levels of economic and political development. Examine what they are like; how they came to be the way they are; and their particular expression in Western, Communist and Third-World settings. Topics include the nature of power, processes of politics, and the cultural and social forces that have given countries their distinctive identities. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Psychology XB1—General Psychology (3 units)
Department: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XPSYCH
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Examine a representative sample of topics in psychology, including the operation of neurons and the brain; animal behavior; sensory and perceptual processes; obedience to authority; and theories of personality, mental disorders and psychotherapy. Topics also include the history of psychology (with brief readings from Plato, Darwin, James, Freud and Watson), recent ideas about the role of consciousness in cognition and computer modeling of cognitive processes. Two hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Rhetoric XB2—Fundamentals of Public Speaking (2 units)
Department: 
Electives
Department Abbreviation: 
XRHETOR
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Electives do not fulfill University or breadth requirements, but are great opportunities to enrich your schedule in areas you find interesting.
Course Description: 

Gain help in establishing and developing basic competence in the skills required for effective oral presentations, whether prepared in advance or spontaneous. You cover formulating a clear communicative intent, basic principles of communication and theories of persuasion, organization of presentation material, delivery, use of visual aids and response to audience questions. You make six different oral presentations during the term, with ample opportunity for ungraded practice and coaching prior to evaluation. Three hours of class per week. This course is offered only on a Passed/Not Passed basis. Although this course does not satisfy a College of Letters and Science breadth requirement, units are granted.

Rhetoric XBR1A—The Craft of Writing: Berkeley Campus (4 units)
Enroll: 
first-half of R&C
Department Abbreviation: 
XRHETOR
Prerequisite: 

Completion of the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement or UC Analytical Writing Placement Exam

Satisfies: 
The first-half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

Learn the principles of argumentative writing and emphasizes close readings of texts that reveal their rhetorical structure and intended audience. You learn to identify and interpret a text's thesis and intention and make compelling arguments for your position using textual evidence. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections
Rhetoric R1A-1
Is Science More Persuasive than your Grandmother?

Instructor: Tick

 

Does evidence or logic "speak for itself"?  Are polls more persuasive than politicians?  What is evidence?  Is data "truth"?  Is video of a police action different from an NBA replay? Plato, politics, religion, fiction, the ethics of New Media and Big Data; rhetoric connects these topics.  Using basic rhetorical theory as a flexible, critical tool, we'll consider evidence, social and psychological factors of persuasion, how arguments are constructed, and the role of audience/user in design.  And, absolutely, we'll look at real-time political rhetoric. Rhetoric invites you to think strategically, critically, and be responsible for what you create, especially in writing.  In this class, we will focus on   what you want to accomplish when you communicate, and how to design persuasive presentations to be effective.


Rhetoric R1A-2
Archaeological Readers: Rhetorically Excavating Issues through Close Reading, Critical Thinking, Argumentative Writing 

Instructor: Borst-Rothe

 

Most incoming students are not prepared for the expected level of critical thinking writing, and speaking--skills important at the university and in professional settings. This course will focus on the Rhetorical Framework: identifying critical issues in different disciplines, analyzing style and structure in different arguments, and learning to argue logically and persuasively about authorial intention using textual evidence. Two units focus on the importance of California: one related to the rhetoric of place as a California dream, the other illustrating California's importance in the arts for visual artists, writers, film makers, and photographers. Just as important are units focusing on critical contemporary issues ranging from issues in healthcare to mass incarceration. You'll also have a change to explore the museums (SFMOMA or Berkeley's BAMPFA) as an experiential option in the Art Unit. All writing assignments will focus on modern-day application of classical rhetorical structure, applicable to any field of study, just as brief presentations will help you practice professional speaking. And class discussion, small group work, as well as seminar-style participation will open up the value, the excitement of translating your ideas into clear persuasive arguments, not mere opinions, that you as the next generation of leaders will need. I look forward to taking this archaeological journey with you!

 

Rhetoric XBR1A—The Craft of Writing: San Francisco Campus (4 units)
Enroll: 
first-half of R&C
Department Abbreviation: 
XRHETOR
Prerequisite: 

Completion of the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement or UC Analytical Writing Placement Exam

Satisfies: 
The first-half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

Learn the principles of argumentative writing and emphasizes close readings of texts that reveal their rhetorical structure and intended audience. You learn to identify and interpret a text's thesis and intention and make compelling arguments for your position using textual evidence. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections 
Rhetoric R1A-5
San Francisco: Reverberations of the 1960's

Instructor: Lempert

 

In popular histories of San Francisco, so much of the city’s identity – the town’s progressive politics, its embrace of all things strange and funky, even its current status as the epicenter of technological innovation – traces its roots back to the 1960’s. (We could extend this history to Berkeley, too, which still leads the nation in tie-dyes per capita.) To be fair, there is some truth here. The hippies, the Black Panthers, the techo-utopians, the burnouts, Asian American literature, LGBTQ activism, even the still-lingering smells of incense and patchouli: all rightfully come from the 1960’s.  Yet to read San Francisco only through the 1960’s papers over so much more. The Beatniks of the 1950’s – famous for hanging out in North Beach – shared little of the hope of their hippie offspring. The 1970’s saw widespread disillusionment and paranoia. Even the Gold Rush of 1849 built SF up not as a place of love and peace, but as a place to get rich quick. (Sound familiar?) Today, widespread gentrification and the exodus of minority populations has the city wondering if it’s still the place people long dreamed about coming to.  In this class, we’ll examine this complicated legacy, that of the 1960’s on San Francisco. We’ll look at what came before and what after. We’ll ask what SF has meant at different times and to different sorts of demographics, cultures, and identities. We’ll read novels, poems, and essays, listen to a bunch of music, watch at least one film, and go on a field trip or two.  As this is a college writing class, we’ll also spend plenty of time on writing and argumentation, working on various problems of interpretation, style, clarity, flow, interest, cohesion and analysis. It will be great.

Rhetoric R1A-6, R1A-7
Archaeological Readers: Rhetorically Excavating Issues through Close Reading, Critical Thinking, Argumentative Writing

Instructor: Borst-Rothe

 

Most incoming students are not prepared for the expected level of critical thinking writing, and speaking--skills important at the university and in professional settings. This course will focus on the Rhetorical Framework: identifying critical issues in different disciplines, analyzing style and structure in different arguments, and learning to argue logically and persuasively about authorial intention using textual evidence. Two units focus on the importance of California: one related to the rhetoric of place as a California dream, the other illustrating California's importance in the arts for visual artists, writers, film makers, and photographers. Just as important are units focusing on critical contemporary issues ranging from issues in healthcare to mass incarceration. You'll also have a change to explore the museums (SFMOMA or Berkeley's BAMPFA) as an experiential option in the Art Unit. All writing assignments will focus on modern-day application of classical rhetorical structure, applicable to any field of study, just as brief presentations will help you practice professional speaking. And class discussion, small group work, as well as seminar-style participation will open up the value, the excitement of translating your ideas into clear persuasive arguments, not mere opinions, that you as the next generation of leaders will need. I look forward to taking this archaeological journey with you!

Rhetoric XBR1B—The Craft of Writing: Berkeley Campus (4 units)
Enroll: 
second-half of R&C
Department Abbreviation: 
: XRHETOR
Prerequisite: 

Completion of both the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement and the first-half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement

Satisfies: 
The second-half (R1B portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

Get further instruction in argumentative writing and focus on intensive argumentative writing drawn from controversy stimulated through selected readings and class discussion. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections 
Rhetoric R1B-2
Contributions

Instructor: Schwartz

This class is aimed at improving your reading, writing and speaking skills so that your college work will be more effective and a bit easier.  With that in mind, I've chosen texts for us to read, discuss, and (in some cases) write about that will help the most to achieve that aim—and it turned out that the texts I chose were largely written by people of color, giving us insight into experiences rarely undergone by mainstream Americans.  Each one of them makes an important "Contribution" to our understanding of these experiences.  "Letter from Birmingham Jail" is not only brilliant, but a necessary part of everyone's civic education; Just Mercy, the On The Same Page book from last year, was so very successful with my students that I had to teach it again, and Stevenson eloquently warns us of the consequences of a broken justice system as well as giving us hope that we can improve it.  The Cast Album of  Hamilton IS the On The Same Page text for this year—a brilliant, juicy choice—and much of the course has been given over to it.  Students will read the book that inspired Miranda, Chernow's celebrated biography of the Founding Father, as well as reading the libretto with commentary, so that we get the full experience of the sweeping piece of art that is the music itself.  Lastly, the utopian novel Kin of Ata is aimed to give us some relief and some hope at the end, so we end up with an easier and more uplifting last few weeks as things rush to the usual frantic semester end.  There will be reading, writing exercises, well-supported public speaking, some research to produce an annotated bibliography, as well as academic essays done in several drafts.  Rapping: optional, but attempts are welcome.

Rhetoric XBR1B—The Craft of Writing: San Francisco Campus (4 units)
Enroll: 
second-half of R&C
Department Abbreviation: 
: XRHETOR
Prerequisite: 

Completion of both the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement and the first-half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement

Satisfies: 
The second-half (R1B portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

Get further instruction in argumentative writing and focus on intensive argumentative writing drawn from controversy stimulated through selected readings and class discussion. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections 
Rhetoric R1B-3
San Francisco: Reverberations of the 1960's

Instructor: Lempert

 

In popular histories of San Francisco, so much of the city’s identity – the town’s progressive politics, its embrace of all things strange and funky, even its current status as the epicenter of technological innovation – traces its roots back to the 1960’s. (We could extend this history to Berkeley, too, which still leads the nation in tie-dyes per capita.) To be fair, there is some truth here. The hippies, the Black Panthers, the techo-utopians, the burnouts, Asian American literature, LGBTQ activism, even the still-lingering smells of incense and patchouli: all rightfully come from the 1960’s.  Yet to read San Francisco only through the 1960’s papers over so much more. The Beatniks of the 1950’s – famous for hanging out in North Beach – shared little of the hope of their hippie offspring. The 1970’s saw widespread disillusionment and paranoia. Even the Gold Rush of 1849 built SF up not as a place of love and peace, but as a place to get rich quick. (Sound familiar?) Today, widespread gentrification and the exodus of minority populations has the city wondering if it’s still the place people long dreamed about coming to.  In this class, we’ll examine this complicated legacy, that of the 1960’s on San Francisco. We’ll look at what came before and what after. We’ll ask what SF has meant at different times and to different sorts of demographics, cultures, and identities. We’ll read novels, poems, and essays, listen to a bunch of music, watch at least one film, and go on a field trip or two.  As this is a college writing class, we’ll also spend plenty of time on writing and argumentation, working on various problems of interpretation, style, clarity, flow, interest, cohesion and analysis. It will be great.

Sociology XB3AC—Principles of Sociology: American Cultures (4 units)
Department: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XSOCIOL
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and the Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Comparing the experience of three out of five ethnic groups (i.e., African Americans, Asian Americans, Chicanos/Latinos, European Americans and Native Americans), you examine historically how each people entered American society and built communities and transformed their cultures in the process. Gain an introduction to the sociological perspective; characteristic methods of research; and key concepts such as culture, community, class, race, social change and social movements. Three hours of lecture per week.

Statistics XB2—Introduction to Statistics (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XSTAT
Examples of Intended Majors: 
Psychology, Political Economy, Development Studies, Legal Studies, Nutritional Science: Dietetics, Nutritional Science: Physiology and Metabolism
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Quantitative Reasoning requirement if completed with a grade of C− or better. Some majors have specific grade requirements. Statistics 2 fulfills prerequisites for some social science majors, such as psychology. It does not fulfill prerequisites for the economics major, statistics major or the Haas Undergraduate Business Program.
Course Description: 

This course introduces basic concepts of probability and statistical inference and covers standard methods for making inferences about populations from information contained in sample data: the methods used in sample surveys, opinion polls, research studies and industry. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Topics Covered: 
Populations, statistics, variables, observational studies versus experiments, graphs of data, descriptive measures of location and spread, normal approximation, correlation, the regression line, Simpson’s paradox, probability, binomial and normal distributions, and the behavior of the average of samples, as well as inference methods such as estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis tests for averages and percentages, and the chi-square test.
Skills Needed: 
  • Facility with a scientific calculator or graphing calculator may be required
    • Ability to determine the value of a complicated expression using a scientific or graphing calculator
  • Facility with fractions
    • Ability to simplify rational expressions and solve rational equations
  • Facility with algebra
    • Ability to solve linear equations
    • Ability to solve quadratic equations by factoring, completing the square and using the quadratic formula
    • Ability to solve a linear system of equations
  • Facility with graphing
    • Ability to identify and plot points on the Cartesian plane
    • Ability to graph lines
African American Studies XB98—Homegrown Hip Hop (2 Units)
Department: 
Electives
Department Abbreviation: 
XAFRICAM
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
This course is an elective.
Course Description: 

From its inception, Hip Hop has been (and continues to be) more than just a genre of music. Hip Hop has always served as an umbrella term encompassing art, music, dance, literature, identity, style, entrepreneurship and politics. This course will utilize an interactive and multi-media approach to engaging with Hip Hop Culture in the Bay Area. As the course will deal with contemporary Hip Hop culture in the Bay Area, it will also focus on the regional influences underpinning the Bay Area's distinct Hip-Hop landscape. We will also make it a point to deconstruct the multiple eras of Hip-Hop/rap in the Bay Area, and critically appraise the content contained in Bay Area Hip Hop records. It bears repeating, Hip-Hop culture is not only a source of entertainment within our everyday lives, but also a medium that analyzes/provides commentary regarding social, economic, political and cultural issues dealing with cultural identity, cultural genocide, misogyny, racism, classism, materialism, freedom of speech and freedom of sexuality. During the duration of this semester we will think critically, embrace debate, and delve into the study of Hip Hop culture. 

Anthropology XB2AC—Introduction to Archaeology (4 Units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XANTHRO
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the HIstorical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade.
Course Description: 

Gain an introduction to the discipline of anthropological archaeology with a special emphasis on how archaeology contributes to our understanding of American society and the cultures from which it is drawn. You will learn about the methods, goals and theoretical concepts of archaeology, with attention to the impact archaeology has had on the construction of the histories of diverse communities, such as Native Americans, African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos and European Americans. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Art XB98—Symbolic and Practical: Art and Social Justice (2 Units)
Department: 
Electives
Department Abbreviation: 
XART
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Electives do not fulfill University or breadth requirements, but are great opportunities to enrich your schedule in areas you find interesting.
Course Description: 

Artists have long made works that address issues of justice, equity, freedom and oppression. These works, and the strategies artists employ, are frequently informed by, produced through or in dialogue with social movements that seek to alter the conditions of society. The relationship between art and social movements raises questions about what it means to do art and what it means to do social justice. In order to explore the overlaps, tensions, and distinctions between the symbolic and practical practices of artists and social movements, this course combines student experimentation, readings, videos, discussion and site visits throughout the San Francisco Bay Area.

Art XB98—Visits & Observations: Investigating Bay Area Art (2 Units)
Department: 
Electives
Department Abbreviation: 
XART
Prerequisite: 

None

Course Description: 

Through instruction, structured visits to museums, art galleries, and artist studios, observational journal assignments, group discussion, individualized projects and group critiques, students will learn to visually respond to the world around them. This will occur in transit to locations, the locations themselves, and in the studio. Using their visual journals to track their thought processes during our visits students will learn to observe and respond to a variety of visual sources. These observations will be the catalyst for individualized studio projects that will occur a week after our visits. Students will question the boundaries of where an artistic experience begins and ends while learning where art and inspiration might exist within their community and direct surroundings and how to apply that to their own artistic vision.

College Writing XBR1A—Accelerated Reading and Composition: San Francisco Campus (6 units)
Enroll: 
first-half of R&C and ELWR
Department Abbreviation: 
XCOLWRI
Prerequisite: 

Placement by the UC Analytical Writing Placement Exam. This course is only for students who did not pass the AWPE and have not otherwise satisfied Entry-Level Writing with SAT, ACT, or AP/IB exam scores. 

Satisfies: 
Both the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement and the first-half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

This is an intensive and accelerated composition course. Readings include imaginative, expository and argumentative texts representing the range of those encountered in the undergraduate curriculum. Read from authors with diverse social and cultural backgrounds and perspectives. Instruction covers many types of writing and revising papers. Six hours of class per week.

Section
College Writing R1A-5
Witness and Testimony

Instructor: Spanbock

 

Understanding subjectivity is an essential part of the writing process. When we express ourselves, make an argument, or tell a story, we do so from a position shaped by who we are and where we are, our background and experiences, our thoughts and beliefs, and even how we are feeling in that moment. Subjectivity also plays a foundational role in how we understand and interpret others and the world around us. It shapes our opinions and makes us unique. This class asks students to consider subjectivity through two distinct but related paradigms: witnessing, an act of seeing or otherwise experiencing an event, and testimony, an act of self-expression meant to share or convey opinions on what has been witnessed. The purpose of this class is to introduce practical methods for reading “texts” (print, visual, auditory, social, etc.) and to activate both thought and writing processes to engage with the dynamic issues they raise. Together, we will examine a number of short and long texts that draw from and speak to discourses from across the academic disciplines and raise questions concerning subjectivity in acts of witness and testimony.  We will also explore different techniques for self-expression and different types of writing with a goal of better understanding our own subject positions, as well as those we encounter. Operating under the premise that our community stands to benefit from a diversity of perspectives and opinions, this class will have a specific emphasis on LOCAL instances of witness and testimony in and around the Bay Area.

Earth and Planetary Science (Geology) XB80—Environmental Earth Sciences: Soils (3 units)
Department: 
Physical Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XEPS
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Physical Science breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Ask just about any group of people for a list of global environmental problems and they are likely to respond with the latest topics featured on the evening news – severe storms, global warming, climate change, sea level rise, melting of the polar ice caps, eco-terrorism, destruction of the rainforests, loss of biodiversity, and so on.  Yet curiously missing from almost every list is the shrinking supply of topsoil worldwide. Often taken for granted and viewed as a limitless resource, soil is, in fact, in limited supply. Many international organizations now place soil loss as the single most critical global environmental issue followed closely by an adequate supply of water to quench the thirst of the world’s burgeoning population. We will use an interdisciplinary exploration of soils to frame our broader understanding of the integration of Earth systems and their relationship to environmental issues globally. This is an applied, hands-on course designed to provide students with a general understanding of Earth systems and how they interact. Be prepared to roll up your sleeves, get your hands dirty, and maybe your feet wet. The goal of this course is to prompt you to initiate environmental change through a better understanding of the ground beneath your feet. Change starts from the ground up! Three hours of lecture per week.

English XBR1A—Reading and Composition: San Francisco Campus (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XENGLIS
Prerequisite: 

Completion of the UC Entry-level Writing Requirement

Satisfies: 
The first-half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement
Course Description: 

Get further instruction in expository writing and focus on the recursive nature of writing and reading. You develop practical fluency in writing longer expositions and gain experience in including research results into papers. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections 
English R1A-14, R1A-15, R1A-17
Writing California

Instructor: Angevine

Welcome to (the University of) California, the rich, varied, and wonderful place you now call home. We’ll structure our introduction to college reading and writing by exploring a group of texts—among them Maxine Hong Kingston’s The Woman Warrior, John Steinbeck’s In Dubious Battle, Joan Didion’s Play It As It Lays, Roman Polanski’s film Chinatown, and a number of essays, stories, and poems—that reflect on California’s unique promises, paradoxes, and problems. We’ll take advantage of our San Francisco location to explore the concept of California in the visual arts, too, focusing particularly on works in the collection of the newly reopened SFMOMA.

English R1A-19
San Francisco: Reverberations of the 1960's

Instructor: Lempert

In popular histories of San Francisco, so much of the city’s identity – the town’s progressive politics, its embrace of all things strange and funky, even its current status as the epicenter of technological innovation – traces its roots back to the 1960’s. (We could extend this history to Berkeley, too, which still leads the nation in tie-dyes per capita.) To be fair, there is some truth here. The hippies, the Black Panthers, the techo-utopians, the burnouts, Asian American literature, LGBTQ activism, even the still-lingering smells of incense and patchouli: all rightfully come from the 1960’s.  Yet to read San Francisco only through the 1960’s papers over so much more. The Beatniks of the 1950’s – famous for hanging out in North Beach – shared little of the hope of their hippie offspring. The 1970’s saw widespread disillusionment and paranoia. Even the Gold Rush of 1849 built SF up not as a place of love and peace, but as a place to get rich quick. (Sound familiar?) Today, widespread gentrification and the exodus of minority populations has the city wondering if it’s still the place people long dreamed about coming to.  In this class, we’ll examine this complicated legacy, that of the 1960’s on San Francisco. We’ll look at what came before and what after. We’ll ask what SF has meant at different times and to different sorts of demographics, cultures, and identities. We’ll read novels, poems, and essays, listen to a bunch of music, watch at least one film, and go on a field trip or two.  As this is a college writing class, we’ll also spend plenty of time on writing and argumentation, working on various problems of interpretation, style, clarity, flow, interest, cohesion and analysis. It will be great.

English XBR1B—Reading and Composition: San Francisco Campus (4 units)
Enroll: 
second-half of R&C
Department Abbreviation: 
XENGLIS
Prerequisite: 

Completion of both the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement and the first-half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement

Satisfies: 
The second-half (R1B portion) of the reading and composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

Get further instruction in argumentative writing and focus on intensive argumentative writing drawn from controversy stimulated through selected readings and class discussion. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections 
English R1B-15
Asian in America 

Instructor: Premnath

 

Asians have been part of US society since the early days of the republic. Yet Asians continue to occupy an anomalous, sometimes problematic location in American life. In this course we will study how Asian American writers, thinkers, and artists respond to the challenges and explore the possibilities of their vexed cultural situation. Our readings will foreground the rich Asian American history of the San Francisco Bay Area, and the Japanese internees, Filipino manongs, Indian revolutionaries, and nerds of all nations who made it. We’ll also take advantage of our location to visit crucial historic sites like Chinatown, the International Hotel Manilatown Center, and the Gadar Memorial Hall. Students will develop their own stake in the material through a series of guided writing projects involving significant independent research.


English R1B-16
The Right to the City

Instructor: Premnath

 

The city looms large in the modern imagination: a stage for grand historical spectacles and everyday drama; a zone of contact and exclusion; a space of pleasure and danger, hope and threat. Who gets to define and participate in urban life? Whose interests, needs, and desires get heard in conversations about the future of the city? We’ll explore such questions through a wide-ranging set of texts engaging with urban situations across the planet. We’ll also take advantage of our San Francisco location, exploring the city together and assessing the urgent ongoing debates surrounding gentrification, policing, and tech-driven urban transformation. Students will be encouraged to take informed positions in such debates through a series of guided writing projects involving significant independent research.


English R1B-13, English R1B-14
Getting Perspetive 

Instructor: Miller

 

Welcome to UC Berkeley, the setting you’ve chosen for the next chapter of your life.  You worked hard to get here. Now what? The answer to that question takes us to the heart of English 1B, a class that will help you will develop the critical thinking and writing skills college requires. How? With guidance from writers on our syllabus, many of whom have chosen UC Berkeley or the San Francisco Bay Area as their literary backdrop, what the author of The Triggering Townhas called the “stage setting” or “base of operations” of a text. These poems, memoirs, essays, short stories, and novels will inspire you to read thoughtfully, think deeply, question assumptions, identify beliefs, and confront biases. The voices, narrators, and characters you encounter this semester are struggling to get some perspective -- literally, intellectually, psychologically, and morally. As they reflect upon new identities, shifting family allegiances, different environments, devastating losses, and complicated moral dilemmas, you also might find yourself feeling disoriented, getting lost, pushed to test, adjust, or discard familiar ideas while new perspectives, views, and theories come into focus.

Environmental Science Policy and Management XB50AC - Introduction to Culture and Natural Resource Management (4 units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Philosophy and Values
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XESPM
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies, Philosophy and Values, or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Learn how culture affects the way we use and manage fire, wildlands and urban forests, rangelands, parks and preserves, and croplands in America. The basic concepts and tools for evaluating the role of culture in resource use and management are introduced and used to examine the experience of American cultural groups in the development and management of Western natural resources. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Ethnic Studies XB21AC—A Comparative Survey of Racial and Ethnic Groups in the United States (4 units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XETHSTD
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Examine the historical experiences of European immigrants, African Americans and Latinos, emphasizing the themes of migration and economic change since the late-19th century. You will also learn about the experiences of Asian Americans, Native Americans and recently arrived immigrants in the context of the course themes. Throughout the course, discuss intragroup differences such as gender, socioeconomic stratification and cultural variation. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Film XB50—Film for Non-majors: California in the Cinematic Imagination (4 Units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XFILM
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Arts and Literature breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

This course examines how California has figured in the cinematic imagination as an industrial center and as a landscape of fantasy, site for the formulation and revision of national mythologies regarding the American West. We will assemble a cinematic history of the state –from the founding of the Spanish missions to the 21st century –while asking how filmmakers from D. W. Griffith to P. T. Anderson figure the California landscape as both wasteland and promised land, iconic backdrop for the examination of American national identity and politics, the construction of gender, and narratives of racial and class struggle. Texts will address the history of the state, the history of the film industry therein, and formal, narrative, and ideological analyses of the films that structure the course.

Geography XB30—The Ocean World (4 units)
Department: 
Biological Science
Physical Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XGEOG
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Either the Biological Science or the Physical Science category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Gain an introduction to the cultural and physical geography of the world's oceans. Topics include ecology of ocean biota and environments; history and geography of ocean peoples, cultures and resource use; problems confronting ocean peoples and environments; and new approaches to saving the oceans. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Geography XB50AC—California (4 units)
Department: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XGEOG
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences, American Cultures
Course Description: 

California had been called "the great exception" and "America, only more so." Yet few of us pay attention to its distinctive traits and to its effects beyond our borders. California may be "a state of mind," but it is also the most dynamic place in the most powerful country in the world, and would be the 8th largest economy if it were a country. Its wealth has been built on mining, agriculture, industry, trade, and finance. Natural abundance and geographic advantage have played their parts, but the state's greatest resource has been its wealth and diversity of people, who have made it a center of technological and cultural innovation from Hollywood to Silicon Valley. Yet California has a dark side of exploitation and racialization.

History XB7B (AC)—The United States From Civil War to Present (4 units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XHISTOR
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade.
Course Description: 

Examine the experiences and conflicts that comprise American society's history. You will be exposed to a wide range of historical actors and dialogues in order to understand the past, from the perspective of the men and women who experienced it and to gain some insight into the daily lives of Americans: work and leisure, cultures and ideologies, relations with one another, and the political and economic system under which they lived. Lectures and readings focus on the complex interplay among political, economic and cultural interests, and will examine, in particular depth, race relations, the laboring classes, reform movements, the interior of American lives, the changing conditions for success and survival in the culture Americans were shaping, and the emerging role of the United States as a world power. Three hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per week.

Integrative Biology XB31—The Ecology and Evolution of Animal Behavior (3 units)
Department: 
Biological Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XINTEGB
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Biological Science breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Learn about the principles of evolution biology as they relate to animal behavior and behavioral ecology with a broad coverage of animal groups. This course is designed for those not specializing in biology. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Legal Studies XBR1B—Reading and Composition in Connection With the Law as a Social Institution (4 units)
Enroll: 
second-half of R&C
Department Abbreviation: 
XLEGALS
Prerequisite: 

Completion of both the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement and the first-half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement.

Satisfies: 
The second-half (R1B portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

Develop your skills in critical reading, writing and analysis, and complete a series of essays culminating in a research paper relating to law, legal actors and legal institutions. Emphasis is placed on the process of writing, including developing research questions, constructing an argument and revising for content and style. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections
Legal Studies R1B-2
Democracy, Disobedience, and Resistance

Instructor: TBA

 

This reading and composition seminar takes its inspiration from the rich histories of protest and free speech in the San Francisco Bay Area. Over the course of the semester, we will consider such questions as: Do we – as citizens and residents of the United States – have an obligation to obey the laws enacted by our government? If democracy is understood to be government “by and for the people,” what do we owe to the state and our peers? Are we morally obligated to obey laws that we consider to be unjust? And, if the laws are indeed deemed unjust, what kinds of social protest, disobedience, and resistance are justified? To answer these questions, this course will engage with a range of classic and contemporary texts from philosophers, legal actors, and practitioners of disobedience on such themes as obligation, justice, non-violent versus violent action, coercion, responsibility, authority, and liberty. After considering foundational philosophical texts from thinkers like Plato, John Locke, and John Stuart Mill, we will devote significant time to analyzing tangible moments of democratically-oriented disobedience and resistance, including: the American Revolution (which will feature the popular musical Hamilton, the Federalist and Anti-Federalist Papers, and the 19th writings of Henry David Thoreau); the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s (which will draw from the speeches and writings of Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, and Berkeley’s own Mario Savio); the Feminist Movement (which will incorporate writings from historical figures like Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony as well as contemporary political and legal theorists like Catharine MacKinnon and Judith Butler); and the present (which will examine the Supreme Court’s decision in Citizens United, the Black Lives Matter movement, and popular responses to Donald Trump’s Executive Order to ban travel from Muslim-majority nations). Each of these moments will serve as “test cases” for thinking about expanding, altering, or otherwise rehabilitating the political and legal conditions of participatory and representative democracy. Where and when appropriate, students can expect to observe or analyze the coverage of protests occurring in San Francisco, Oakland, and Berkeley. This seminar is part of the On the Same Page program, recognizing the diverse and unique voices that contribute to the shaping of democratic life. For more, see: http://onthesamepage.berkeley.edu.

Linguistics XB55AC—The American Languages (4 units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XLINGUI
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Using a linguistic view of the history, society and culture of the United States, explore the variety of languages spoken in our country and the issues surrounding them: language and ethnicity, politics of linguistic pluralism versus societal monolingualism, language and education, language shift, loss, retention and renewal. Languages include English (standard and nonstandard, African-American English), pidgins and creoles, Native American languages, Spanish, French, and immigrant languages from Asia and Europe. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Mathematics XB16A—Analytic Geometry and Calculus (3 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XMATH
Examples of Intended Majors: 
Business Administration (Haas), Architecture, Economics, Public Health, Environmental Sciences
Prerequisite: 

Three years of high school mathematics, including trigonometry, plus a satisfactory grade in one of the following: CEEB MAT test, an AP test, the UC/CSU math diagnostic exam or Math 32. It is strongly recommended that you take 16A only if you have already completed precalculus. Students will not receive credit for 16A after taking 1A. Two units of Math 16A may be used to remove a deficient grade in Math 1A.

Satisfies: 
Quantitative Reasoning requirement if completed with a grade of C− or better. Some majors have specific grade requirements. Fulfills prerequisites for several social science majors.
Course Description: 

Math 16A covers much of the same basic topics as Math 1A, but does not include in-depth calculus and does not prepare you to continue on to Match 53 or 54. Math 16A introduces integration, the fundamental theorem of calculus, areas in the plane and other applications of the definite integral. This course is intended for students in the life and social sciences whose programs require only one year of calculus.Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Topics Covered: 
Functions, derivatives of simple functions, logarithms and exponentials, as well as applications of the derivative, including rate of change, techniques of graphing, optimization problems, related rates and differentials.
Skills Needed: 
  • Facility with a scientific calculator or graphing calculator may be required
    • Ability to determine the value of a complicated expression using a scientific or graphing calculator
  • Facility with fractions
    • Ability to simplify rational expressions and solve rational equations
  • Facility with algebra
    • Ability to solve linear equations
    • Ability to solve quadratic equations by factoring, completing the square and using the quadratic formula
    • Ability to solve a linear system of equations
  • Facility with graphing
    • Ability to identify and plot points on the Cartesian plane
    • Ability to graph lines
  • Facility with exponential and logarithmic functions
    • Familiarity with e and natural logarithms
    • Ability to simplify expressions containing logarithms
    • Ability to solve logarithmic equations
    • Ability to graph exponential and logarithmic functions
  • Facility with trigonometry
    • Familiarity with radian measure
    • Ability to compute trigonometric functions of simple angles
    • Ability to use the Pythagorean Theorem
    • Ability to solve triangle using the Law of Sines or the Law of Cosines
  • Knowledge of addition formula for sine and cosine
Mathematics XB1A—Calculus (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XMATH
Examples of Intended Majors: 
Physical Sciences, Engineering, Mathematics, Computer Sciences, Molecular and Cell Biology, Economics, Astronomy, Chemistry, Geology, Statistics
Prerequisite: 

Three-and-a-half years of high school mathematics, including trigonometry and analytic geometry, plus a satisfactory grade in one of the following: CEEB MAT test, an AP test, the UC/CSU math diagnostic test or Math 32. It is strongly recommended that you take 1A only if you have already completed precalculus.

Satisfies: 
Quantitative Reasoning requirement if completed with a grade of C− or better. Some majors have specific grade requirements. Students will not receive credit for 1A after taking 16B and 2 units after taking 16A. Math 1A is required to continue on to Math 53 or 54 and are prerequisites for physical science, computer science and math majors. Life science majors also accept this series.
Course Description: 

Math 1A covers the topics of calculus of one variable, mainly with derivatives, and applications such as graphing and optimization. It introduces the idea of integration and applications such as volumes of revolution. Students are expected to understand some theorems and their proofs. This rigorous course emphasizes conceptual understanding and is intended for students in engineering and physical sciences. Three hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per week.

Topics Covered: 
Intuitive and precise limit definitions, continuity, definition of the derivative, shortcut rules for finding derivatives, product rule, quotient rule, chain rule, implicit differentiation, related rates, linear approximations and differentials, mean value theorem, L'Hopital's rule, curve sketching, optimization, Newton's Method, definition of Riemann integral, Fundamental Theorem of Calculus (Parts 1 and 2), natural logarithm defined as an integral, area between two curves, volumes of solids of revolution.
Skills Needed: 
  • Facility with a scientific calculator or graphing calculator may be required
    • Ability to determine the value of a complicated expression using a scientific or graphing calculator
  • Facility with fractions
    • Ability to simplify rational expressions and solve rational equations
  • Facility with algebra
    • Ability to solve linear equations
    • Ability to solve quadratic equations by factoring, completing the square and using the quadratic formula
    • Ability to solve a linear system of equations
  • Facility with graphing
    • Ability to identify and plot points on the Cartesian plane
    • Ability to graph lines
  • Facility with exponential and logarithmic functions
    • Familiarity with e and natural logarithms
    • Ability to simplify expressions containing logarithms
    • Ability to solve logarithmic equations
      • Ability to graph exponential and logarithmic functions
  • Facility with trigonometry
    • Familiarity with radian measure
    • Ability to compute trigonometric functions of simple angles
    • Ability to use the Pythagorean Theorem
    • Ability to solve triangle using the Law of Sines or the Law of Cosines
    • Knowledge of addition formula for sine and cosine
Mathematics XB1B—Calculus (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XMATH
Examples of Intended Majors: 
Physical Sciences, Engineering, Mathematics, Computer Sciences, Molecular and Cell Biology, Economics, Astronomy, Chemistry, Geology, Statistics
Prerequisite: 

Math 1A or equivalent coursework; please check Assist.org or with the Office of Undergraduate Admissions to make sure your coursework is equivalent to UC Berkeley's Math 1A.

Satisfies: 
Quantitative Reasoning requirement if completed with a grade of C− or better. Some majors have specific grade requirements. Students taking 1B after 16B receive only 2 units for 1B. Math 1B is required to continue on to Math 53 or 54 and are prerequisites for physical science, computer science and math majors. Life science majors also accept this series.
Course Description: 

Math 1B is a continuation of Math 1A. It involves integration techniques and applications and introduces infinite series and first- and second-order differential equations and their uses. It is intended for students with majors in engineering, math and some sciences. Three hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per week.

Topics Covered: 
Integration by parts; trigonometric integrals; trigonometric substitution; partial fractions; midpoint, trapezoid and Simpson’s rules; improper integrals; arc length; area of a surface of revolution; sequences and series; integral test; comparison tests; alternating series; ratio test; root test; power series; Taylor series; binomial series; modeling with differential equations; direction fields; Euler’s method; separable equations; exponential growth and decay; logistic equation; linear differential equations; homogeneous and nonhomogeneous second-order linear differential equations and their applications; series solutions for second-order differential equations.
Skills Needed: 
  • Facility with a scientific calculator or graphing calculator may be required
    • Ability to determine the value of a complicated expression using a scientific or graphing calculator
  • Facility with fractions
    • Ability to simplify rational expressions and solve rational equations
  • Facility with algebra
    • Ability to solve linear equations
    • Ability to solve quadratic equations by factoring, completing the square and using the quadratic formula
    • Ability to solve a linear system of equations
  • Facility with graphing
    • Ability to identify and plot points on the Cartesian plane
    • Ability to graph lines
  • Facility with exponential and logarithmic functions
    • Familiarity with e and natural logarithms
    • Ability to simplify expressions containing logarithms
    • Ability to solve logarithmic equations
    • Ability to graph exponential and logarithmic functions
  • Facility with trigonometry
    • Familiarity with radian measure
    • Ability to compute trigonometric functions of simple angles
    • Ability to use the Pythagorean Theorem
    • Ability to solve triangle using the Law of Sines or the Law of Cosines
    • Knowledge of addition formula for sine and cosine
  • Facility with differentiation
    • Knowledge that a derivative can be interpreted as a rate of change or the slope of a tangent line
    • Ability to compute the derivative of elementary functions
    • Ability to use the product, quotient and chain rules
    • Ability to differentiate implicitly
  • Facility with integration
    • Ability to compute volumes of solids of revolution
    • Ability to integrate using u-substitution
Mathematics XB32—Precalculus (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XMATH
Examples of Intended Majors: 
Any major that requires Math 16A or Math 1A
Prerequisite: 

Three years of high school mathematics and at least a score of 560 on the SAT I Math portion. Email fpf@berkeley.edu if you need to take math but have scored below a 560 on the SAT I.

Satisfies: 
Quantitative Reasoning requirement if completed with a grade of C− or better. Some majors have specific grade requirements. You will not receive credit for Math XB32 after taking Math 1A–1B or 16A–16B and will receive 3 units after taking Math 96.
Course Description: 

This course is designed for students who wish to prepare for calculus. It covers exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometry, complex numbers, binomial theorem, conics and analytic geometry. Three hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per week.

Topics Covered: 
Factoring polynomials, quadratic equations, equations of lines, symmetry and graphs, one-dimensional inequalities, definition and graph of a function, techniques of graphing, composition of functions, inverse of a function, linear functions, quadratic functions, polynomial functions, rational functions, quadratic optimization problems, exponential and logarithmic functions, properties of logarithms, equations and inequalities with logarithms, compound interest, exponential growth and decay, trigonometric functions, right triangle applications, trigonometric identities, radian measure of angles, graphs of the six trigonometric functions, addition formula for trigonometric functions, double angle formulas, product-to-sum and sum-to-product formulas, trigonometric equations, inverse trigonometric functions, law of sines, law of cosines, vectors, parametric equations and polar coordinates.
Skills Needed: 
  • Facility with a scientific calculator or graphing calculator may be required
    • Ability to determine the value of a complicated expression using a scientific or graphing calculator
  • Facility with fractions
    • Ability to simplify rational expressions and solve rational equations
  • Facility with algebra
    • Ability to solve linear equations
    • Ability to solve quadratic equations by factoring, completing the square and using the quadratic formula
    • Ability to solve a linear system of equations
  • Facility with graphing
    • Ability to identify and plot points on the Cartesian plane
    • Ability to graph lines
Molecular and Cell Biology XB32—Introduction to Human Physiology (3 units)
Department: 
Biological Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XMCELLB
Prerequisite: 

One year of high school or college chemistry

Satisfies: 
Biological Science breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

You gain a comprehensive introduction to human cell biology by concentrating on basic mechanisms underlying human life processes, including cells and membranes; nerve and muscle function; cardiovascular, respiratory, renal and gastrointestinal physiology; and metabolism, endocrinology and reproduction. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Music XB27—Introduction to Western Music (4 units)
Department: 
Arts and Literature
Department Abbreviation: 
XMUSIC
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Arts and Literature breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

This course is devoted to the development of listening skills and appreciation of the major forms of Western art music. It is not intended for music majors. The guided listening, lectures and discussions present music as a language in which students can develop a basic fluency. The recorded music used in the course covers the gamut of Western art music from the Renaissance to the present day. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Philosophy XB2—Individual Morality and Social Justice (4 units)
Department: 
Philosophy and Values
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XPHILOS
Prerequisite: 

None; however, this is a writing- and reading-intensive course, and students' writing skills should exceed the College Writing course level.

Satisfies: 
Either the Philosophy and Values or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Survey the basic questions of moral and political philosophy and some important attempts to answer them, with particular attention to topical issues (abortion, the ethics of eating animals and gay marriage, for example). What is the moral thing to do with respect to these issues? Is there a fact of the matter what the moral thing to do is, or does it depend on one's feelings, upbringing or culture? Why should we do what is morally right? Why should we tolerate alien moral beliefs and practices? What role should governments play? Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Political Science XB1—Introduction to American Politics (4 units)
Department: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XPOLXCI
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade.
Course Description: 

Get an introductory analysis of the structure and operations of the American political system, primarily at the national level. Three hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per week.

Psychology XB1—General Psychology (3 units)
Department: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XPSYCH
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Examine a representative sample of topics in psychology, including the operation of neurons and the brain; animal behavior; sensory and perceptual processes; obedience to authority; and theories of personality, mental disorders and psychotherapy. Topics also include the history of psychology (with brief readings from Plato, Darwin, James, Freud and Watson), recent ideas about the role of consciousness in cognition and computer modeling of cognitive processes. Two hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Rhetoric XB2—Fundamentals of Public Speaking (2 units)
Department: 
Electives
Department Abbreviation: 
XRHETOR
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Electives do not fulfill University or breadth requirements, but are great opportunities to enrich your schedule in areas you find interesting.
Course Description: 

Gain help in establishing and developing basic competence in the skills required for effective oral presentations, whether prepared in advance or spontaneous. You cover formulating a clear communicative intent, basic principles of communication and theories of persuasion, organization of presentation material, delivery, use of visual aids and response to audience questions. You make six different oral presentations during the term, with ample opportunity for ungraded practice and coaching prior to evaluation. Three hours of class per week. This course is offered only on a Passed/Not Passed basis. Although this course does not satisfy a College of Letters and Science breadth requirement, units are granted.

Rhetoric XBR1A—The Craft of Writing: San Francisco Campus (4 units)
Enroll: 
first-half of R&C
Department Abbreviation: 
XRHETOR
Prerequisite: 

Completion of the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement or UC Analytical Writing Placement Exam

Satisfies: 
The first-half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

Learn the principles of argumentative writing and emphasizes close readings of texts that reveal their rhetorical structure and intended audience. You learn to identify and interpret a text's thesis and intention and make compelling arguments for your position using textual evidence. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections 
Rhetoric R1A-5
San Francisco: Reverberations of the 1960's

Instructor: Lempert

 

In popular histories of San Francisco, so much of the city’s identity – the town’s progressive politics, its embrace of all things strange and funky, even its current status as the epicenter of technological innovation – traces its roots back to the 1960’s. (We could extend this history to Berkeley, too, which still leads the nation in tie-dyes per capita.) To be fair, there is some truth here. The hippies, the Black Panthers, the techo-utopians, the burnouts, Asian American literature, LGBTQ activism, even the still-lingering smells of incense and patchouli: all rightfully come from the 1960’s.  Yet to read San Francisco only through the 1960’s papers over so much more. The Beatniks of the 1950’s – famous for hanging out in North Beach – shared little of the hope of their hippie offspring. The 1970’s saw widespread disillusionment and paranoia. Even the Gold Rush of 1849 built SF up not as a place of love and peace, but as a place to get rich quick. (Sound familiar?) Today, widespread gentrification and the exodus of minority populations has the city wondering if it’s still the place people long dreamed about coming to.  In this class, we’ll examine this complicated legacy, that of the 1960’s on San Francisco. We’ll look at what came before and what after. We’ll ask what SF has meant at different times and to different sorts of demographics, cultures, and identities. We’ll read novels, poems, and essays, listen to a bunch of music, watch at least one film, and go on a field trip or two.  As this is a college writing class, we’ll also spend plenty of time on writing and argumentation, working on various problems of interpretation, style, clarity, flow, interest, cohesion and analysis. It will be great.

Rhetoric R1A-6, R1A-7
Archaeological Readers: Rhetorically Excavating Issues through Close Reading, Critical Thinking, Argumentative Writing

Instructor: Borst-Rothe

 

Most incoming students are not prepared for the expected level of critical thinking writing, and speaking--skills important at the university and in professional settings. This course will focus on the Rhetorical Framework: identifying critical issues in different disciplines, analyzing style and structure in different arguments, and learning to argue logically and persuasively about authorial intention using textual evidence. Two units focus on the importance of California: one related to the rhetoric of place as a California dream, the other illustrating California's importance in the arts for visual artists, writers, film makers, and photographers. Just as important are units focusing on critical contemporary issues ranging from issues in healthcare to mass incarceration. You'll also have a change to explore the museums (SFMOMA or Berkeley's BAMPFA) as an experiential option in the Art Unit. All writing assignments will focus on modern-day application of classical rhetorical structure, applicable to any field of study, just as brief presentations will help you practice professional speaking. And class discussion, small group work, as well as seminar-style participation will open up the value, the excitement of translating your ideas into clear persuasive arguments, not mere opinions, that you as the next generation of leaders will need. I look forward to taking this archaeological journey with you!

Rhetoric XBR1B—The Craft of Writing: San Francisco Campus (4 units)
Enroll: 
second-half of R&C
Department Abbreviation: 
: XRHETOR
Prerequisite: 

Completion of both the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement and the first-half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement

Satisfies: 
The second-half (R1B portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

Get further instruction in argumentative writing and focus on intensive argumentative writing drawn from controversy stimulated through selected readings and class discussion. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections 
Rhetoric R1B-3
San Francisco: Reverberations of the 1960's

Instructor: Lempert

 

In popular histories of San Francisco, so much of the city’s identity – the town’s progressive politics, its embrace of all things strange and funky, even its current status as the epicenter of technological innovation – traces its roots back to the 1960’s. (We could extend this history to Berkeley, too, which still leads the nation in tie-dyes per capita.) To be fair, there is some truth here. The hippies, the Black Panthers, the techo-utopians, the burnouts, Asian American literature, LGBTQ activism, even the still-lingering smells of incense and patchouli: all rightfully come from the 1960’s.  Yet to read San Francisco only through the 1960’s papers over so much more. The Beatniks of the 1950’s – famous for hanging out in North Beach – shared little of the hope of their hippie offspring. The 1970’s saw widespread disillusionment and paranoia. Even the Gold Rush of 1849 built SF up not as a place of love and peace, but as a place to get rich quick. (Sound familiar?) Today, widespread gentrification and the exodus of minority populations has the city wondering if it’s still the place people long dreamed about coming to.  In this class, we’ll examine this complicated legacy, that of the 1960’s on San Francisco. We’ll look at what came before and what after. We’ll ask what SF has meant at different times and to different sorts of demographics, cultures, and identities. We’ll read novels, poems, and essays, listen to a bunch of music, watch at least one film, and go on a field trip or two.  As this is a college writing class, we’ll also spend plenty of time on writing and argumentation, working on various problems of interpretation, style, clarity, flow, interest, cohesion and analysis. It will be great.

Sociology XB3AC—Principles of Sociology: American Cultures (4 units)
Department: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XSOCIOL
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and the Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Comparing the experience of three out of five ethnic groups (i.e., African Americans, Asian Americans, Chicanos/Latinos, European Americans and Native Americans), you examine historically how each people entered American society and built communities and transformed their cultures in the process. Gain an introduction to the sociological perspective; characteristic methods of research; and key concepts such as culture, community, class, race, social change and social movements. Three hours of lecture per week.

Statistics XB2—Introduction to Statistics (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XSTAT
Examples of Intended Majors: 
Psychology, Political Economy, Development Studies, Legal Studies, Nutritional Science: Dietetics, Nutritional Science: Physiology and Metabolism
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Quantitative Reasoning requirement if completed with a grade of C− or better. Some majors have specific grade requirements. Statistics 2 fulfills prerequisites for some social science majors, such as psychology. It does not fulfill prerequisites for the economics major, statistics major or the Haas Undergraduate Business Program.
Course Description: 

This course introduces basic concepts of probability and statistical inference and covers standard methods for making inferences about populations from information contained in sample data: the methods used in sample surveys, opinion polls, research studies and industry. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Topics Covered: 
Populations, statistics, variables, observational studies versus experiments, graphs of data, descriptive measures of location and spread, normal approximation, correlation, the regression line, Simpson’s paradox, probability, binomial and normal distributions, and the behavior of the average of samples, as well as inference methods such as estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis tests for averages and percentages, and the chi-square test.
Skills Needed: 
  • Facility with a scientific calculator or graphing calculator may be required
    • Ability to determine the value of a complicated expression using a scientific or graphing calculator
  • Facility with fractions
    • Ability to simplify rational expressions and solve rational equations
  • Facility with algebra
    • Ability to solve linear equations
    • Ability to solve quadratic equations by factoring, completing the square and using the quadratic formula
    • Ability to solve a linear system of equations
  • Facility with graphing
    • Ability to identify and plot points on the Cartesian plane
    • Ability to graph lines

Breadth Courses

The College of Letters and Science Seven-Course Breadth requirement and American Cultures Breadth requirement are the foundation of the college's liberal arts program. It can only be fulfilled with college coursework; AP exams and other high school work do not count toward this requirement.

= Courses that also fulfill the American Cultures requirement

Arts and Literature

Music XB27—Introduction to Western Music (4 units)
Department: 
Arts and Literature
Department Abbreviation: 
XMUSIC
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Arts and Literature breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

This course is devoted to the development of listening skills and appreciation of the major forms of Western art music. It is not intended for music majors. The guided listening, lectures and discussions present music as a language in which students can develop a basic fluency. The recorded music used in the course covers the gamut of Western art music from the Renaissance to the present day. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Biological Science

Geography XB30—The Ocean World (4 units)
Department: 
Biological Science
Physical Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XGEOG
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Either the Biological Science or the Physical Science category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Gain an introduction to the cultural and physical geography of the world's oceans. Topics include ecology of ocean biota and environments; history and geography of ocean peoples, cultures and resource use; problems confronting ocean peoples and environments; and new approaches to saving the oceans. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Molecular and Cell Biology XB32—Introduction to Human Physiology (3 units)
Department: 
Biological Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XMCELLB
Prerequisite: 

One year of high school or college chemistry

Satisfies: 
Biological Science breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

You gain a comprehensive introduction to human cell biology by concentrating on basic mechanisms underlying human life processes, including cells and membranes; nerve and muscle function; cardiovascular, respiratory, renal and gastrointestinal physiology; and metabolism, endocrinology and reproduction. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Integrative Biology XB31—The Ecology and Evolution of Animal Behavior (3 units)
Department: 
Biological Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XINTEGB
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Biological Science breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Learn about the principles of evolution biology as they relate to animal behavior and behavioral ecology with a broad coverage of animal groups. This course is designed for those not specializing in biology. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Historical Studies

Ethnic Studies XB21AC—A Comparative Survey of Racial and Ethnic Groups in the United States (4 units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XETHSTD
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Examine the historical experiences of European immigrants, African Americans and Latinos, emphasizing the themes of migration and economic change since the late-19th century. You will also learn about the experiences of Asian Americans, Native Americans and recently arrived immigrants in the context of the course themes. Throughout the course, discuss intragroup differences such as gender, socioeconomic stratification and cultural variation. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Linguistics XB55AC—The American Languages (4 units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XLINGUI
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Using a linguistic view of the history, society and culture of the United States, explore the variety of languages spoken in our country and the issues surrounding them: language and ethnicity, politics of linguistic pluralism versus societal monolingualism, language and education, language shift, loss, retention and renewal. Languages include English (standard and nonstandard, African-American English), pidgins and creoles, Native American languages, Spanish, French, and immigrant languages from Asia and Europe. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Anthropology XB2AC—Introduction to Archaeology (4 Units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XANTHRO
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the HIstorical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade.
Course Description: 

Gain an introduction to the discipline of anthropological archaeology with a special emphasis on how archaeology contributes to our understanding of American society and the cultures from which it is drawn. You will learn about the methods, goals and theoretical concepts of archaeology, with attention to the impact archaeology has had on the construction of the histories of diverse communities, such as Native Americans, African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos and European Americans. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

History XB7B (AC)—The United States From Civil War to Present (4 units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XHISTOR
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade.
Course Description: 

Examine the experiences and conflicts that comprise American society's history. You will be exposed to a wide range of historical actors and dialogues in order to understand the past, from the perspective of the men and women who experienced it and to gain some insight into the daily lives of Americans: work and leisure, cultures and ideologies, relations with one another, and the political and economic system under which they lived. Lectures and readings focus on the complex interplay among political, economic and cultural interests, and will examine, in particular depth, race relations, the laboring classes, reform movements, the interior of American lives, the changing conditions for success and survival in the culture Americans were shaping, and the emerging role of the United States as a world power. Three hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per week.

Environmental Science Policy and Management XB50AC - Introduction to Culture and Natural Resource Management (4 units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Philosophy and Values
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XESPM
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies, Philosophy and Values, or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Learn how culture affects the way we use and manage fire, wildlands and urban forests, rangelands, parks and preserves, and croplands in America. The basic concepts and tools for evaluating the role of culture in resource use and management are introduced and used to examine the experience of American cultural groups in the development and management of Western natural resources. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Philosophy and Values

Philosophy XB2—Individual Morality and Social Justice (4 units)
Department: 
Philosophy and Values
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XPHILOS
Prerequisite: 

None; however, this is a writing- and reading-intensive course, and students' writing skills should exceed the College Writing course level.

Satisfies: 
Either the Philosophy and Values or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Survey the basic questions of moral and political philosophy and some important attempts to answer them, with particular attention to topical issues (abortion, the ethics of eating animals and gay marriage, for example). What is the moral thing to do with respect to these issues? Is there a fact of the matter what the moral thing to do is, or does it depend on one's feelings, upbringing or culture? Why should we do what is morally right? Why should we tolerate alien moral beliefs and practices? What role should governments play? Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Environmental Science Policy and Management XB50AC - Introduction to Culture and Natural Resource Management (4 units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Philosophy and Values
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XESPM
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies, Philosophy and Values, or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Learn how culture affects the way we use and manage fire, wildlands and urban forests, rangelands, parks and preserves, and croplands in America. The basic concepts and tools for evaluating the role of culture in resource use and management are introduced and used to examine the experience of American cultural groups in the development and management of Western natural resources. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Physical Science

Geography XB30—The Ocean World (4 units)
Department: 
Biological Science
Physical Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XGEOG
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Either the Biological Science or the Physical Science category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Gain an introduction to the cultural and physical geography of the world's oceans. Topics include ecology of ocean biota and environments; history and geography of ocean peoples, cultures and resource use; problems confronting ocean peoples and environments; and new approaches to saving the oceans. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Earth and Planetary Science (Geology) XB80—Environmental Earth Sciences: Soils (3 units)
Department: 
Physical Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XEPS
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Physical Science breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Ask just about any group of people for a list of global environmental problems and they are likely to respond with the latest topics featured on the evening news – severe storms, global warming, climate change, sea level rise, melting of the polar ice caps, eco-terrorism, destruction of the rainforests, loss of biodiversity, and so on.  Yet curiously missing from almost every list is the shrinking supply of topsoil worldwide. Often taken for granted and viewed as a limitless resource, soil is, in fact, in limited supply. Many international organizations now place soil loss as the single most critical global environmental issue followed closely by an adequate supply of water to quench the thirst of the world’s burgeoning population. We will use an interdisciplinary exploration of soils to frame our broader understanding of the integration of Earth systems and their relationship to environmental issues globally. This is an applied, hands-on course designed to provide students with a general understanding of Earth systems and how they interact. Be prepared to roll up your sleeves, get your hands dirty, and maybe your feet wet. The goal of this course is to prompt you to initiate environmental change through a better understanding of the ground beneath your feet. Change starts from the ground up! Three hours of lecture per week.

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Ethnic Studies XB21AC—A Comparative Survey of Racial and Ethnic Groups in the United States (4 units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XETHSTD
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Examine the historical experiences of European immigrants, African Americans and Latinos, emphasizing the themes of migration and economic change since the late-19th century. You will also learn about the experiences of Asian Americans, Native Americans and recently arrived immigrants in the context of the course themes. Throughout the course, discuss intragroup differences such as gender, socioeconomic stratification and cultural variation. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Linguistics XB55AC—The American Languages (4 units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XLINGUI
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Using a linguistic view of the history, society and culture of the United States, explore the variety of languages spoken in our country and the issues surrounding them: language and ethnicity, politics of linguistic pluralism versus societal monolingualism, language and education, language shift, loss, retention and renewal. Languages include English (standard and nonstandard, African-American English), pidgins and creoles, Native American languages, Spanish, French, and immigrant languages from Asia and Europe. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Philosophy XB2—Individual Morality and Social Justice (4 units)
Department: 
Philosophy and Values
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XPHILOS
Prerequisite: 

None; however, this is a writing- and reading-intensive course, and students' writing skills should exceed the College Writing course level.

Satisfies: 
Either the Philosophy and Values or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Survey the basic questions of moral and political philosophy and some important attempts to answer them, with particular attention to topical issues (abortion, the ethics of eating animals and gay marriage, for example). What is the moral thing to do with respect to these issues? Is there a fact of the matter what the moral thing to do is, or does it depend on one's feelings, upbringing or culture? Why should we do what is morally right? Why should we tolerate alien moral beliefs and practices? What role should governments play? Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Psychology XB1—General Psychology (3 units)
Department: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XPSYCH
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Examine a representative sample of topics in psychology, including the operation of neurons and the brain; animal behavior; sensory and perceptual processes; obedience to authority; and theories of personality, mental disorders and psychotherapy. Topics also include the history of psychology (with brief readings from Plato, Darwin, James, Freud and Watson), recent ideas about the role of consciousness in cognition and computer modeling of cognitive processes. Two hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Sociology XB3AC—Principles of Sociology: American Cultures (4 units)
Department: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XSOCIOL
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and the Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Comparing the experience of three out of five ethnic groups (i.e., African Americans, Asian Americans, Chicanos/Latinos, European Americans and Native Americans), you examine historically how each people entered American society and built communities and transformed their cultures in the process. Gain an introduction to the sociological perspective; characteristic methods of research; and key concepts such as culture, community, class, race, social change and social movements. Three hours of lecture per week.

Anthropology XB2AC—Introduction to Archaeology (4 Units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XANTHRO
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the HIstorical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade.
Course Description: 

Gain an introduction to the discipline of anthropological archaeology with a special emphasis on how archaeology contributes to our understanding of American society and the cultures from which it is drawn. You will learn about the methods, goals and theoretical concepts of archaeology, with attention to the impact archaeology has had on the construction of the histories of diverse communities, such as Native Americans, African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos and European Americans. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

History XB7B (AC)—The United States From Civil War to Present (4 units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XHISTOR
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade.
Course Description: 

Examine the experiences and conflicts that comprise American society's history. You will be exposed to a wide range of historical actors and dialogues in order to understand the past, from the perspective of the men and women who experienced it and to gain some insight into the daily lives of Americans: work and leisure, cultures and ideologies, relations with one another, and the political and economic system under which they lived. Lectures and readings focus on the complex interplay among political, economic and cultural interests, and will examine, in particular depth, race relations, the laboring classes, reform movements, the interior of American lives, the changing conditions for success and survival in the culture Americans were shaping, and the emerging role of the United States as a world power. Three hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per week.

Political Science XB1—Introduction to American Politics (4 units)
Department: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XPOLXCI
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade.
Course Description: 

Get an introductory analysis of the structure and operations of the American political system, primarily at the national level. Three hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per week.

Geography XB50AC—California (4 units)
Department: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XGEOG
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences, American Cultures
Course Description: 

California had been called "the great exception" and "America, only more so." Yet few of us pay attention to its distinctive traits and to its effects beyond our borders. California may be "a state of mind," but it is also the most dynamic place in the most powerful country in the world, and would be the 8th largest economy if it were a country. Its wealth has been built on mining, agriculture, industry, trade, and finance. Natural abundance and geographic advantage have played their parts, but the state's greatest resource has been its wealth and diversity of people, who have made it a center of technological and cultural innovation from Hollywood to Silicon Valley. Yet California has a dark side of exploitation and racialization.

Environmental Science Policy and Management XB50AC - Introduction to Culture and Natural Resource Management (4 units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Philosophy and Values
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XESPM
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies, Philosophy and Values, or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Learn how culture affects the way we use and manage fire, wildlands and urban forests, rangelands, parks and preserves, and croplands in America. The basic concepts and tools for evaluating the role of culture in resource use and management are introduced and used to examine the experience of American cultural groups in the development and management of Western natural resources. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Electives

Rhetoric XB2—Fundamentals of Public Speaking (2 units)
Department: 
Electives
Department Abbreviation: 
XRHETOR
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Electives do not fulfill University or breadth requirements, but are great opportunities to enrich your schedule in areas you find interesting.
Course Description: 

Gain help in establishing and developing basic competence in the skills required for effective oral presentations, whether prepared in advance or spontaneous. You cover formulating a clear communicative intent, basic principles of communication and theories of persuasion, organization of presentation material, delivery, use of visual aids and response to audience questions. You make six different oral presentations during the term, with ample opportunity for ungraded practice and coaching prior to evaluation. Three hours of class per week. This course is offered only on a Passed/Not Passed basis. Although this course does not satisfy a College of Letters and Science breadth requirement, units are granted.

Art XB98—Visits & Observations: Investigating Bay Area Art (2 Units)
Department: 
Electives
Department Abbreviation: 
XART
Prerequisite: 

None

Course Description: 

Through instruction, structured visits to museums, art galleries, and artist studios, observational journal assignments, group discussion, individualized projects and group critiques, students will learn to visually respond to the world around them. This will occur in transit to locations, the locations themselves, and in the studio. Using their visual journals to track their thought processes during our visits students will learn to observe and respond to a variety of visual sources. These observations will be the catalyst for individualized studio projects that will occur a week after our visits. Students will question the boundaries of where an artistic experience begins and ends while learning where art and inspiration might exist within their community and direct surroundings and how to apply that to their own artistic vision.

Art XB98—Symbolic and Practical: Art and Social Justice (2 Units)
Department: 
Electives
Department Abbreviation: 
XART
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Electives do not fulfill University or breadth requirements, but are great opportunities to enrich your schedule in areas you find interesting.
Course Description: 

Artists have long made works that address issues of justice, equity, freedom and oppression. These works, and the strategies artists employ, are frequently informed by, produced through or in dialogue with social movements that seek to alter the conditions of society. The relationship between art and social movements raises questions about what it means to do art and what it means to do social justice. In order to explore the overlaps, tensions, and distinctions between the symbolic and practical practices of artists and social movements, this course combines student experimentation, readings, videos, discussion and site visits throughout the San Francisco Bay Area.

African American Studies XB98—Homegrown Hip Hop (2 Units)
Department: 
Electives
Department Abbreviation: 
XAFRICAM
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
This course is an elective.
Course Description: 

From its inception, Hip Hop has been (and continues to be) more than just a genre of music. Hip Hop has always served as an umbrella term encompassing art, music, dance, literature, identity, style, entrepreneurship and politics. This course will utilize an interactive and multi-media approach to engaging with Hip Hop Culture in the Bay Area. As the course will deal with contemporary Hip Hop culture in the Bay Area, it will also focus on the regional influences underpinning the Bay Area's distinct Hip-Hop landscape. We will also make it a point to deconstruct the multiple eras of Hip-Hop/rap in the Bay Area, and critically appraise the content contained in Bay Area Hip Hop records. It bears repeating, Hip-Hop culture is not only a source of entertainment within our everyday lives, but also a medium that analyzes/provides commentary regarding social, economic, political and cultural issues dealing with cultural identity, cultural genocide, misogyny, racism, classism, materialism, freedom of speech and freedom of sexuality. During the duration of this semester we will think critically, embrace debate, and delve into the study of Hip Hop culture. 

Pending Academic Senate Approval

Film XB50—Film for Non-majors: California in the Cinematic Imagination (4 Units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XFILM
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Arts and Literature breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

This course examines how California has figured in the cinematic imagination as an industrial center and as a landscape of fantasy, site for the formulation and revision of national mythologies regarding the American West. We will assemble a cinematic history of the state –from the founding of the Spanish missions to the 21st century –while asking how filmmakers from D. W. Griffith to P. T. Anderson figure the California landscape as both wasteland and promised land, iconic backdrop for the examination of American national identity and politics, the construction of gender, and narratives of racial and class struggle. Texts will address the history of the state, the history of the film industry therein, and formal, narrative, and ideological analyses of the films that structure the course.

Your Math and Statistics Courses

You may have already fulfilled the L&S Quantitative Reasoning requirement, but your intended major(s) may require math courses. 

Mathematics XB32—Precalculus (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XMATH
Examples of Intended Majors: 
Any major that requires Math 16A or Math 1A
Prerequisite: 

Three years of high school mathematics and at least a score of 560 on the SAT I Math portion. Email fpf@berkeley.edu if you need to take math but have scored below a 560 on the SAT I.

Satisfies: 
Quantitative Reasoning requirement if completed with a grade of C− or better. Some majors have specific grade requirements. You will not receive credit for Math XB32 after taking Math 1A–1B or 16A–16B and will receive 3 units after taking Math 96.
Course Description: 

This course is designed for students who wish to prepare for calculus. It covers exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometry, complex numbers, binomial theorem, conics and analytic geometry. Three hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per week.

Topics Covered: 
Factoring polynomials, quadratic equations, equations of lines, symmetry and graphs, one-dimensional inequalities, definition and graph of a function, techniques of graphing, composition of functions, inverse of a function, linear functions, quadratic functions, polynomial functions, rational functions, quadratic optimization problems, exponential and logarithmic functions, properties of logarithms, equations and inequalities with logarithms, compound interest, exponential growth and decay, trigonometric functions, right triangle applications, trigonometric identities, radian measure of angles, graphs of the six trigonometric functions, addition formula for trigonometric functions, double angle formulas, product-to-sum and sum-to-product formulas, trigonometric equations, inverse trigonometric functions, law of sines, law of cosines, vectors, parametric equations and polar coordinates.
Skills Needed: 
  • Facility with a scientific calculator or graphing calculator may be required
    • Ability to determine the value of a complicated expression using a scientific or graphing calculator
  • Facility with fractions
    • Ability to simplify rational expressions and solve rational equations
  • Facility with algebra
    • Ability to solve linear equations
    • Ability to solve quadratic equations by factoring, completing the square and using the quadratic formula
    • Ability to solve a linear system of equations
  • Facility with graphing
    • Ability to identify and plot points on the Cartesian plane
    • Ability to graph lines
Mathematics XB16A—Analytic Geometry and Calculus (3 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XMATH
Examples of Intended Majors: 
Business Administration (Haas), Architecture, Economics, Public Health, Environmental Sciences
Prerequisite: 

Three years of high school mathematics, including trigonometry, plus a satisfactory grade in one of the following: CEEB MAT test, an AP test, the UC/CSU math diagnostic exam or Math 32. It is strongly recommended that you take 16A only if you have already completed precalculus. Students will not receive credit for 16A after taking 1A. Two units of Math 16A may be used to remove a deficient grade in Math 1A.

Satisfies: 
Quantitative Reasoning requirement if completed with a grade of C− or better. Some majors have specific grade requirements. Fulfills prerequisites for several social science majors.
Course Description: 

Math 16A covers much of the same basic topics as Math 1A, but does not include in-depth calculus and does not prepare you to continue on to Match 53 or 54. Math 16A introduces integration, the fundamental theorem of calculus, areas in the plane and other applications of the definite integral. This course is intended for students in the life and social sciences whose programs require only one year of calculus.Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Topics Covered: 
Functions, derivatives of simple functions, logarithms and exponentials, as well as applications of the derivative, including rate of change, techniques of graphing, optimization problems, related rates and differentials.
Skills Needed: 
  • Facility with a scientific calculator or graphing calculator may be required
    • Ability to determine the value of a complicated expression using a scientific or graphing calculator
  • Facility with fractions
    • Ability to simplify rational expressions and solve rational equations
  • Facility with algebra
    • Ability to solve linear equations
    • Ability to solve quadratic equations by factoring, completing the square and using the quadratic formula
    • Ability to solve a linear system of equations
  • Facility with graphing
    • Ability to identify and plot points on the Cartesian plane
    • Ability to graph lines
  • Facility with exponential and logarithmic functions
    • Familiarity with e and natural logarithms
    • Ability to simplify expressions containing logarithms
    • Ability to solve logarithmic equations
    • Ability to graph exponential and logarithmic functions
  • Facility with trigonometry
    • Familiarity with radian measure
    • Ability to compute trigonometric functions of simple angles
    • Ability to use the Pythagorean Theorem
    • Ability to solve triangle using the Law of Sines or the Law of Cosines
  • Knowledge of addition formula for sine and cosine
Mathematics XB1A—Calculus (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XMATH
Examples of Intended Majors: 
Physical Sciences, Engineering, Mathematics, Computer Sciences, Molecular and Cell Biology, Economics, Astronomy, Chemistry, Geology, Statistics
Prerequisite: 

Three-and-a-half years of high school mathematics, including trigonometry and analytic geometry, plus a satisfactory grade in one of the following: CEEB MAT test, an AP test, the UC/CSU math diagnostic test or Math 32. It is strongly recommended that you take 1A only if you have already completed precalculus.

Satisfies: 
Quantitative Reasoning requirement if completed with a grade of C− or better. Some majors have specific grade requirements. Students will not receive credit for 1A after taking 16B and 2 units after taking 16A. Math 1A is required to continue on to Math 53 or 54 and are prerequisites for physical science, computer science and math majors. Life science majors also accept this series.
Course Description: 

Math 1A covers the topics of calculus of one variable, mainly with derivatives, and applications such as graphing and optimization. It introduces the idea of integration and applications such as volumes of revolution. Students are expected to understand some theorems and their proofs. This rigorous course emphasizes conceptual understanding and is intended for students in engineering and physical sciences. Three hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per week.

Topics Covered: 
Intuitive and precise limit definitions, continuity, definition of the derivative, shortcut rules for finding derivatives, product rule, quotient rule, chain rule, implicit differentiation, related rates, linear approximations and differentials, mean value theorem, L'Hopital's rule, curve sketching, optimization, Newton's Method, definition of Riemann integral, Fundamental Theorem of Calculus (Parts 1 and 2), natural logarithm defined as an integral, area between two curves, volumes of solids of revolution.
Skills Needed: 
  • Facility with a scientific calculator or graphing calculator may be required
    • Ability to determine the value of a complicated expression using a scientific or graphing calculator
  • Facility with fractions
    • Ability to simplify rational expressions and solve rational equations
  • Facility with algebra
    • Ability to solve linear equations
    • Ability to solve quadratic equations by factoring, completing the square and using the quadratic formula
    • Ability to solve a linear system of equations
  • Facility with graphing
    • Ability to identify and plot points on the Cartesian plane
    • Ability to graph lines
  • Facility with exponential and logarithmic functions
    • Familiarity with e and natural logarithms
    • Ability to simplify expressions containing logarithms
    • Ability to solve logarithmic equations
      • Ability to graph exponential and logarithmic functions
  • Facility with trigonometry
    • Familiarity with radian measure
    • Ability to compute trigonometric functions of simple angles
    • Ability to use the Pythagorean Theorem
    • Ability to solve triangle using the Law of Sines or the Law of Cosines
    • Knowledge of addition formula for sine and cosine
Mathematics XB1B—Calculus (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XMATH
Examples of Intended Majors: 
Physical Sciences, Engineering, Mathematics, Computer Sciences, Molecular and Cell Biology, Economics, Astronomy, Chemistry, Geology, Statistics
Prerequisite: 

Math 1A or equivalent coursework; please check Assist.org or with the Office of Undergraduate Admissions to make sure your coursework is equivalent to UC Berkeley's Math 1A.

Satisfies: 
Quantitative Reasoning requirement if completed with a grade of C− or better. Some majors have specific grade requirements. Students taking 1B after 16B receive only 2 units for 1B. Math 1B is required to continue on to Math 53 or 54 and are prerequisites for physical science, computer science and math majors. Life science majors also accept this series.
Course Description: 

Math 1B is a continuation of Math 1A. It involves integration techniques and applications and introduces infinite series and first- and second-order differential equations and their uses. It is intended for students with majors in engineering, math and some sciences. Three hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per week.

Topics Covered: 
Integration by parts; trigonometric integrals; trigonometric substitution; partial fractions; midpoint, trapezoid and Simpson’s rules; improper integrals; arc length; area of a surface of revolution; sequences and series; integral test; comparison tests; alternating series; ratio test; root test; power series; Taylor series; binomial series; modeling with differential equations; direction fields; Euler’s method; separable equations; exponential growth and decay; logistic equation; linear differential equations; homogeneous and nonhomogeneous second-order linear differential equations and their applications; series solutions for second-order differential equations.
Skills Needed: 
  • Facility with a scientific calculator or graphing calculator may be required
    • Ability to determine the value of a complicated expression using a scientific or graphing calculator
  • Facility with fractions
    • Ability to simplify rational expressions and solve rational equations
  • Facility with algebra
    • Ability to solve linear equations
    • Ability to solve quadratic equations by factoring, completing the square and using the quadratic formula
    • Ability to solve a linear system of equations
  • Facility with graphing
    • Ability to identify and plot points on the Cartesian plane
    • Ability to graph lines
  • Facility with exponential and logarithmic functions
    • Familiarity with e and natural logarithms
    • Ability to simplify expressions containing logarithms
    • Ability to solve logarithmic equations
    • Ability to graph exponential and logarithmic functions
  • Facility with trigonometry
    • Familiarity with radian measure
    • Ability to compute trigonometric functions of simple angles
    • Ability to use the Pythagorean Theorem
    • Ability to solve triangle using the Law of Sines or the Law of Cosines
    • Knowledge of addition formula for sine and cosine
  • Facility with differentiation
    • Knowledge that a derivative can be interpreted as a rate of change or the slope of a tangent line
    • Ability to compute the derivative of elementary functions
    • Ability to use the product, quotient and chain rules
    • Ability to differentiate implicitly
  • Facility with integration
    • Ability to compute volumes of solids of revolution
    • Ability to integrate using u-substitution
Statistics XB2—Introduction to Statistics (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XSTAT
Examples of Intended Majors: 
Psychology, Political Economy, Development Studies, Legal Studies, Nutritional Science: Dietetics, Nutritional Science: Physiology and Metabolism
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Quantitative Reasoning requirement if completed with a grade of C− or better. Some majors have specific grade requirements. Statistics 2 fulfills prerequisites for some social science majors, such as psychology. It does not fulfill prerequisites for the economics major, statistics major or the Haas Undergraduate Business Program.
Course Description: 

This course introduces basic concepts of probability and statistical inference and covers standard methods for making inferences about populations from information contained in sample data: the methods used in sample surveys, opinion polls, research studies and industry. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Topics Covered: 
Populations, statistics, variables, observational studies versus experiments, graphs of data, descriptive measures of location and spread, normal approximation, correlation, the regression line, Simpson’s paradox, probability, binomial and normal distributions, and the behavior of the average of samples, as well as inference methods such as estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis tests for averages and percentages, and the chi-square test.
Skills Needed: 
  • Facility with a scientific calculator or graphing calculator may be required
    • Ability to determine the value of a complicated expression using a scientific or graphing calculator
  • Facility with fractions
    • Ability to simplify rational expressions and solve rational equations
  • Facility with algebra
    • Ability to solve linear equations
    • Ability to solve quadratic equations by factoring, completing the square and using the quadratic formula
    • Ability to solve a linear system of equations
  • Facility with graphing
    • Ability to identify and plot points on the Cartesian plane
    • Ability to graph lines

Reading and Composition (R&C) Requirement

You may have already fulfilled the L&S R&C requirement, though most freshmen have not. You should complete the R&C requirement by the end of your freshman year or, at the latest, by the end of your sophomore year.

Reading and Composition R1A

English XBR1A—Reading and Composition: San Francisco Campus (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XENGLIS
Prerequisite: 

Completion of the UC Entry-level Writing Requirement

Satisfies: 
The first-half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement
Course Description: 

Get further instruction in expository writing and focus on the recursive nature of writing and reading. You develop practical fluency in writing longer expositions and gain experience in including research results into papers. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections 
English R1A-14, R1A-15, R1A-17
Writing California

Instructor: Angevine

Welcome to (the University of) California, the rich, varied, and wonderful place you now call home. We’ll structure our introduction to college reading and writing by exploring a group of texts—among them Maxine Hong Kingston’s The Woman Warrior, John Steinbeck’s In Dubious Battle, Joan Didion’s Play It As It Lays, Roman Polanski’s film Chinatown, and a number of essays, stories, and poems—that reflect on California’s unique promises, paradoxes, and problems. We’ll take advantage of our San Francisco location to explore the concept of California in the visual arts, too, focusing particularly on works in the collection of the newly reopened SFMOMA.

English R1A-19
San Francisco: Reverberations of the 1960's

Instructor: Lempert

In popular histories of San Francisco, so much of the city’s identity – the town’s progressive politics, its embrace of all things strange and funky, even its current status as the epicenter of technological innovation – traces its roots back to the 1960’s. (We could extend this history to Berkeley, too, which still leads the nation in tie-dyes per capita.) To be fair, there is some truth here. The hippies, the Black Panthers, the techo-utopians, the burnouts, Asian American literature, LGBTQ activism, even the still-lingering smells of incense and patchouli: all rightfully come from the 1960’s.  Yet to read San Francisco only through the 1960’s papers over so much more. The Beatniks of the 1950’s – famous for hanging out in North Beach – shared little of the hope of their hippie offspring. The 1970’s saw widespread disillusionment and paranoia. Even the Gold Rush of 1849 built SF up not as a place of love and peace, but as a place to get rich quick. (Sound familiar?) Today, widespread gentrification and the exodus of minority populations has the city wondering if it’s still the place people long dreamed about coming to.  In this class, we’ll examine this complicated legacy, that of the 1960’s on San Francisco. We’ll look at what came before and what after. We’ll ask what SF has meant at different times and to different sorts of demographics, cultures, and identities. We’ll read novels, poems, and essays, listen to a bunch of music, watch at least one film, and go on a field trip or two.  As this is a college writing class, we’ll also spend plenty of time on writing and argumentation, working on various problems of interpretation, style, clarity, flow, interest, cohesion and analysis. It will be great.

College Writing XBR1A—Accelerated Reading and Composition: San Francisco Campus (6 units)
Enroll: 
first-half of R&C and ELWR
Department Abbreviation: 
XCOLWRI
Prerequisite: 

Placement by the UC Analytical Writing Placement Exam. This course is only for students who did not pass the AWPE and have not otherwise satisfied Entry-Level Writing with SAT, ACT, or AP/IB exam scores. 

Satisfies: 
Both the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement and the first-half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

This is an intensive and accelerated composition course. Readings include imaginative, expository and argumentative texts representing the range of those encountered in the undergraduate curriculum. Read from authors with diverse social and cultural backgrounds and perspectives. Instruction covers many types of writing and revising papers. Six hours of class per week.

Section
College Writing R1A-5
Witness and Testimony

Instructor: Spanbock

 

Understanding subjectivity is an essential part of the writing process. When we express ourselves, make an argument, or tell a story, we do so from a position shaped by who we are and where we are, our background and experiences, our thoughts and beliefs, and even how we are feeling in that moment. Subjectivity also plays a foundational role in how we understand and interpret others and the world around us. It shapes our opinions and makes us unique. This class asks students to consider subjectivity through two distinct but related paradigms: witnessing, an act of seeing or otherwise experiencing an event, and testimony, an act of self-expression meant to share or convey opinions on what has been witnessed. The purpose of this class is to introduce practical methods for reading “texts” (print, visual, auditory, social, etc.) and to activate both thought and writing processes to engage with the dynamic issues they raise. Together, we will examine a number of short and long texts that draw from and speak to discourses from across the academic disciplines and raise questions concerning subjectivity in acts of witness and testimony.  We will also explore different techniques for self-expression and different types of writing with a goal of better understanding our own subject positions, as well as those we encounter. Operating under the premise that our community stands to benefit from a diversity of perspectives and opinions, this class will have a specific emphasis on LOCAL instances of witness and testimony in and around the Bay Area.

Rhetoric XBR1A—The Craft of Writing: San Francisco Campus (4 units)
Enroll: 
first-half of R&C
Department Abbreviation: 
XRHETOR
Prerequisite: 

Completion of the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement or UC Analytical Writing Placement Exam

Satisfies: 
The first-half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

Learn the principles of argumentative writing and emphasizes close readings of texts that reveal their rhetorical structure and intended audience. You learn to identify and interpret a text's thesis and intention and make compelling arguments for your position using textual evidence. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections 
Rhetoric R1A-5
San Francisco: Reverberations of the 1960's

Instructor: Lempert

 

In popular histories of San Francisco, so much of the city’s identity – the town’s progressive politics, its embrace of all things strange and funky, even its current status as the epicenter of technological innovation – traces its roots back to the 1960’s. (We could extend this history to Berkeley, too, which still leads the nation in tie-dyes per capita.) To be fair, there is some truth here. The hippies, the Black Panthers, the techo-utopians, the burnouts, Asian American literature, LGBTQ activism, even the still-lingering smells of incense and patchouli: all rightfully come from the 1960’s.  Yet to read San Francisco only through the 1960’s papers over so much more. The Beatniks of the 1950’s – famous for hanging out in North Beach – shared little of the hope of their hippie offspring. The 1970’s saw widespread disillusionment and paranoia. Even the Gold Rush of 1849 built SF up not as a place of love and peace, but as a place to get rich quick. (Sound familiar?) Today, widespread gentrification and the exodus of minority populations has the city wondering if it’s still the place people long dreamed about coming to.  In this class, we’ll examine this complicated legacy, that of the 1960’s on San Francisco. We’ll look at what came before and what after. We’ll ask what SF has meant at different times and to different sorts of demographics, cultures, and identities. We’ll read novels, poems, and essays, listen to a bunch of music, watch at least one film, and go on a field trip or two.  As this is a college writing class, we’ll also spend plenty of time on writing and argumentation, working on various problems of interpretation, style, clarity, flow, interest, cohesion and analysis. It will be great.

Rhetoric R1A-6, R1A-7
Archaeological Readers: Rhetorically Excavating Issues through Close Reading, Critical Thinking, Argumentative Writing

Instructor: Borst-Rothe

 

Most incoming students are not prepared for the expected level of critical thinking writing, and speaking--skills important at the university and in professional settings. This course will focus on the Rhetorical Framework: identifying critical issues in different disciplines, analyzing style and structure in different arguments, and learning to argue logically and persuasively about authorial intention using textual evidence. Two units focus on the importance of California: one related to the rhetoric of place as a California dream, the other illustrating California's importance in the arts for visual artists, writers, film makers, and photographers. Just as important are units focusing on critical contemporary issues ranging from issues in healthcare to mass incarceration. You'll also have a change to explore the museums (SFMOMA or Berkeley's BAMPFA) as an experiential option in the Art Unit. All writing assignments will focus on modern-day application of classical rhetorical structure, applicable to any field of study, just as brief presentations will help you practice professional speaking. And class discussion, small group work, as well as seminar-style participation will open up the value, the excitement of translating your ideas into clear persuasive arguments, not mere opinions, that you as the next generation of leaders will need. I look forward to taking this archaeological journey with you!

Reading and Composition R1B

English XBR1B—Reading and Composition: San Francisco Campus (4 units)
Enroll: 
second-half of R&C
Department Abbreviation: 
XENGLIS
Prerequisite: 

Completion of both the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement and the first-half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement

Satisfies: 
The second-half (R1B portion) of the reading and composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

Get further instruction in argumentative writing and focus on intensive argumentative writing drawn from controversy stimulated through selected readings and class discussion. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections 
English R1B-15
Asian in America 

Instructor: Premnath

 

Asians have been part of US society since the early days of the republic. Yet Asians continue to occupy an anomalous, sometimes problematic location in American life. In this course we will study how Asian American writers, thinkers, and artists respond to the challenges and explore the possibilities of their vexed cultural situation. Our readings will foreground the rich Asian American history of the San Francisco Bay Area, and the Japanese internees, Filipino manongs, Indian revolutionaries, and nerds of all nations who made it. We’ll also take advantage of our location to visit crucial historic sites like Chinatown, the International Hotel Manilatown Center, and the Gadar Memorial Hall. Students will develop their own stake in the material through a series of guided writing projects involving significant independent research.


English R1B-16
The Right to the City

Instructor: Premnath

 

The city looms large in the modern imagination: a stage for grand historical spectacles and everyday drama; a zone of contact and exclusion; a space of pleasure and danger, hope and threat. Who gets to define and participate in urban life? Whose interests, needs, and desires get heard in conversations about the future of the city? We’ll explore such questions through a wide-ranging set of texts engaging with urban situations across the planet. We’ll also take advantage of our San Francisco location, exploring the city together and assessing the urgent ongoing debates surrounding gentrification, policing, and tech-driven urban transformation. Students will be encouraged to take informed positions in such debates through a series of guided writing projects involving significant independent research.


English R1B-13, English R1B-14
Getting Perspetive 

Instructor: Miller

 

Welcome to UC Berkeley, the setting you’ve chosen for the next chapter of your life.  You worked hard to get here. Now what? The answer to that question takes us to the heart of English 1B, a class that will help you will develop the critical thinking and writing skills college requires. How? With guidance from writers on our syllabus, many of whom have chosen UC Berkeley or the San Francisco Bay Area as their literary backdrop, what the author of The Triggering Townhas called the “stage setting” or “base of operations” of a text. These poems, memoirs, essays, short stories, and novels will inspire you to read thoughtfully, think deeply, question assumptions, identify beliefs, and confront biases. The voices, narrators, and characters you encounter this semester are struggling to get some perspective -- literally, intellectually, psychologically, and morally. As they reflect upon new identities, shifting family allegiances, different environments, devastating losses, and complicated moral dilemmas, you also might find yourself feeling disoriented, getting lost, pushed to test, adjust, or discard familiar ideas while new perspectives, views, and theories come into focus.

Rhetoric XBR1B—The Craft of Writing: San Francisco Campus (4 units)
Enroll: 
second-half of R&C
Department Abbreviation: 
: XRHETOR
Prerequisite: 

Completion of both the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement and the first-half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement

Satisfies: 
The second-half (R1B portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

Get further instruction in argumentative writing and focus on intensive argumentative writing drawn from controversy stimulated through selected readings and class discussion. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections 
Rhetoric R1B-3
San Francisco: Reverberations of the 1960's

Instructor: Lempert

 

In popular histories of San Francisco, so much of the city’s identity – the town’s progressive politics, its embrace of all things strange and funky, even its current status as the epicenter of technological innovation – traces its roots back to the 1960’s. (We could extend this history to Berkeley, too, which still leads the nation in tie-dyes per capita.) To be fair, there is some truth here. The hippies, the Black Panthers, the techo-utopians, the burnouts, Asian American literature, LGBTQ activism, even the still-lingering smells of incense and patchouli: all rightfully come from the 1960’s.  Yet to read San Francisco only through the 1960’s papers over so much more. The Beatniks of the 1950’s – famous for hanging out in North Beach – shared little of the hope of their hippie offspring. The 1970’s saw widespread disillusionment and paranoia. Even the Gold Rush of 1849 built SF up not as a place of love and peace, but as a place to get rich quick. (Sound familiar?) Today, widespread gentrification and the exodus of minority populations has the city wondering if it’s still the place people long dreamed about coming to.  In this class, we’ll examine this complicated legacy, that of the 1960’s on San Francisco. We’ll look at what came before and what after. We’ll ask what SF has meant at different times and to different sorts of demographics, cultures, and identities. We’ll read novels, poems, and essays, listen to a bunch of music, watch at least one film, and go on a field trip or two.  As this is a college writing class, we’ll also spend plenty of time on writing and argumentation, working on various problems of interpretation, style, clarity, flow, interest, cohesion and analysis. It will be great.

Legal Studies XBR1B—Reading and Composition in Connection With the Law as a Social Institution (4 units)
Enroll: 
second-half of R&C
Department Abbreviation: 
XLEGALS
Prerequisite: 

Completion of both the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement and the first-half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement.

Satisfies: 
The second-half (R1B portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

Develop your skills in critical reading, writing and analysis, and complete a series of essays culminating in a research paper relating to law, legal actors and legal institutions. Emphasis is placed on the process of writing, including developing research questions, constructing an argument and revising for content and style. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections
Legal Studies R1B-2
Democracy, Disobedience, and Resistance

Instructor: TBA

 

This reading and composition seminar takes its inspiration from the rich histories of protest and free speech in the San Francisco Bay Area. Over the course of the semester, we will consider such questions as: Do we – as citizens and residents of the United States – have an obligation to obey the laws enacted by our government? If democracy is understood to be government “by and for the people,” what do we owe to the state and our peers? Are we morally obligated to obey laws that we consider to be unjust? And, if the laws are indeed deemed unjust, what kinds of social protest, disobedience, and resistance are justified? To answer these questions, this course will engage with a range of classic and contemporary texts from philosophers, legal actors, and practitioners of disobedience on such themes as obligation, justice, non-violent versus violent action, coercion, responsibility, authority, and liberty. After considering foundational philosophical texts from thinkers like Plato, John Locke, and John Stuart Mill, we will devote significant time to analyzing tangible moments of democratically-oriented disobedience and resistance, including: the American Revolution (which will feature the popular musical Hamilton, the Federalist and Anti-Federalist Papers, and the 19th writings of Henry David Thoreau); the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s (which will draw from the speeches and writings of Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, and Berkeley’s own Mario Savio); the Feminist Movement (which will incorporate writings from historical figures like Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony as well as contemporary political and legal theorists like Catharine MacKinnon and Judith Butler); and the present (which will examine the Supreme Court’s decision in Citizens United, the Black Lives Matter movement, and popular responses to Donald Trump’s Executive Order to ban travel from Muslim-majority nations). Each of these moments will serve as “test cases” for thinking about expanding, altering, or otherwise rehabilitating the political and legal conditions of participatory and representative democracy. Where and when appropriate, students can expect to observe or analyze the coverage of protests occurring in San Francisco, Oakland, and Berkeley. This seminar is part of the On the Same Page program, recognizing the diverse and unique voices that contribute to the shaping of democratic life. For more, see: http://onthesamepage.berkeley.edu.

Anthropology XB1—Introduction to Biological Anthropology (4 units)
Department: 
Biological Science
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XANTHRO
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Either the Biological Science or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

This course will provide the student with an introduction to the discipline of anthropological archaeology with a special emphasis on how archaeology contributes to our understanding of American society and the cultures from which it is drawn. Students will learn about the methods, goals, and theoretical concepts of archaeology with attention to the impact archaeology has had on the construction of the histories of diverse communities−Native Americans, African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos, and European Americans. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Anthropology XB2AC—Introduction to Archaeology (4 Units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XANTHRO
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the HIstorical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade.
Course Description: 

Gain an introduction to the discipline of anthropological archaeology with a special emphasis on how archaeology contributes to our understanding of American society and the cultures from which it is drawn. You will learn about the methods, goals and theoretical concepts of archaeology, with attention to the impact archaeology has had on the construction of the histories of diverse communities, such as Native Americans, African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos and European Americans. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Art XB98—Symbolic and Practical: Art and Social Justice (2 Units)
Department: 
Electives
Department Abbreviation: 
XART
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Electives do not fulfill University or breadth requirements, but are great opportunities to enrich your schedule in areas you find interesting.
Course Description: 

Artists have long made works that address issues of justice, equity, freedom and oppression. These works, and the strategies artists employ, are frequently informed by, produced through or in dialogue with social movements that seek to alter the conditions of society. The relationship between art and social movements raises questions about what it means to do art and what it means to do social justice. In order to explore the overlaps, tensions, and distinctions between the symbolic and practical practices of artists and social movements, this course combines student experimentation, readings, videos, discussion and site visits throughout the San Francisco Bay Area.

Asian American Studies XB20A—Introduction to the History of Asians in the United States (4 units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XASAMST
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Either the Historical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Examine critical aspects of Asian-American histories and experiences from 1848 to the present. Gain a historical framework for a basic understanding of the experiences of the major Asian-American groups and an analytical foundation for comparative analyses. You will understand national and international factors that have an impact on migration and related policies; intersecting issues of race, class and gender relations; interclass conflicts between labor and capital; and intraclass conflicts as evidenced by labor agitation against Asian migration and resettlement. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Astronomy XB10—Introduction to General Astronomy (4 units)
Department: 
Physical Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XASTRON
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Physical Science breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Cover modern astronomy with an emphasis on the structure and evolution of stars, galaxies and the universe. Additional topics optionally discussed include quasars, pulsars, black holes and extraterrestrial communications. A minimum of high school–level algebra and geometry is assumed, but equation solving and memorization are not emphasized. Most students are not physical science majors, and the emphasis is on understanding the skills used in astrophysics that are of interest to society. Students receive no credit for Astronomy 10 after taking Astronomy 7A or 7B. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Classics XB10A—Introduction to Greek Civilization (4 units)
Department: 
Arts and Literature
Historical Studies
Philosophy and Values
Department Abbreviation: 
XCLASSI
Prerequisite: 

None; however, this is a writing- and reading-intensive course, and your writing skills should exceed the College Writing course level

Satisfies: 
Either the Arts and Literature, Historical Studies, or Philosophy and Values breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Get an introductory survey of Greek civilization from the Bronze Age to 4th-century B.C.E. ancient Greece. One of several civilizations of the ancient Mediterranean, Greek civilization has had an enduring influence on many areas of Western thought and culture, and its surviving literature includes several works that continue to stand among the world's most significant. The study of this culture, in both its similarities and differences with our own, helps us understand contemporary individual and societal conflict. You read and discuss works of several different types of literature, including epic poetry, lyric poetry, tragedy, comedy, history and philosophy. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

College Writing XBR1A—Accelerated Reading and Composition: Berkeley Campus (6 units)
Enroll: 
first-half of R&C and ELWR
Department Abbreviation: 
XCOLWRI
Prerequisite: 

Only for students who have not passed the UC Analytical Writing Placement Exam or have not satisfied the Entry-Level Writing requirement. 

Satisfies: 
Both the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement and the first-half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

This is an intensive and accelerated composition course. Readings include imaginative, expository and argumentative texts representing the range of those encountered in the undergraduate curriculum. Read from authors with diverse social and cultural backgrounds and perspectives. Instruction covers many types of writing and revising papers. Six hours of class per week.

Sections 
College Writing R1A-1
Topic: TBA

Instructor: TBA

 

College Writing R1A-2, R1A-4
The Iceberg of Culture

Instructor: TBA

With the rise of neo-nationalism, as seen in Brexit and in America’s 2016 election, cross-cultural understanding is more important than ever. Plus, it’s fascinating! We’ll explore Geert Hofstede’s Model of Cultures (developed from IBM employee surveys) and recent responses to it by Brendan McSweeney and others. We’ll look at the Culture Compass smart phone app and ask what Hofstede’s Cultural Dimensions Theory can teach us about cultures that differ from our own. We’ll read amazing fiction that can help us “overcome identity politics,” as novelist Elif Shafak observes, and we’ll watch TED talks and riveting documentaries that can help us see where our own cultural biases lie. In short, we’ll expand our worlds as we write excellent papers, too.

College Writing R1A-3
Witness and Testimony

Instructor: Spanbock

 

Understanding subjectivity is an essential part of the writing process. When we express ourselves, make an argument, or tell a story, we do so from a position shaped by who we are and where we are, our background and experiences, our thoughts and beliefs, and even how we are feeling in that moment. Subjectivity also plays a foundational role in how we understand and interpret others and the world around us. It shapes our opinions and makes us unique. This class asks students to consider subjectivity through two distinct but related paradigms: witnessing, an act of seeing or otherwise experiencing an event, and testimony, an act of self-expression meant to share or convey opinions on what has been witnessed. The purpose of this class is to introduce practical methods for reading “texts” (print, visual, auditory, social, etc.) and to activate both thought and writing processes to engage with the dynamic issues they raise. Together, we will examine a number of short and long texts that draw from and speak to discourses from across the academic disciplines and raise questions concerning subjectivity in acts of witness and testimony.  We will also explore different techniques for self-expression and different types of writing with a goal of better understanding our own subject positions, as well as those we encounter. Operating under the premise that our community stands to benefit from a diversity of perspectives and opinions, this class will have a specific emphasis on LOCAL instances of witness and testimony in and around the Bay Area.

 

 

 

Comparative Literature XBR1A—English Composition in Connection With the Reading of World Literature (4 units)
Enroll: 
first-half of R&C
Department Abbreviation: 
TBD
Prerequisite: 

Completion of the UC Entry Level Writing Requirement or UC Analytical Writing Placement Exam

Satisfies: 
The first-half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better.
Course Description: 

Gain instruction in expository writing based on analysis of selected masterpieces of ancient and modern literature. You will come to understand the readings through class discussion and writing and revising papers that analyze the readings in academic argument form. Learn to read and write at the analytical and critical levels required at the University of California. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections
Comparative Literature R1A-1
Lost & Found in the American City 

Instructor: Palau

 

A Mexico City writer who wonders whether individuality dissolves in his overcrowded, “post-apocalyptic city.” A poet who imagines the possibilities of a booming metropolis while riding a ferry between Manhattan and Brooklyn. A nineteenth-century intellectual for whom the rise of urban centers in Argentina represents hope for civility, order, and national prosperity. Photojournalists who wander Mexico’s capital with their cameras, capturing both the minute details and big stories of everyday city life. No matter how different, all these people produce and practice the city in some way: they write, they wander, they take photographs and ponder what their cities are and might become, all the while navigating urban space and exploring the complexities of finding and losing histories, objects, and selves within it. But who—and what—gets lost and found in the American city? As cultural, political, and economic centers, can cities foster connection, creativity, and belonging? What gets lost—or pushed into possible oblivion—in and by the city? With these questions in mind, we’ll spend the semester exploring the imagined landscapes of four of America’s most iconic cities—New York, Mexico City, Buenos Aires, and Los Angeles. Along the way, we’ll consider some of the ways in which urban spaces are experienced, constructed, explored, and imagined as spaces where some get lost, others found.

Earth and Planetary Science (Geology) XB80—Environmental Earth Sciences (3 units)
Department: 
Physical Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XEPS
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Physical Science breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Survey human interactions with the planet Earth. You examine topics ranging from geologic hazards, such as earthquakes and volcanoes, to human effects on the environment, such as pollution and climate change. You also study geologic aspects of the use of land and oceans. Three hours of lecture per week.

Earth and Planetary Science (Geology) XBC20—Earthquakes in Your Backyard (3 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XEPS
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Physical Science breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

 Introduction to earthquakes, their causes and effects. General discussion of basic principles and methods of seismology and geological tectonics, distribution of earthquakes in space and time, effects of earthquakes, and earthquake hazard and risk, with particular emphasis on the situation in California.

English XB31AC—Literature of American Cultures (4 Units)
Department: 
Arts and Literature
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XENGLIS
Prerequisite: 

None; however, this is a writing- and reading-intensive course, and your writing skills should exceed the College Writing course level.

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and the Arts and Literature breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Get an introduction to short stories, poems, memoirs and essays by contemporary African-American, Latin American, Asian-American, Native American and Middle Eastern American authors. Reading transports us to new worlds where we can encounter different, sometimes unsettling voices. Discussing and then writing about these diverse texts will not only deepen your appreciation for your own familial and cultural legacies, but will also help you become more open to those of others. This course is open to all students, but especially recommended for prospective English majors and for students who have satisfied the R&C requirement and wish to develop college-level reading, analytic and writing skills. Three hours of lecture per week.

English XBR1A—Reading and Composition: Berkeley Campus (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XENGLIS
Prerequisite: 

Completion of the UC Entry-level Writing Requirement

Satisfies: 
The first-half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement
Course Description: 

Get further instruction in expository writing and focus on the recursive nature of writing and reading. You develop practical fluency in writing longer expositions and gain experience in including research results into papers. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections 
English R1A-1 (Section Cancelled)
 
English R1A-2
21st Century America as Seen through its Celebrated Writers

Instructor: Gilbert, R.

How do we structure our stories and essays these days, what are they about, how do we use language? What do we watch in our theaters? Who do we educated Americans think we are?


English R1A-4
Ambition

Instructor: Miller

Who are you, and what are your dreams and ambitions? Do your aspirations line up with your passions and talents? What gets in the way of achieving goals you set? Do you face hidden obstacles? This course will help us address these and other questions by concentrating on a set of skills crucial to college success: thinking for yourself, making yourself clear when you write, and speaking up in the public spaces of the classroom. To help you get to know yourself and your ambitions better, we will read, discuss, and write about essays, poems, short stories and a novel that address ambition in a number of ways. Encountering these narratives will inspire you to identify your aspirations for college and for life, and to understand what might be getting in the way of reaching them. In the process, you will learn how you can set yourself up for success as college writers.

 

English R1A-6
Solitude, Attention and the Struggle to Be

Instructor: O'Brien

Why is Hamlet's famous question among the most universally familiar and quoted lines of literature? One of Shakespeare's most performed plays, Hamlet remains an enigma to most viewers, as the main character's motives, words, and acts puzzle the mind--at least the surface mind--and leave us in doubt as to why an apparently angry, grief stricken, and often confused protagonist remains a box office draw over centuries. In this section of English 1B we will practice basic skills in reading a few classic texts that explore major issues (such as that Hamlet confronts), begin to learn how to broaden and deepen our reading with the aid of other key texts, and explore the application of this research to concerns that occupy us all as individuals and as members of local and global communities, including those of the past, present, and future.

English R1A-11, R1A-12
Identity as Performance

Instructor: Ghosh

“All the world’s a stage, And all the men and women merely players.”  --As You Like It, Act II Sc. VII  We often hear people say that actions speak louder than words. We express our identities, who we are, through our actions, our performances, our lived experiences amidst the context and structures within which we operate. We connect with our immediate socio-political circumstances, and these relations, in turn, determine our performances of our identities. Personal identity is thus not a concrete unchangeable idea, but its performance is constantly in flux depending on the context. This will be a reading- and writing-intensive course where we will examine short stories, poems, novels, plays, and films focusing on the construction of identity through performance.  This course fulfills the first half of the UC Reading & Composition requirement; together with our critical inquiry into modes of reading, we will practice our writing skills. We will devote plenty of time to critical thinking and essay-writing skills, paying particular attention to argumentation, analysis, and the fundamentals of writing at the college level.


English R1A-20, R1A-21
Gender and Identity

Instructor: Correa

In this course, we will investigate the impact that gender has on identity. What does it mean to be a man? What does it mean to be a woman? How have gender constraints changed over the years? Using a variety of primary sources—short stories, essays, poems, novels and a play we will consider the shifting boundaries of gender roles over time and across cultures.


English R1A-22
"Forget it Jake, it's Chinatown": Chinatown and the Culture of Exclusion

Instructor: Lee

Taking Chinatown as a case study, this course will explore the ideological investments that underscore literary and filmic representations of racialized urban spaces. On the one hand, we will consider the formal strategies used to construct the geography of Chinatown and on the other, how Chinatown is deployed as a key site for popular imaginations about urban crime, poverty, race, and sexuality.  We will examine the ways in which literary and cultural representations constitute and negotiate race, class, and sexual boundaries in the American city, and their broader implications for questions of national identity and citizenship.  How does Chinatown narrate the story of American exclusion?  In addition to thinking about Chinatown as an ethnic enclave, we will also consider Chinatown as a global space taking into account its reconfigurations under the impact of cultural and capitalist globalization.  We will consider Chinatown as an urban aesthetic, in part by paying attention to figures such as the FOB, gangster, and hipster and the ways in which they have variously laid claim on Chinatown.  Finally, Chinatown is a political space; by studying the protests and social movements that sprang out of Chinatown, we will look at how Chinatown has changed not only America’s social and cultural landscapes but also American politics. This course will develop your critical thinking, close-reading, and composition skills through in-class discussions and exercises. Students will begin by writing short essays in response to the readings, which we will develop into progressively longer essays throughout the semester. Through a series of in-class workshops, we will discuss student drafts and suggestions for revisions.

English R1A-23
Explorers, Monsters, and Magicians

Instructor: TBA

In this course, we will read and write about characters who go on physical journeys that parallel their mental search to affirm who they are and where they belong. We'll explore how classic and contemporary works illuminate diverse answers to the following questions: What powers, burdens, or risks go with defining oneself (or being defined as) an explorer, a hero, a scholar-magician, an outsider, or even a monster? How responsible are we for the dreams and inventions we create? What does it mean to leave or find a home? How far should one person go to fight for his or her reputation, name, or honor? What are the connections between art and life? Between language and power?

 
English XBR1B—Reading and Composition: Berkeley Campus (4 units)
Enroll: 
second-half of R&C
Department Abbreviation: 
XENGLIS
Prerequisite: 

Completion of both the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement and the first-half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement

Satisfies: 
The second-half (R1B portion) of the reading and composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

Get further instruction in argumentative writing and focus on intensive argumentative writing drawn from controversy stimulated through selected readings and class discussion. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections 
English R1B-1, English R1B-2
Life-on-the Hyphen

Instructor: Nanda

 

Some were brought here, while some came here to the Americas. A fascinating short quote from Walt Whitman begins our course—“I turn but do not extricate myself,/ Confused, a past-reading, another,/ but with darkness yet”— for in a way we are all aliens in this land of aliens asking ourselves who are we, what are we trying to achieve and how may we achieve it? This course is about life in the Americas. It’s about life that beckons, it’s about a life that promises, it’s about a life that often fails—it’s about your life-on-the-hyphen. We read a variety of texts by Toni Morrison,  Kiran Desai and Chang-rae Lee to better understand the complexities and nuances of navigating our own lives on the hyphen.  Basic rhetorical tools such as description, analysis, explanation, narration, speculation and argument will be used to share your experiences, information and views with others. The emphasis will be on provocative theses, strategies of argument and competent analysis of evidence. It will also introduce you to research techniques that would involve evaluation and synthesis of primary and secondary source material into your argument.


English R1B-3, R1B-5
Dystopian Fictions

Instructor: Hollis

 

Dystopian and post-apocalyptic fiction depicts worlds that reflect the worst elements of our own. Often used as a mirror held up to contemporary culture, dystopian fictions may comment on science, technology, and environmental issues developing in our own world. They may also reflect concerns we have with inequality, identity, and political power. Classic dystopian texts include George Orwell’s 1984 and Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World; popular contemporary dystopian texts include books and films like The Hunger Games and Divergent. Although this course will not assign any of those last texts mentioned, we may very well refer to them. The readings for this course will include both obvious and perhaps not-so-obvious works of dystopia.

English R1B-4 
A Journey Through the Epoch

Instructor: Tipton

 

What ties the course together is not a single theme (though different themes--including freedom and engagement; creation and responsibility; the nature of the ideal marriage; the journey and self-discovery--form linking threads throughout the course), but rather the idea of a chronological trip through time. Through literature, we will travel from the Classical to the Medieval Period, up to the Renaissance and then the Romantic Period, to the Modern, and then finally the Postmodern Period.


English R1B-6
Home and Belonging in a Troubled World

Instructor: Fuchs

 

The theme for this class will be the longing for home and belonging in a troubled world. Characters in many of the works on our list (including two films as well as fiction and non-fiction pieces)  have suffered displacement; they range from aboriginal children in Australia abducted from their families by white authorities to migrants fleeing war or poverty, buoyed by hope and resilience. We will explore the tensions that many newcomers (and their children) experience between assimilation to a foreign culture and fidelity to their own traditions. We will look at representations of a variety of spaces that house people, in some cases by force (including prisons and internment camps), analyzing the conditions which are essential for protagonists to feel whole and "at home" within themselves and their world.


English R1B-7, English R1B-8
Tales and Their Tellers: Storytelling in Fiction and Nonfiction

Instructor: Colopy

 

Humans love stories.  We seem to need them almost as much as we need food, especially when we’re growing up. There are many ways of telling a story; the readings selected for this class represent some of them, ranging from journalism and realism to fantasy.  Looking mostly at contemporary works of fiction we will try to understand—through discussion and writing assignments—what we gain from stories, how we as readers establish a relationship with their narrators, and how that contributes to our understanding of the ideas and realities the authors aim to explore. We will also consider why it is we even like stories that may make us uncomfortable.

Environmental Science Policy and Management XB50AC - Introduction to Culture and Natural Resource Management (4 units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Philosophy and Values
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XESPM
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies, Philosophy and Values, or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Learn how culture affects the way we use and manage fire, wildlands and urban forests, rangelands, parks and preserves, and croplands in America. The basic concepts and tools for evaluating the role of culture in resource use and management are introduced and used to examine the experience of American cultural groups in the development and management of Western natural resources. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Ethnic Studies XB21AC—A Comparative Survey of Racial and Ethnic Groups in the United States (4 units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XETHSTD
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Examine the historical experiences of European immigrants, African Americans and Latinos, emphasizing the themes of migration and economic change since the late-19th century. You will also learn about the experiences of Asian Americans, Native Americans and recently arrived immigrants in the context of the course themes. Throughout the course, discuss intragroup differences such as gender, socioeconomic stratification and cultural variation. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Film XBR1A—The Craft of Writing—Film Focus (4 units)
Enroll: 
first-half of R&C
Department Abbreviation: 
XFILM
Prerequisite: 

Completion of the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement

Satisfies: 
The first-half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition Requirement
Course Description: 

Gain a rhetorical approach to reading and writing argumentative discourse with a film focus. Close reading of selected texts; written themes developed from class discussion and analysis of rhetorical strategies. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections 
Film R1A-1
Screening Nature: Figuring "the Natural" in American Cinema 

Instructor: Carpenter

 

These days, one sees “green” messages everywhere one looks: in advertisements for “natural” food products and fuel-efficient automobiles, businesses’ and broadcast networks’ endorsements of earth-friendly practices, and apocalyptic visions on both big and small screens. In radio, television, and film, on the internet, in print culture and in social networks, environmentalist rhetoric exhorts us to behave a certain way toward the world we inhabit. Because we might think that these images and actions are generally a good thing, we might not think twice about them. And yet, each of these messages makes an argument that relies on assumptions about what nature is, what it means to be human, and how humans, natures, and technologies should interact. Whether we realize it or not, these assumptions structure our ways of thinking and set the course of our actions. This course examines how visual culture does such a thing by pointedly interrogating the way that "nature" figures in the American cinema. By studying the history of the concept of nature in America, and how it has shown up in films across genres -- even where we don't expect it -- we will work toward a new definition of what nature means for us. Moreover, as we discover how nature works as an idea and an image in the texts that surround us, you will emerge able to identify how nature reflects a variety of historically specific notions of race, gender, and nation.

Film R1A-2
"You know you're dealing with the Yakuza, right?": The Gangster across World Cinema

Instructor: TBA

 

The gangster on the big screen is "what we want to be and what we are afraid we might become." So argues critic Robert Warshow in his 1954 essay on “The Gangster as Tragic Hero,” and so starts our investigation into these appealing monsters that capitalism has given us. This course is invested in exploring the historical roots of these violent and doomed heroes whose rise and falls so entrance us. We’ll track the birth of a figure driven by destructive wants, the id of depression era America. Then, like the rapidity of a Tommy gun's blast, our study will quickly expand our course's lens across time and national cinemas, from the gangs of London and the French banlieue to the Chinese Triads and Japanese Yakuza to the new waves of mobsters of the 21st Century. Our cinematic immersion will be driven by a set of questions: what thematic and formal elements remain constant in portrayals of the gangster? In what ways do filmmakers employ the archetypical figure to craft nuanced socio-political critiques of institutional corruption in their respective cultures? What does the gangster, inexorably tied to the city, expose about the viewer's own corrosive appetites and to paraphrase Warshow, what are we afraid of becoming if we were to give in to them? For no matter what else the gangster film may entail, it is always about the alluring but destructive energy of a capitalism that constantly promises us the world even as it threatens to destroy it.

 

Gender and Women’s Studies XB10—Introduction to Gender and Women’s Studies (4 units)
Department: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XGWS
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Get an introduction to questions and concepts in gender and women's studies. Critically study the formation of gender and its intersections with other relations of power, such as sexuality, racialization, class, religion and age. Questions are addressed within the context of a transnational world. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Geography XB30—The Ocean World (4 units)
Department: 
Biological Science
Physical Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XGEOG
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Either the Biological Science or the Physical Science category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Gain an introduction to the cultural and physical geography of the world's oceans. Topics include ecology of ocean biota and environments; history and geography of ocean peoples, cultures and resource use; problems confronting ocean peoples and environments; and new approaches to saving the oceans. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

History of Art XB11—Introduction to Western Art: Renaissance to the Present (4 units)
Department: 
Arts and Literature
Historical Studies
Department Abbreviation: 
XHISTAR
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Either the Arts and Literature or Historical Studies breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

An introduction to the historical circumstances and visual character of Western art from the Renaissance to the present, this course is not a chronological survey but an exploration of topics and themes central to this period. For example: What tasks did painting and sculpture perform in the past? For whom and at whose expense? How do the rise of landscape painting, the cult of the artist and the new emphasis on the nude relate to the emergence of modern society? Do stylistic labels like classicism, realism, impressionism and modernism help answer such questions? This course is recommended for potential art majors and for students in other disciplines, both humanities and sciences. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

History of Art XBR1B—Reading and Writing About Visual Experience (4 units)
Enroll: 
second-half of R&C
Department Abbreviation: 
History of Art XBR1B—Reading and Writing About Visual Experience (4 units)
Prerequisite: 

Completion of both the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement and the first-half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement

Satisfies: 
The second-half (R1B portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

How do mechanisms of perception structure responses to visual art? What is at stake when words describe images? By means of intensive looking, thinking, speaking and writing, this course introduces you to a series of problems and issues in the description and analysis of works of art. Because this course is also an introduction to the historical study of art, it is intended for students with no previous course work in the field. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections 
History of Art R1B-1
From Parchment to Paper: Manuscripts, Prints and Drawings in Early Modern Europe

Instructor: Regan

 

This course examines some of the most important works of art in Renaissance Europe: images in books and on paper. We will look at illuminated manuscripts – that is, painted books – as well as prints, early printed books and drawings, to think about how people in the Renaissance used images in their daily lives. From such pictures, people learned and formed beliefs about everything from miraculous events to social values to the discovery of the New World. In addition to talking about how art of the time explored themes like ethnicity, religion and gender, we'll look at drawings by some of the greatest Renaissance masters – including Leonardo, Michelangelo and Raphael. Visits to the Berkeley Art Museum and the Bancroft Library will let us write about works of art we see in person, and a final research paper lets students choose topics to explore in depth.

History XB7B (AC)—The United States From Civil War to Present (4 units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XHISTOR
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade.
Course Description: 

Examine the experiences and conflicts that comprise American society's history. You will be exposed to a wide range of historical actors and dialogues in order to understand the past, from the perspective of the men and women who experienced it and to gain some insight into the daily lives of Americans: work and leisure, cultures and ideologies, relations with one another, and the political and economic system under which they lived. Lectures and readings focus on the complex interplay among political, economic and cultural interests, and will examine, in particular depth, race relations, the laboring classes, reform movements, the interior of American lives, the changing conditions for success and survival in the culture Americans were shaping, and the emerging role of the United States as a world power. Three hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per week.

Integrative Biology XB31—The Ecology and Evolution of Animal Behavior (3 units)
Department: 
Biological Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XINTEGB
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Biological Science breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Learn about the principles of evolution biology as they relate to animal behavior and behavioral ecology with a broad coverage of animal groups. This course is designed for those not specializing in biology. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Integrative Biology XB33—The Age of Dinosaurs (3 units)
Department: 
Biological Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XINTEGB
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Biological Science breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

In this lecture course, focus on dinosaurs from their appearance to extinction. Learn about the dinosaur skeleton, reconstructing dinosaurs, basic principles of evolution, classification and adaptation, and a survey of dinosaur types. You consider dinosaur reproduction, the question of dinosaur endothermy and the origin of birds. You also survey the other animals that coexisted with the dinosaurs to build a picture of the Mesozoic world. Lectures are often illustrated with slides. Three hours of lecture per week.

Legal Studies XBR1B—Reading and Composition in Connection With the Law as a Social Institution (4 units)
Enroll: 
second-half of R&C
Department Abbreviation: 
XLEGALS
Prerequisite: 

Completion of both the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement and the first-half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement.

Satisfies: 
The second-half (R1B portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

Develop your skills in critical reading, writing and analysis, and complete a series of essays culminating in a research paper relating to law, legal actors and legal institutions. Emphasis is placed on the process of writing, including developing research questions, constructing an argument and revising for content and style. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections (Themes and titles below from Fall 2016)
Legal Studies R1B-1
Law, Religion, and Culture

Instructor: TBA

 

Course Description: In this reading and composition seminar, we will examine historical and contemporary examples of the law’s regulation of religion in order to think critically about the values of freedom, liberty, and equality in democratic societies. We will bring a range of classic texts on religion (such as John Locke’s A Letter Concerning Toleration and Karl Marx’s On the Jewish Question) to bear on watershed legal cases (on such issues as polygamy, religious dress in the workplace, the consumption of spiritual hallucinogens, and faith-based objections to reproductive healthcare). In doing so, we will also examine how the democratic tensions in these texts are made manifest in modern culture by interpreting street art, ethnographic accounts of spiritually-driven lives, and popular media. Some of the questions we will explore include: What “counts” as religion in the eyes of the law? How has the relationship between religion and the law been historically understood in the democratic liberal state, and how do these historical understandings account for (or refute the possibility of) religious difference? How might contemporary socio-cultural developments – like the recent refusal of some Southern Baptists to serve same-sex couples – help us to uncover what assumptions the law makes about the “proper” practice of religion? Can religious freedom and individual liberty ever truly coexist in a democratic state? Fundamentally, this course attends to how the law has served to shape both religious practices and normative values. As a result, students will emerge from this course with a nuanced understanding of how law, religion, and culture are not separate entities, but rather generative of one another.

Letters and Science XB1—Exploring the Liberal Arts (2 units)
Department: 
Electives
Department Abbreviation: 
XL&S
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Electives do not fulfill University or breadth requirements, but are great opportunities to enrich your schedule in areas you find interesting.
Course Description: 

Get introduced to the intellectual landscape of the College of Letters and Science, revealing the underlying assumptions, goals and structure of a liberal arts education. Topics include the difference between the College of Letters and Science and the professional schools, the rationale behind the breadth requirement, the approaches and methodologies of each of the divisions in the college, and the benefits of engaging in research as an undergraduate. The ultimate goal of the course is to transform you into an informed participant in your educational experiences so that you can make the most of your years at Berkeley. One-and-a-half hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Linguistics XB55AC—The American Languages (4 units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XLINGUI
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Using a linguistic view of the history, society and culture of the United States, explore the variety of languages spoken in our country and the issues surrounding them: language and ethnicity, politics of linguistic pluralism versus societal monolingualism, language and education, language shift, loss, retention and renewal. Languages include English (standard and nonstandard, African-American English), pidgins and creoles, Native American languages, Spanish, French, and immigrant languages from Asia and Europe. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Mathematics XB16A—Analytic Geometry and Calculus (3 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XMATH
Examples of Intended Majors: 
Business Administration (Haas), Architecture, Economics, Public Health, Environmental Sciences
Prerequisite: 

Three years of high school mathematics, including trigonometry, plus a satisfactory grade in one of the following: CEEB MAT test, an AP test, the UC/CSU math diagnostic exam or Math 32. It is strongly recommended that you take 16A only if you have already completed precalculus. Students will not receive credit for 16A after taking 1A. Two units of Math 16A may be used to remove a deficient grade in Math 1A.

Satisfies: 
Quantitative Reasoning requirement if completed with a grade of C− or better. Some majors have specific grade requirements. Fulfills prerequisites for several social science majors.
Course Description: 

Math 16A covers much of the same basic topics as Math 1A, but does not include in-depth calculus and does not prepare you to continue on to Match 53 or 54. Math 16A introduces integration, the fundamental theorem of calculus, areas in the plane and other applications of the definite integral. This course is intended for students in the life and social sciences whose programs require only one year of calculus.Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Topics Covered: 
Functions, derivatives of simple functions, logarithms and exponentials, as well as applications of the derivative, including rate of change, techniques of graphing, optimization problems, related rates and differentials.
Skills Needed: 
  • Facility with a scientific calculator or graphing calculator may be required
    • Ability to determine the value of a complicated expression using a scientific or graphing calculator
  • Facility with fractions
    • Ability to simplify rational expressions and solve rational equations
  • Facility with algebra
    • Ability to solve linear equations
    • Ability to solve quadratic equations by factoring, completing the square and using the quadratic formula
    • Ability to solve a linear system of equations
  • Facility with graphing
    • Ability to identify and plot points on the Cartesian plane
    • Ability to graph lines
  • Facility with exponential and logarithmic functions
    • Familiarity with e and natural logarithms
    • Ability to simplify expressions containing logarithms
    • Ability to solve logarithmic equations
    • Ability to graph exponential and logarithmic functions
  • Facility with trigonometry
    • Familiarity with radian measure
    • Ability to compute trigonometric functions of simple angles
    • Ability to use the Pythagorean Theorem
    • Ability to solve triangle using the Law of Sines or the Law of Cosines
  • Knowledge of addition formula for sine and cosine
Mathematics XB1A—Calculus (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XMATH
Examples of Intended Majors: 
Physical Sciences, Engineering, Mathematics, Computer Sciences, Molecular and Cell Biology, Economics, Astronomy, Chemistry, Geology, Statistics
Prerequisite: 

Three-and-a-half years of high school mathematics, including trigonometry and analytic geometry, plus a satisfactory grade in one of the following: CEEB MAT test, an AP test, the UC/CSU math diagnostic test or Math 32. It is strongly recommended that you take 1A only if you have already completed precalculus.

Satisfies: 
Quantitative Reasoning requirement if completed with a grade of C− or better. Some majors have specific grade requirements. Students will not receive credit for 1A after taking 16B and 2 units after taking 16A. Math 1A is required to continue on to Math 53 or 54 and are prerequisites for physical science, computer science and math majors. Life science majors also accept this series.
Course Description: 

Math 1A covers the topics of calculus of one variable, mainly with derivatives, and applications such as graphing and optimization. It introduces the idea of integration and applications such as volumes of revolution. Students are expected to understand some theorems and their proofs. This rigorous course emphasizes conceptual understanding and is intended for students in engineering and physical sciences. Three hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per week.

Topics Covered: 
Intuitive and precise limit definitions, continuity, definition of the derivative, shortcut rules for finding derivatives, product rule, quotient rule, chain rule, implicit differentiation, related rates, linear approximations and differentials, mean value theorem, L'Hopital's rule, curve sketching, optimization, Newton's Method, definition of Riemann integral, Fundamental Theorem of Calculus (Parts 1 and 2), natural logarithm defined as an integral, area between two curves, volumes of solids of revolution.
Skills Needed: 
  • Facility with a scientific calculator or graphing calculator may be required
    • Ability to determine the value of a complicated expression using a scientific or graphing calculator
  • Facility with fractions
    • Ability to simplify rational expressions and solve rational equations
  • Facility with algebra
    • Ability to solve linear equations
    • Ability to solve quadratic equations by factoring, completing the square and using the quadratic formula
    • Ability to solve a linear system of equations
  • Facility with graphing
    • Ability to identify and plot points on the Cartesian plane
    • Ability to graph lines
  • Facility with exponential and logarithmic functions
    • Familiarity with e and natural logarithms
    • Ability to simplify expressions containing logarithms
    • Ability to solve logarithmic equations
      • Ability to graph exponential and logarithmic functions
  • Facility with trigonometry
    • Familiarity with radian measure
    • Ability to compute trigonometric functions of simple angles
    • Ability to use the Pythagorean Theorem
    • Ability to solve triangle using the Law of Sines or the Law of Cosines
    • Knowledge of addition formula for sine and cosine
Mathematics XB1B—Calculus (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XMATH
Examples of Intended Majors: 
Physical Sciences, Engineering, Mathematics, Computer Sciences, Molecular and Cell Biology, Economics, Astronomy, Chemistry, Geology, Statistics
Prerequisite: 

Math 1A or equivalent coursework; please check Assist.org or with the Office of Undergraduate Admissions to make sure your coursework is equivalent to UC Berkeley's Math 1A.

Satisfies: 
Quantitative Reasoning requirement if completed with a grade of C− or better. Some majors have specific grade requirements. Students taking 1B after 16B receive only 2 units for 1B. Math 1B is required to continue on to Math 53 or 54 and are prerequisites for physical science, computer science and math majors. Life science majors also accept this series.
Course Description: 

Math 1B is a continuation of Math 1A. It involves integration techniques and applications and introduces infinite series and first- and second-order differential equations and their uses. It is intended for students with majors in engineering, math and some sciences. Three hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per week.

Topics Covered: 
Integration by parts; trigonometric integrals; trigonometric substitution; partial fractions; midpoint, trapezoid and Simpson’s rules; improper integrals; arc length; area of a surface of revolution; sequences and series; integral test; comparison tests; alternating series; ratio test; root test; power series; Taylor series; binomial series; modeling with differential equations; direction fields; Euler’s method; separable equations; exponential growth and decay; logistic equation; linear differential equations; homogeneous and nonhomogeneous second-order linear differential equations and their applications; series solutions for second-order differential equations.
Skills Needed: 
  • Facility with a scientific calculator or graphing calculator may be required
    • Ability to determine the value of a complicated expression using a scientific or graphing calculator
  • Facility with fractions
    • Ability to simplify rational expressions and solve rational equations
  • Facility with algebra
    • Ability to solve linear equations
    • Ability to solve quadratic equations by factoring, completing the square and using the quadratic formula
    • Ability to solve a linear system of equations
  • Facility with graphing
    • Ability to identify and plot points on the Cartesian plane
    • Ability to graph lines
  • Facility with exponential and logarithmic functions
    • Familiarity with e and natural logarithms
    • Ability to simplify expressions containing logarithms
    • Ability to solve logarithmic equations
    • Ability to graph exponential and logarithmic functions
  • Facility with trigonometry
    • Familiarity with radian measure
    • Ability to compute trigonometric functions of simple angles
    • Ability to use the Pythagorean Theorem
    • Ability to solve triangle using the Law of Sines or the Law of Cosines
    • Knowledge of addition formula for sine and cosine
  • Facility with differentiation
    • Knowledge that a derivative can be interpreted as a rate of change or the slope of a tangent line
    • Ability to compute the derivative of elementary functions
    • Ability to use the product, quotient and chain rules
    • Ability to differentiate implicitly
  • Facility with integration
    • Ability to compute volumes of solids of revolution
    • Ability to integrate using u-substitution
Mathematics XB32—Precalculus (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XMATH
Examples of Intended Majors: 
Any major that requires Math 16A or Math 1A
Prerequisite: 

Three years of high school mathematics and at least a score of 560 on the SAT I Math portion. Email fpf@berkeley.edu if you need to take math but have scored below a 560 on the SAT I.

Satisfies: 
Quantitative Reasoning requirement if completed with a grade of C− or better. Some majors have specific grade requirements. You will not receive credit for Math XB32 after taking Math 1A–1B or 16A–16B and will receive 3 units after taking Math 96.
Course Description: 

This course is designed for students who wish to prepare for calculus. It covers exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometry, complex numbers, binomial theorem, conics and analytic geometry. Three hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per week.

Topics Covered: 
Factoring polynomials, quadratic equations, equations of lines, symmetry and graphs, one-dimensional inequalities, definition and graph of a function, techniques of graphing, composition of functions, inverse of a function, linear functions, quadratic functions, polynomial functions, rational functions, quadratic optimization problems, exponential and logarithmic functions, properties of logarithms, equations and inequalities with logarithms, compound interest, exponential growth and decay, trigonometric functions, right triangle applications, trigonometric identities, radian measure of angles, graphs of the six trigonometric functions, addition formula for trigonometric functions, double angle formulas, product-to-sum and sum-to-product formulas, trigonometric equations, inverse trigonometric functions, law of sines, law of cosines, vectors, parametric equations and polar coordinates.
Skills Needed: 
  • Facility with a scientific calculator or graphing calculator may be required
    • Ability to determine the value of a complicated expression using a scientific or graphing calculator
  • Facility with fractions
    • Ability to simplify rational expressions and solve rational equations
  • Facility with algebra
    • Ability to solve linear equations
    • Ability to solve quadratic equations by factoring, completing the square and using the quadratic formula
    • Ability to solve a linear system of equations
  • Facility with graphing
    • Ability to identify and plot points on the Cartesian plane
    • Ability to graph lines
Middle Eastern Studies XB10—Introduction to Middle Eastern Studies (4 units)
Department: 
International Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XMESTU
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Either the International Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Get introduced to the study of the contemporary Middle East and North Africa, with an emphasis on historical trajectories; political, social and cultural transformations; and religious phenomena. It covers topics related to the Arab world, Turkey, Iran and Israel from an interdisciplinary perspective. The intended audience for the course is Middle Eastern Studies majors, prospective majors and minors, for whom it fulfills the lower-division requirement, as well as students in other majors interested in the Middle East. Three hours of lecture per week.

Molecular and Cell Biology XB32—Introduction to Human Physiology (3 units)
Department: 
Biological Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XMCELLB
Prerequisite: 

One year of high school or college chemistry

Satisfies: 
Biological Science breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

You gain a comprehensive introduction to human cell biology by concentrating on basic mechanisms underlying human life processes, including cells and membranes; nerve and muscle function; cardiovascular, respiratory, renal and gastrointestinal physiology; and metabolism, endocrinology and reproduction. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Music XB27—Introduction to Western Music (4 units)
Department: 
Arts and Literature
Department Abbreviation: 
XMUSIC
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Arts and Literature breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

This course is devoted to the development of listening skills and appreciation of the major forms of Western art music. It is not intended for music majors. The guided listening, lectures and discussions present music as a language in which students can develop a basic fluency. The recorded music used in the course covers the gamut of Western art music from the Renaissance to the present day. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Philosophy XB2—Individual Morality and Social Justice (4 units)
Department: 
Philosophy and Values
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XPHILOS
Prerequisite: 

None; however, this is a writing- and reading-intensive course, and students' writing skills should exceed the College Writing course level.

Satisfies: 
Either the Philosophy and Values or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Survey the basic questions of moral and political philosophy and some important attempts to answer them, with particular attention to topical issues (abortion, the ethics of eating animals and gay marriage, for example). What is the moral thing to do with respect to these issues? Is there a fact of the matter what the moral thing to do is, or does it depend on one's feelings, upbringing or culture? Why should we do what is morally right? Why should we tolerate alien moral beliefs and practices? What role should governments play? Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Philosophy XB3—The Nature of Mind (4 units)
Department: 
Philosophy and Values
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XPHILOS
Prerequisite: 

None; however, this is a writing- and reading-intensive course, and students' writing skills should exceed the College Writing course level.

Satisfies: 
Philosophy and Values breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Gain an introduction to the philosophy of mind, and to philosophical reading, writing and thinking. What is it to have a mind? What kinds of properties are so-called mental properties? What is the connection between knowledge of one's own mental states and knowledge of the mental states of others? What is the connection between knowledge of one's own mental states and knowledge of the world around us? What are we doing when we explain people's behavior in terms of their beliefs, desires and other contenful states? You will also examine the ways in which the nature of our mental states can be said to depend on our relations to features of our environment. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Political Science XB1—Introduction to American Politics (4 units)
Department: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XPOLXCI
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade.
Course Description: 

Get an introductory analysis of the structure and operations of the American political system, primarily at the national level. Three hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per week.

Political Science XB2—Introduction to Comparative Politics (4 units)
Department: 
International Studies
Department Abbreviation: 
XPOLSCI
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Either the International Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Gain a comparative study of countries and their different levels of economic and political development. Examine what they are like; how they came to be the way they are; and their particular expression in Western, Communist and Third-World settings. Topics include the nature of power, processes of politics, and the cultural and social forces that have given countries their distinctive identities. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Psychology XB1—General Psychology (3 units)
Department: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XPSYCH
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Examine a representative sample of topics in psychology, including the operation of neurons and the brain; animal behavior; sensory and perceptual processes; obedience to authority; and theories of personality, mental disorders and psychotherapy. Topics also include the history of psychology (with brief readings from Plato, Darwin, James, Freud and Watson), recent ideas about the role of consciousness in cognition and computer modeling of cognitive processes. Two hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Rhetoric XB2—Fundamentals of Public Speaking (2 units)
Department: 
Electives
Department Abbreviation: 
XRHETOR
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Electives do not fulfill University or breadth requirements, but are great opportunities to enrich your schedule in areas you find interesting.
Course Description: 

Gain help in establishing and developing basic competence in the skills required for effective oral presentations, whether prepared in advance or spontaneous. You cover formulating a clear communicative intent, basic principles of communication and theories of persuasion, organization of presentation material, delivery, use of visual aids and response to audience questions. You make six different oral presentations during the term, with ample opportunity for ungraded practice and coaching prior to evaluation. Three hours of class per week. This course is offered only on a Passed/Not Passed basis. Although this course does not satisfy a College of Letters and Science breadth requirement, units are granted.

Rhetoric XBR1A—The Craft of Writing: Berkeley Campus (4 units)
Enroll: 
first-half of R&C
Department Abbreviation: 
XRHETOR
Prerequisite: 

Completion of the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement or UC Analytical Writing Placement Exam

Satisfies: 
The first-half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

Learn the principles of argumentative writing and emphasizes close readings of texts that reveal their rhetorical structure and intended audience. You learn to identify and interpret a text's thesis and intention and make compelling arguments for your position using textual evidence. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections
Rhetoric R1A-1
Is Science More Persuasive than your Grandmother?

Instructor: Tick

 

Does evidence or logic "speak for itself"?  Are polls more persuasive than politicians?  What is evidence?  Is data "truth"?  Is video of a police action different from an NBA replay? Plato, politics, religion, fiction, the ethics of New Media and Big Data; rhetoric connects these topics.  Using basic rhetorical theory as a flexible, critical tool, we'll consider evidence, social and psychological factors of persuasion, how arguments are constructed, and the role of audience/user in design.  And, absolutely, we'll look at real-time political rhetoric. Rhetoric invites you to think strategically, critically, and be responsible for what you create, especially in writing.  In this class, we will focus on   what you want to accomplish when you communicate, and how to design persuasive presentations to be effective.


Rhetoric R1A-2
Archaeological Readers: Rhetorically Excavating Issues through Close Reading, Critical Thinking, Argumentative Writing 

Instructor: Borst-Rothe

 

Most incoming students are not prepared for the expected level of critical thinking writing, and speaking--skills important at the university and in professional settings. This course will focus on the Rhetorical Framework: identifying critical issues in different disciplines, analyzing style and structure in different arguments, and learning to argue logically and persuasively about authorial intention using textual evidence. Two units focus on the importance of California: one related to the rhetoric of place as a California dream, the other illustrating California's importance in the arts for visual artists, writers, film makers, and photographers. Just as important are units focusing on critical contemporary issues ranging from issues in healthcare to mass incarceration. You'll also have a change to explore the museums (SFMOMA or Berkeley's BAMPFA) as an experiential option in the Art Unit. All writing assignments will focus on modern-day application of classical rhetorical structure, applicable to any field of study, just as brief presentations will help you practice professional speaking. And class discussion, small group work, as well as seminar-style participation will open up the value, the excitement of translating your ideas into clear persuasive arguments, not mere opinions, that you as the next generation of leaders will need. I look forward to taking this archaeological journey with you!

 

Sociology XB3AC—Principles of Sociology: American Cultures (4 units)
Department: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XSOCIOL
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and the Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Comparing the experience of three out of five ethnic groups (i.e., African Americans, Asian Americans, Chicanos/Latinos, European Americans and Native Americans), you examine historically how each people entered American society and built communities and transformed their cultures in the process. Gain an introduction to the sociological perspective; characteristic methods of research; and key concepts such as culture, community, class, race, social change and social movements. Three hours of lecture per week.

Statistics XB2—Introduction to Statistics (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XSTAT
Examples of Intended Majors: 
Psychology, Political Economy, Development Studies, Legal Studies, Nutritional Science: Dietetics, Nutritional Science: Physiology and Metabolism
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Quantitative Reasoning requirement if completed with a grade of C− or better. Some majors have specific grade requirements. Statistics 2 fulfills prerequisites for some social science majors, such as psychology. It does not fulfill prerequisites for the economics major, statistics major or the Haas Undergraduate Business Program.
Course Description: 

This course introduces basic concepts of probability and statistical inference and covers standard methods for making inferences about populations from information contained in sample data: the methods used in sample surveys, opinion polls, research studies and industry. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Topics Covered: 
Populations, statistics, variables, observational studies versus experiments, graphs of data, descriptive measures of location and spread, normal approximation, correlation, the regression line, Simpson’s paradox, probability, binomial and normal distributions, and the behavior of the average of samples, as well as inference methods such as estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis tests for averages and percentages, and the chi-square test.
Skills Needed: 
  • Facility with a scientific calculator or graphing calculator may be required
    • Ability to determine the value of a complicated expression using a scientific or graphing calculator
  • Facility with fractions
    • Ability to simplify rational expressions and solve rational equations
  • Facility with algebra
    • Ability to solve linear equations
    • Ability to solve quadratic equations by factoring, completing the square and using the quadratic formula
    • Ability to solve a linear system of equations
  • Facility with graphing
    • Ability to identify and plot points on the Cartesian plane
    • Ability to graph lines

Breadth Courses

The College of Letters and Science Seven-Course Breadth requirement and American Cultures Breadth requirement are the foundation of the college's liberal arts program. It can only be fulfilled with college coursework; AP exams and other high school work do not count toward this requirement.

= Courses that also fulfill the American Cultures requirement

Arts and Literature

Classics XB10A—Introduction to Greek Civilization (4 units)
Department: 
Arts and Literature
Historical Studies
Philosophy and Values
Department Abbreviation: 
XCLASSI
Prerequisite: 

None; however, this is a writing- and reading-intensive course, and your writing skills should exceed the College Writing course level

Satisfies: 
Either the Arts and Literature, Historical Studies, or Philosophy and Values breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Get an introductory survey of Greek civilization from the Bronze Age to 4th-century B.C.E. ancient Greece. One of several civilizations of the ancient Mediterranean, Greek civilization has had an enduring influence on many areas of Western thought and culture, and its surviving literature includes several works that continue to stand among the world's most significant. The study of this culture, in both its similarities and differences with our own, helps us understand contemporary individual and societal conflict. You read and discuss works of several different types of literature, including epic poetry, lyric poetry, tragedy, comedy, history and philosophy. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Music XB27—Introduction to Western Music (4 units)
Department: 
Arts and Literature
Department Abbreviation: 
XMUSIC
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Arts and Literature breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

This course is devoted to the development of listening skills and appreciation of the major forms of Western art music. It is not intended for music majors. The guided listening, lectures and discussions present music as a language in which students can develop a basic fluency. The recorded music used in the course covers the gamut of Western art music from the Renaissance to the present day. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

History of Art XB11—Introduction to Western Art: Renaissance to the Present (4 units)
Department: 
Arts and Literature
Historical Studies
Department Abbreviation: 
XHISTAR
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Either the Arts and Literature or Historical Studies breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

An introduction to the historical circumstances and visual character of Western art from the Renaissance to the present, this course is not a chronological survey but an exploration of topics and themes central to this period. For example: What tasks did painting and sculpture perform in the past? For whom and at whose expense? How do the rise of landscape painting, the cult of the artist and the new emphasis on the nude relate to the emergence of modern society? Do stylistic labels like classicism, realism, impressionism and modernism help answer such questions? This course is recommended for potential art majors and for students in other disciplines, both humanities and sciences. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

English XB31AC—Literature of American Cultures (4 Units)
Department: 
Arts and Literature
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XENGLIS
Prerequisite: 

None; however, this is a writing- and reading-intensive course, and your writing skills should exceed the College Writing course level.

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and the Arts and Literature breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Get an introduction to short stories, poems, memoirs and essays by contemporary African-American, Latin American, Asian-American, Native American and Middle Eastern American authors. Reading transports us to new worlds where we can encounter different, sometimes unsettling voices. Discussing and then writing about these diverse texts will not only deepen your appreciation for your own familial and cultural legacies, but will also help you become more open to those of others. This course is open to all students, but especially recommended for prospective English majors and for students who have satisfied the R&C requirement and wish to develop college-level reading, analytic and writing skills. Three hours of lecture per week.

Biological Science

Geography XB30—The Ocean World (4 units)
Department: 
Biological Science
Physical Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XGEOG
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Either the Biological Science or the Physical Science category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Gain an introduction to the cultural and physical geography of the world's oceans. Topics include ecology of ocean biota and environments; history and geography of ocean peoples, cultures and resource use; problems confronting ocean peoples and environments; and new approaches to saving the oceans. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Integrative Biology XB33—The Age of Dinosaurs (3 units)
Department: 
Biological Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XINTEGB
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Biological Science breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

In this lecture course, focus on dinosaurs from their appearance to extinction. Learn about the dinosaur skeleton, reconstructing dinosaurs, basic principles of evolution, classification and adaptation, and a survey of dinosaur types. You consider dinosaur reproduction, the question of dinosaur endothermy and the origin of birds. You also survey the other animals that coexisted with the dinosaurs to build a picture of the Mesozoic world. Lectures are often illustrated with slides. Three hours of lecture per week.

Molecular and Cell Biology XB32—Introduction to Human Physiology (3 units)
Department: 
Biological Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XMCELLB
Prerequisite: 

One year of high school or college chemistry

Satisfies: 
Biological Science breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

You gain a comprehensive introduction to human cell biology by concentrating on basic mechanisms underlying human life processes, including cells and membranes; nerve and muscle function; cardiovascular, respiratory, renal and gastrointestinal physiology; and metabolism, endocrinology and reproduction. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Integrative Biology XB31—The Ecology and Evolution of Animal Behavior (3 units)
Department: 
Biological Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XINTEGB
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Biological Science breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Learn about the principles of evolution biology as they relate to animal behavior and behavioral ecology with a broad coverage of animal groups. This course is designed for those not specializing in biology. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Anthropology XB1—Introduction to Biological Anthropology (4 units)
Department: 
Biological Science
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XANTHRO
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Either the Biological Science or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

This course will provide the student with an introduction to the discipline of anthropological archaeology with a special emphasis on how archaeology contributes to our understanding of American society and the cultures from which it is drawn. Students will learn about the methods, goals, and theoretical concepts of archaeology with attention to the impact archaeology has had on the construction of the histories of diverse communities−Native Americans, African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos, and European Americans. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Historical Studies

Classics XB10A—Introduction to Greek Civilization (4 units)
Department: 
Arts and Literature
Historical Studies
Philosophy and Values
Department Abbreviation: 
XCLASSI
Prerequisite: 

None; however, this is a writing- and reading-intensive course, and your writing skills should exceed the College Writing course level

Satisfies: 
Either the Arts and Literature, Historical Studies, or Philosophy and Values breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Get an introductory survey of Greek civilization from the Bronze Age to 4th-century B.C.E. ancient Greece. One of several civilizations of the ancient Mediterranean, Greek civilization has had an enduring influence on many areas of Western thought and culture, and its surviving literature includes several works that continue to stand among the world's most significant. The study of this culture, in both its similarities and differences with our own, helps us understand contemporary individual and societal conflict. You read and discuss works of several different types of literature, including epic poetry, lyric poetry, tragedy, comedy, history and philosophy. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Asian American Studies XB20A—Introduction to the History of Asians in the United States (4 units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XASAMST
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Either the Historical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Examine critical aspects of Asian-American histories and experiences from 1848 to the present. Gain a historical framework for a basic understanding of the experiences of the major Asian-American groups and an analytical foundation for comparative analyses. You will understand national and international factors that have an impact on migration and related policies; intersecting issues of race, class and gender relations; interclass conflicts between labor and capital; and intraclass conflicts as evidenced by labor agitation against Asian migration and resettlement. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Ethnic Studies XB21AC—A Comparative Survey of Racial and Ethnic Groups in the United States (4 units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XETHSTD
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Examine the historical experiences of European immigrants, African Americans and Latinos, emphasizing the themes of migration and economic change since the late-19th century. You will also learn about the experiences of Asian Americans, Native Americans and recently arrived immigrants in the context of the course themes. Throughout the course, discuss intragroup differences such as gender, socioeconomic stratification and cultural variation. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

History of Art XB11—Introduction to Western Art: Renaissance to the Present (4 units)
Department: 
Arts and Literature
Historical Studies
Department Abbreviation: 
XHISTAR
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Either the Arts and Literature or Historical Studies breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

An introduction to the historical circumstances and visual character of Western art from the Renaissance to the present, this course is not a chronological survey but an exploration of topics and themes central to this period. For example: What tasks did painting and sculpture perform in the past? For whom and at whose expense? How do the rise of landscape painting, the cult of the artist and the new emphasis on the nude relate to the emergence of modern society? Do stylistic labels like classicism, realism, impressionism and modernism help answer such questions? This course is recommended for potential art majors and for students in other disciplines, both humanities and sciences. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Linguistics XB55AC—The American Languages (4 units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XLINGUI
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Using a linguistic view of the history, society and culture of the United States, explore the variety of languages spoken in our country and the issues surrounding them: language and ethnicity, politics of linguistic pluralism versus societal monolingualism, language and education, language shift, loss, retention and renewal. Languages include English (standard and nonstandard, African-American English), pidgins and creoles, Native American languages, Spanish, French, and immigrant languages from Asia and Europe. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Anthropology XB2AC—Introduction to Archaeology (4 Units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XANTHRO
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the HIstorical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade.
Course Description: 

Gain an introduction to the discipline of anthropological archaeology with a special emphasis on how archaeology contributes to our understanding of American society and the cultures from which it is drawn. You will learn about the methods, goals and theoretical concepts of archaeology, with attention to the impact archaeology has had on the construction of the histories of diverse communities, such as Native Americans, African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos and European Americans. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

History XB7B (AC)—The United States From Civil War to Present (4 units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XHISTOR
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade.
Course Description: 

Examine the experiences and conflicts that comprise American society's history. You will be exposed to a wide range of historical actors and dialogues in order to understand the past, from the perspective of the men and women who experienced it and to gain some insight into the daily lives of Americans: work and leisure, cultures and ideologies, relations with one another, and the political and economic system under which they lived. Lectures and readings focus on the complex interplay among political, economic and cultural interests, and will examine, in particular depth, race relations, the laboring classes, reform movements, the interior of American lives, the changing conditions for success and survival in the culture Americans were shaping, and the emerging role of the United States as a world power. Three hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per week.

Environmental Science Policy and Management XB50AC - Introduction to Culture and Natural Resource Management (4 units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Philosophy and Values
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XESPM
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies, Philosophy and Values, or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Learn how culture affects the way we use and manage fire, wildlands and urban forests, rangelands, parks and preserves, and croplands in America. The basic concepts and tools for evaluating the role of culture in resource use and management are introduced and used to examine the experience of American cultural groups in the development and management of Western natural resources. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

International Studies

Middle Eastern Studies XB10—Introduction to Middle Eastern Studies (4 units)
Department: 
International Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XMESTU
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Either the International Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Get introduced to the study of the contemporary Middle East and North Africa, with an emphasis on historical trajectories; political, social and cultural transformations; and religious phenomena. It covers topics related to the Arab world, Turkey, Iran and Israel from an interdisciplinary perspective. The intended audience for the course is Middle Eastern Studies majors, prospective majors and minors, for whom it fulfills the lower-division requirement, as well as students in other majors interested in the Middle East. Three hours of lecture per week.

Political Science XB2—Introduction to Comparative Politics (4 units)
Department: 
International Studies
Department Abbreviation: 
XPOLSCI
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Either the International Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Gain a comparative study of countries and their different levels of economic and political development. Examine what they are like; how they came to be the way they are; and their particular expression in Western, Communist and Third-World settings. Topics include the nature of power, processes of politics, and the cultural and social forces that have given countries their distinctive identities. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Philosophy and Values

Classics XB10A—Introduction to Greek Civilization (4 units)
Department: 
Arts and Literature
Historical Studies
Philosophy and Values
Department Abbreviation: 
XCLASSI
Prerequisite: 

None; however, this is a writing- and reading-intensive course, and your writing skills should exceed the College Writing course level

Satisfies: 
Either the Arts and Literature, Historical Studies, or Philosophy and Values breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Get an introductory survey of Greek civilization from the Bronze Age to 4th-century B.C.E. ancient Greece. One of several civilizations of the ancient Mediterranean, Greek civilization has had an enduring influence on many areas of Western thought and culture, and its surviving literature includes several works that continue to stand among the world's most significant. The study of this culture, in both its similarities and differences with our own, helps us understand contemporary individual and societal conflict. You read and discuss works of several different types of literature, including epic poetry, lyric poetry, tragedy, comedy, history and philosophy. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Philosophy XB2—Individual Morality and Social Justice (4 units)
Department: 
Philosophy and Values
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XPHILOS
Prerequisite: 

None; however, this is a writing- and reading-intensive course, and students' writing skills should exceed the College Writing course level.

Satisfies: 
Either the Philosophy and Values or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Survey the basic questions of moral and political philosophy and some important attempts to answer them, with particular attention to topical issues (abortion, the ethics of eating animals and gay marriage, for example). What is the moral thing to do with respect to these issues? Is there a fact of the matter what the moral thing to do is, or does it depend on one's feelings, upbringing or culture? Why should we do what is morally right? Why should we tolerate alien moral beliefs and practices? What role should governments play? Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Philosophy XB3—The Nature of Mind (4 units)
Department: 
Philosophy and Values
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XPHILOS
Prerequisite: 

None; however, this is a writing- and reading-intensive course, and students' writing skills should exceed the College Writing course level.

Satisfies: 
Philosophy and Values breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Gain an introduction to the philosophy of mind, and to philosophical reading, writing and thinking. What is it to have a mind? What kinds of properties are so-called mental properties? What is the connection between knowledge of one's own mental states and knowledge of the mental states of others? What is the connection between knowledge of one's own mental states and knowledge of the world around us? What are we doing when we explain people's behavior in terms of their beliefs, desires and other contenful states? You will also examine the ways in which the nature of our mental states can be said to depend on our relations to features of our environment. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Environmental Science Policy and Management XB50AC - Introduction to Culture and Natural Resource Management (4 units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Philosophy and Values
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XESPM
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies, Philosophy and Values, or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Learn how culture affects the way we use and manage fire, wildlands and urban forests, rangelands, parks and preserves, and croplands in America. The basic concepts and tools for evaluating the role of culture in resource use and management are introduced and used to examine the experience of American cultural groups in the development and management of Western natural resources. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Physical Science

Geography XB30—The Ocean World (4 units)
Department: 
Biological Science
Physical Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XGEOG
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Either the Biological Science or the Physical Science category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Gain an introduction to the cultural and physical geography of the world's oceans. Topics include ecology of ocean biota and environments; history and geography of ocean peoples, cultures and resource use; problems confronting ocean peoples and environments; and new approaches to saving the oceans. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Astronomy XB10—Introduction to General Astronomy (4 units)
Department: 
Physical Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XASTRON
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Physical Science breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Cover modern astronomy with an emphasis on the structure and evolution of stars, galaxies and the universe. Additional topics optionally discussed include quasars, pulsars, black holes and extraterrestrial communications. A minimum of high school–level algebra and geometry is assumed, but equation solving and memorization are not emphasized. Most students are not physical science majors, and the emphasis is on understanding the skills used in astrophysics that are of interest to society. Students receive no credit for Astronomy 10 after taking Astronomy 7A or 7B. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Earth and Planetary Science (Geology) XB80—Environmental Earth Sciences (3 units)
Department: 
Physical Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XEPS
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Physical Science breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Survey human interactions with the planet Earth. You examine topics ranging from geologic hazards, such as earthquakes and volcanoes, to human effects on the environment, such as pollution and climate change. You also study geologic aspects of the use of land and oceans. Three hours of lecture per week.

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Asian American Studies XB20A—Introduction to the History of Asians in the United States (4 units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XASAMST
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Either the Historical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Examine critical aspects of Asian-American histories and experiences from 1848 to the present. Gain a historical framework for a basic understanding of the experiences of the major Asian-American groups and an analytical foundation for comparative analyses. You will understand national and international factors that have an impact on migration and related policies; intersecting issues of race, class and gender relations; interclass conflicts between labor and capital; and intraclass conflicts as evidenced by labor agitation against Asian migration and resettlement. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Ethnic Studies XB21AC—A Comparative Survey of Racial and Ethnic Groups in the United States (4 units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XETHSTD
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Examine the historical experiences of European immigrants, African Americans and Latinos, emphasizing the themes of migration and economic change since the late-19th century. You will also learn about the experiences of Asian Americans, Native Americans and recently arrived immigrants in the context of the course themes. Throughout the course, discuss intragroup differences such as gender, socioeconomic stratification and cultural variation. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Linguistics XB55AC—The American Languages (4 units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XLINGUI
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Using a linguistic view of the history, society and culture of the United States, explore the variety of languages spoken in our country and the issues surrounding them: language and ethnicity, politics of linguistic pluralism versus societal monolingualism, language and education, language shift, loss, retention and renewal. Languages include English (standard and nonstandard, African-American English), pidgins and creoles, Native American languages, Spanish, French, and immigrant languages from Asia and Europe. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Middle Eastern Studies XB10—Introduction to Middle Eastern Studies (4 units)
Department: 
International Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XMESTU
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Either the International Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Get introduced to the study of the contemporary Middle East and North Africa, with an emphasis on historical trajectories; political, social and cultural transformations; and religious phenomena. It covers topics related to the Arab world, Turkey, Iran and Israel from an interdisciplinary perspective. The intended audience for the course is Middle Eastern Studies majors, prospective majors and minors, for whom it fulfills the lower-division requirement, as well as students in other majors interested in the Middle East. Three hours of lecture per week.

Philosophy XB2—Individual Morality and Social Justice (4 units)
Department: 
Philosophy and Values
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XPHILOS
Prerequisite: 

None; however, this is a writing- and reading-intensive course, and students' writing skills should exceed the College Writing course level.

Satisfies: 
Either the Philosophy and Values or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Survey the basic questions of moral and political philosophy and some important attempts to answer them, with particular attention to topical issues (abortion, the ethics of eating animals and gay marriage, for example). What is the moral thing to do with respect to these issues? Is there a fact of the matter what the moral thing to do is, or does it depend on one's feelings, upbringing or culture? Why should we do what is morally right? Why should we tolerate alien moral beliefs and practices? What role should governments play? Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Gender and Women’s Studies XB10—Introduction to Gender and Women’s Studies (4 units)
Department: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XGWS
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Get an introduction to questions and concepts in gender and women's studies. Critically study the formation of gender and its intersections with other relations of power, such as sexuality, racialization, class, religion and age. Questions are addressed within the context of a transnational world. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Psychology XB1—General Psychology (3 units)
Department: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XPSYCH
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Examine a representative sample of topics in psychology, including the operation of neurons and the brain; animal behavior; sensory and perceptual processes; obedience to authority; and theories of personality, mental disorders and psychotherapy. Topics also include the history of psychology (with brief readings from Plato, Darwin, James, Freud and Watson), recent ideas about the role of consciousness in cognition and computer modeling of cognitive processes. Two hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Sociology XB3AC—Principles of Sociology: American Cultures (4 units)
Department: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XSOCIOL
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and the Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Comparing the experience of three out of five ethnic groups (i.e., African Americans, Asian Americans, Chicanos/Latinos, European Americans and Native Americans), you examine historically how each people entered American society and built communities and transformed their cultures in the process. Gain an introduction to the sociological perspective; characteristic methods of research; and key concepts such as culture, community, class, race, social change and social movements. Three hours of lecture per week.

Anthropology XB2AC—Introduction to Archaeology (4 Units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XANTHRO
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the HIstorical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade.
Course Description: 

Gain an introduction to the discipline of anthropological archaeology with a special emphasis on how archaeology contributes to our understanding of American society and the cultures from which it is drawn. You will learn about the methods, goals and theoretical concepts of archaeology, with attention to the impact archaeology has had on the construction of the histories of diverse communities, such as Native Americans, African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos and European Americans. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

History XB7B (AC)—The United States From Civil War to Present (4 units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XHISTOR
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade.
Course Description: 

Examine the experiences and conflicts that comprise American society's history. You will be exposed to a wide range of historical actors and dialogues in order to understand the past, from the perspective of the men and women who experienced it and to gain some insight into the daily lives of Americans: work and leisure, cultures and ideologies, relations with one another, and the political and economic system under which they lived. Lectures and readings focus on the complex interplay among political, economic and cultural interests, and will examine, in particular depth, race relations, the laboring classes, reform movements, the interior of American lives, the changing conditions for success and survival in the culture Americans were shaping, and the emerging role of the United States as a world power. Three hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per week.

Philosophy XB3—The Nature of Mind (4 units)
Department: 
Philosophy and Values
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XPHILOS
Prerequisite: 

None; however, this is a writing- and reading-intensive course, and students' writing skills should exceed the College Writing course level.

Satisfies: 
Philosophy and Values breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Gain an introduction to the philosophy of mind, and to philosophical reading, writing and thinking. What is it to have a mind? What kinds of properties are so-called mental properties? What is the connection between knowledge of one's own mental states and knowledge of the mental states of others? What is the connection between knowledge of one's own mental states and knowledge of the world around us? What are we doing when we explain people's behavior in terms of their beliefs, desires and other contenful states? You will also examine the ways in which the nature of our mental states can be said to depend on our relations to features of our environment. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Political Science XB1—Introduction to American Politics (4 units)
Department: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XPOLXCI
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade.
Course Description: 

Get an introductory analysis of the structure and operations of the American political system, primarily at the national level. Three hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per week.

Anthropology XB1—Introduction to Biological Anthropology (4 units)
Department: 
Biological Science
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XANTHRO
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Either the Biological Science or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

This course will provide the student with an introduction to the discipline of anthropological archaeology with a special emphasis on how archaeology contributes to our understanding of American society and the cultures from which it is drawn. Students will learn about the methods, goals, and theoretical concepts of archaeology with attention to the impact archaeology has had on the construction of the histories of diverse communities−Native Americans, African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos, and European Americans. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Environmental Science Policy and Management XB50AC - Introduction to Culture and Natural Resource Management (4 units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Philosophy and Values
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XESPM
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies, Philosophy and Values, or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Learn how culture affects the way we use and manage fire, wildlands and urban forests, rangelands, parks and preserves, and croplands in America. The basic concepts and tools for evaluating the role of culture in resource use and management are introduced and used to examine the experience of American cultural groups in the development and management of Western natural resources. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Electives

Letters and Science XB1—Exploring the Liberal Arts (2 units)
Department: 
Electives
Department Abbreviation: 
XL&S
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Electives do not fulfill University or breadth requirements, but are great opportunities to enrich your schedule in areas you find interesting.
Course Description: 

Get introduced to the intellectual landscape of the College of Letters and Science, revealing the underlying assumptions, goals and structure of a liberal arts education. Topics include the difference between the College of Letters and Science and the professional schools, the rationale behind the breadth requirement, the approaches and methodologies of each of the divisions in the college, and the benefits of engaging in research as an undergraduate. The ultimate goal of the course is to transform you into an informed participant in your educational experiences so that you can make the most of your years at Berkeley. One-and-a-half hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Rhetoric XB2—Fundamentals of Public Speaking (2 units)
Department: 
Electives
Department Abbreviation: 
XRHETOR
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Electives do not fulfill University or breadth requirements, but are great opportunities to enrich your schedule in areas you find interesting.
Course Description: 

Gain help in establishing and developing basic competence in the skills required for effective oral presentations, whether prepared in advance or spontaneous. You cover formulating a clear communicative intent, basic principles of communication and theories of persuasion, organization of presentation material, delivery, use of visual aids and response to audience questions. You make six different oral presentations during the term, with ample opportunity for ungraded practice and coaching prior to evaluation. Three hours of class per week. This course is offered only on a Passed/Not Passed basis. Although this course does not satisfy a College of Letters and Science breadth requirement, units are granted.

Art XB98—Symbolic and Practical: Art and Social Justice (2 Units)
Department: 
Electives
Department Abbreviation: 
XART
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Electives do not fulfill University or breadth requirements, but are great opportunities to enrich your schedule in areas you find interesting.
Course Description: 

Artists have long made works that address issues of justice, equity, freedom and oppression. These works, and the strategies artists employ, are frequently informed by, produced through or in dialogue with social movements that seek to alter the conditions of society. The relationship between art and social movements raises questions about what it means to do art and what it means to do social justice. In order to explore the overlaps, tensions, and distinctions between the symbolic and practical practices of artists and social movements, this course combines student experimentation, readings, videos, discussion and site visits throughout the San Francisco Bay Area.

Pending Academic Senate Approval

Earth and Planetary Science (Geology) XBC20—Earthquakes in Your Backyard (3 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XEPS
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Physical Science breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

 Introduction to earthquakes, their causes and effects. General discussion of basic principles and methods of seismology and geological tectonics, distribution of earthquakes in space and time, effects of earthquakes, and earthquake hazard and risk, with particular emphasis on the situation in California.

Your Math and Statistics Courses

You may have already fulfilled the L&S Quantitative Reasoning requirement, but your intended major(s) may require math courses. 

Mathematics XB32—Precalculus (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XMATH
Examples of Intended Majors: 
Any major that requires Math 16A or Math 1A
Prerequisite: 

Three years of high school mathematics and at least a score of 560 on the SAT I Math portion. Email fpf@berkeley.edu if you need to take math but have scored below a 560 on the SAT I.

Satisfies: 
Quantitative Reasoning requirement if completed with a grade of C− or better. Some majors have specific grade requirements. You will not receive credit for Math XB32 after taking Math 1A–1B or 16A–16B and will receive 3 units after taking Math 96.
Course Description: 

This course is designed for students who wish to prepare for calculus. It covers exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometry, complex numbers, binomial theorem, conics and analytic geometry. Three hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per week.

Topics Covered: 
Factoring polynomials, quadratic equations, equations of lines, symmetry and graphs, one-dimensional inequalities, definition and graph of a function, techniques of graphing, composition of functions, inverse of a function, linear functions, quadratic functions, polynomial functions, rational functions, quadratic optimization problems, exponential and logarithmic functions, properties of logarithms, equations and inequalities with logarithms, compound interest, exponential growth and decay, trigonometric functions, right triangle applications, trigonometric identities, radian measure of angles, graphs of the six trigonometric functions, addition formula for trigonometric functions, double angle formulas, product-to-sum and sum-to-product formulas, trigonometric equations, inverse trigonometric functions, law of sines, law of cosines, vectors, parametric equations and polar coordinates.
Skills Needed: 
  • Facility with a scientific calculator or graphing calculator may be required
    • Ability to determine the value of a complicated expression using a scientific or graphing calculator
  • Facility with fractions
    • Ability to simplify rational expressions and solve rational equations
  • Facility with algebra
    • Ability to solve linear equations
    • Ability to solve quadratic equations by factoring, completing the square and using the quadratic formula
    • Ability to solve a linear system of equations
  • Facility with graphing
    • Ability to identify and plot points on the Cartesian plane
    • Ability to graph lines
Mathematics XB16A—Analytic Geometry and Calculus (3 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XMATH
Examples of Intended Majors: 
Business Administration (Haas), Architecture, Economics, Public Health, Environmental Sciences
Prerequisite: 

Three years of high school mathematics, including trigonometry, plus a satisfactory grade in one of the following: CEEB MAT test, an AP test, the UC/CSU math diagnostic exam or Math 32. It is strongly recommended that you take 16A only if you have already completed precalculus. Students will not receive credit for 16A after taking 1A. Two units of Math 16A may be used to remove a deficient grade in Math 1A.

Satisfies: 
Quantitative Reasoning requirement if completed with a grade of C− or better. Some majors have specific grade requirements. Fulfills prerequisites for several social science majors.
Course Description: 

Math 16A covers much of the same basic topics as Math 1A, but does not include in-depth calculus and does not prepare you to continue on to Match 53 or 54. Math 16A introduces integration, the fundamental theorem of calculus, areas in the plane and other applications of the definite integral. This course is intended for students in the life and social sciences whose programs require only one year of calculus.Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Topics Covered: 
Functions, derivatives of simple functions, logarithms and exponentials, as well as applications of the derivative, including rate of change, techniques of graphing, optimization problems, related rates and differentials.
Skills Needed: 
  • Facility with a scientific calculator or graphing calculator may be required
    • Ability to determine the value of a complicated expression using a scientific or graphing calculator
  • Facility with fractions
    • Ability to simplify rational expressions and solve rational equations
  • Facility with algebra
    • Ability to solve linear equations
    • Ability to solve quadratic equations by factoring, completing the square and using the quadratic formula
    • Ability to solve a linear system of equations
  • Facility with graphing
    • Ability to identify and plot points on the Cartesian plane
    • Ability to graph lines
  • Facility with exponential and logarithmic functions
    • Familiarity with e and natural logarithms
    • Ability to simplify expressions containing logarithms
    • Ability to solve logarithmic equations
    • Ability to graph exponential and logarithmic functions
  • Facility with trigonometry
    • Familiarity with radian measure
    • Ability to compute trigonometric functions of simple angles
    • Ability to use the Pythagorean Theorem
    • Ability to solve triangle using the Law of Sines or the Law of Cosines
  • Knowledge of addition formula for sine and cosine
Mathematics XB1A—Calculus (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XMATH
Examples of Intended Majors: 
Physical Sciences, Engineering, Mathematics, Computer Sciences, Molecular and Cell Biology, Economics, Astronomy, Chemistry, Geology, Statistics
Prerequisite: 

Three-and-a-half years of high school mathematics, including trigonometry and analytic geometry, plus a satisfactory grade in one of the following: CEEB MAT test, an AP test, the UC/CSU math diagnostic test or Math 32. It is strongly recommended that you take 1A only if you have already completed precalculus.

Satisfies: 
Quantitative Reasoning requirement if completed with a grade of C− or better. Some majors have specific grade requirements. Students will not receive credit for 1A after taking 16B and 2 units after taking 16A. Math 1A is required to continue on to Math 53 or 54 and are prerequisites for physical science, computer science and math majors. Life science majors also accept this series.
Course Description: 

Math 1A covers the topics of calculus of one variable, mainly with derivatives, and applications such as graphing and optimization. It introduces the idea of integration and applications such as volumes of revolution. Students are expected to understand some theorems and their proofs. This rigorous course emphasizes conceptual understanding and is intended for students in engineering and physical sciences. Three hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per week.

Topics Covered: 
Intuitive and precise limit definitions, continuity, definition of the derivative, shortcut rules for finding derivatives, product rule, quotient rule, chain rule, implicit differentiation, related rates, linear approximations and differentials, mean value theorem, L'Hopital's rule, curve sketching, optimization, Newton's Method, definition of Riemann integral, Fundamental Theorem of Calculus (Parts 1 and 2), natural logarithm defined as an integral, area between two curves, volumes of solids of revolution.
Skills Needed: 
  • Facility with a scientific calculator or graphing calculator may be required
    • Ability to determine the value of a complicated expression using a scientific or graphing calculator
  • Facility with fractions
    • Ability to simplify rational expressions and solve rational equations
  • Facility with algebra
    • Ability to solve linear equations
    • Ability to solve quadratic equations by factoring, completing the square and using the quadratic formula
    • Ability to solve a linear system of equations
  • Facility with graphing
    • Ability to identify and plot points on the Cartesian plane
    • Ability to graph lines
  • Facility with exponential and logarithmic functions
    • Familiarity with e and natural logarithms
    • Ability to simplify expressions containing logarithms
    • Ability to solve logarithmic equations
      • Ability to graph exponential and logarithmic functions
  • Facility with trigonometry
    • Familiarity with radian measure
    • Ability to compute trigonometric functions of simple angles
    • Ability to use the Pythagorean Theorem
    • Ability to solve triangle using the Law of Sines or the Law of Cosines
    • Knowledge of addition formula for sine and cosine
Mathematics XB1B—Calculus (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XMATH
Examples of Intended Majors: 
Physical Sciences, Engineering, Mathematics, Computer Sciences, Molecular and Cell Biology, Economics, Astronomy, Chemistry, Geology, Statistics
Prerequisite: 

Math 1A or equivalent coursework; please check Assist.org or with the Office of Undergraduate Admissions to make sure your coursework is equivalent to UC Berkeley's Math 1A.

Satisfies: 
Quantitative Reasoning requirement if completed with a grade of C− or better. Some majors have specific grade requirements. Students taking 1B after 16B receive only 2 units for 1B. Math 1B is required to continue on to Math 53 or 54 and are prerequisites for physical science, computer science and math majors. Life science majors also accept this series.
Course Description: 

Math 1B is a continuation of Math 1A. It involves integration techniques and applications and introduces infinite series and first- and second-order differential equations and their uses. It is intended for students with majors in engineering, math and some sciences. Three hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per week.

Topics Covered: 
Integration by parts; trigonometric integrals; trigonometric substitution; partial fractions; midpoint, trapezoid and Simpson’s rules; improper integrals; arc length; area of a surface of revolution; sequences and series; integral test; comparison tests; alternating series; ratio test; root test; power series; Taylor series; binomial series; modeling with differential equations; direction fields; Euler’s method; separable equations; exponential growth and decay; logistic equation; linear differential equations; homogeneous and nonhomogeneous second-order linear differential equations and their applications; series solutions for second-order differential equations.
Skills Needed: 
  • Facility with a scientific calculator or graphing calculator may be required
    • Ability to determine the value of a complicated expression using a scientific or graphing calculator
  • Facility with fractions
    • Ability to simplify rational expressions and solve rational equations
  • Facility with algebra
    • Ability to solve linear equations
    • Ability to solve quadratic equations by factoring, completing the square and using the quadratic formula
    • Ability to solve a linear system of equations
  • Facility with graphing
    • Ability to identify and plot points on the Cartesian plane
    • Ability to graph lines
  • Facility with exponential and logarithmic functions
    • Familiarity with e and natural logarithms
    • Ability to simplify expressions containing logarithms
    • Ability to solve logarithmic equations
    • Ability to graph exponential and logarithmic functions
  • Facility with trigonometry
    • Familiarity with radian measure
    • Ability to compute trigonometric functions of simple angles
    • Ability to use the Pythagorean Theorem
    • Ability to solve triangle using the Law of Sines or the Law of Cosines
    • Knowledge of addition formula for sine and cosine
  • Facility with differentiation
    • Knowledge that a derivative can be interpreted as a rate of change or the slope of a tangent line
    • Ability to compute the derivative of elementary functions
    • Ability to use the product, quotient and chain rules
    • Ability to differentiate implicitly
  • Facility with integration
    • Ability to compute volumes of solids of revolution
    • Ability to integrate using u-substitution
Statistics XB2—Introduction to Statistics (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XSTAT
Examples of Intended Majors: 
Psychology, Political Economy, Development Studies, Legal Studies, Nutritional Science: Dietetics, Nutritional Science: Physiology and Metabolism
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Quantitative Reasoning requirement if completed with a grade of C− or better. Some majors have specific grade requirements. Statistics 2 fulfills prerequisites for some social science majors, such as psychology. It does not fulfill prerequisites for the economics major, statistics major or the Haas Undergraduate Business Program.
Course Description: 

This course introduces basic concepts of probability and statistical inference and covers standard methods for making inferences about populations from information contained in sample data: the methods used in sample surveys, opinion polls, research studies and industry. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Topics Covered: 
Populations, statistics, variables, observational studies versus experiments, graphs of data, descriptive measures of location and spread, normal approximation, correlation, the regression line, Simpson’s paradox, probability, binomial and normal distributions, and the behavior of the average of samples, as well as inference methods such as estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis tests for averages and percentages, and the chi-square test.
Skills Needed: 
  • Facility with a scientific calculator or graphing calculator may be required
    • Ability to determine the value of a complicated expression using a scientific or graphing calculator
  • Facility with fractions
    • Ability to simplify rational expressions and solve rational equations
  • Facility with algebra
    • Ability to solve linear equations
    • Ability to solve quadratic equations by factoring, completing the square and using the quadratic formula
    • Ability to solve a linear system of equations
  • Facility with graphing
    • Ability to identify and plot points on the Cartesian plane
    • Ability to graph lines

Reading and Composition

You may have already fulfilled the L&S R&C requirement, though most freshmen have not. You should complete the R&C requirement by the end of your freshman year or, at the latest, by the end of your sophomore year.

Reading and Composition R1A

English XBR1A—Reading and Composition: Berkeley Campus (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XENGLIS
Prerequisite: 

Completion of the UC Entry-level Writing Requirement

Satisfies: 
The first-half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement
Course Description: 

Get further instruction in expository writing and focus on the recursive nature of writing and reading. You develop practical fluency in writing longer expositions and gain experience in including research results into papers. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections 
English R1A-1 (Section Cancelled)
 
English R1A-2
21st Century America as Seen through its Celebrated Writers

Instructor: Gilbert, R.

How do we structure our stories and essays these days, what are they about, how do we use language? What do we watch in our theaters? Who do we educated Americans think we are?


English R1A-4
Ambition

Instructor: Miller

Who are you, and what are your dreams and ambitions? Do your aspirations line up with your passions and talents? What gets in the way of achieving goals you set? Do you face hidden obstacles? This course will help us address these and other questions by concentrating on a set of skills crucial to college success: thinking for yourself, making yourself clear when you write, and speaking up in the public spaces of the classroom. To help you get to know yourself and your ambitions better, we will read, discuss, and write about essays, poems, short stories and a novel that address ambition in a number of ways. Encountering these narratives will inspire you to identify your aspirations for college and for life, and to understand what might be getting in the way of reaching them. In the process, you will learn how you can set yourself up for success as college writers.

 

English R1A-6
Solitude, Attention and the Struggle to Be

Instructor: O'Brien

Why is Hamlet's famous question among the most universally familiar and quoted lines of literature? One of Shakespeare's most performed plays, Hamlet remains an enigma to most viewers, as the main character's motives, words, and acts puzzle the mind--at least the surface mind--and leave us in doubt as to why an apparently angry, grief stricken, and often confused protagonist remains a box office draw over centuries. In this section of English 1B we will practice basic skills in reading a few classic texts that explore major issues (such as that Hamlet confronts), begin to learn how to broaden and deepen our reading with the aid of other key texts, and explore the application of this research to concerns that occupy us all as individuals and as members of local and global communities, including those of the past, present, and future.

English R1A-11, R1A-12
Identity as Performance

Instructor: Ghosh

“All the world’s a stage, And all the men and women merely players.”  --As You Like It, Act II Sc. VII  We often hear people say that actions speak louder than words. We express our identities, who we are, through our actions, our performances, our lived experiences amidst the context and structures within which we operate. We connect with our immediate socio-political circumstances, and these relations, in turn, determine our performances of our identities. Personal identity is thus not a concrete unchangeable idea, but its performance is constantly in flux depending on the context. This will be a reading- and writing-intensive course where we will examine short stories, poems, novels, plays, and films focusing on the construction of identity through performance.  This course fulfills the first half of the UC Reading & Composition requirement; together with our critical inquiry into modes of reading, we will practice our writing skills. We will devote plenty of time to critical thinking and essay-writing skills, paying particular attention to argumentation, analysis, and the fundamentals of writing at the college level.


English R1A-20, R1A-21
Gender and Identity

Instructor: Correa

In this course, we will investigate the impact that gender has on identity. What does it mean to be a man? What does it mean to be a woman? How have gender constraints changed over the years? Using a variety of primary sources—short stories, essays, poems, novels and a play we will consider the shifting boundaries of gender roles over time and across cultures.


English R1A-22
"Forget it Jake, it's Chinatown": Chinatown and the Culture of Exclusion

Instructor: Lee

Taking Chinatown as a case study, this course will explore the ideological investments that underscore literary and filmic representations of racialized urban spaces. On the one hand, we will consider the formal strategies used to construct the geography of Chinatown and on the other, how Chinatown is deployed as a key site for popular imaginations about urban crime, poverty, race, and sexuality.  We will examine the ways in which literary and cultural representations constitute and negotiate race, class, and sexual boundaries in the American city, and their broader implications for questions of national identity and citizenship.  How does Chinatown narrate the story of American exclusion?  In addition to thinking about Chinatown as an ethnic enclave, we will also consider Chinatown as a global space taking into account its reconfigurations under the impact of cultural and capitalist globalization.  We will consider Chinatown as an urban aesthetic, in part by paying attention to figures such as the FOB, gangster, and hipster and the ways in which they have variously laid claim on Chinatown.  Finally, Chinatown is a political space; by studying the protests and social movements that sprang out of Chinatown, we will look at how Chinatown has changed not only America’s social and cultural landscapes but also American politics. This course will develop your critical thinking, close-reading, and composition skills through in-class discussions and exercises. Students will begin by writing short essays in response to the readings, which we will develop into progressively longer essays throughout the semester. Through a series of in-class workshops, we will discuss student drafts and suggestions for revisions.

English R1A-23
Explorers, Monsters, and Magicians

Instructor: TBA

In this course, we will read and write about characters who go on physical journeys that parallel their mental search to affirm who they are and where they belong. We'll explore how classic and contemporary works illuminate diverse answers to the following questions: What powers, burdens, or risks go with defining oneself (or being defined as) an explorer, a hero, a scholar-magician, an outsider, or even a monster? How responsible are we for the dreams and inventions we create? What does it mean to leave or find a home? How far should one person go to fight for his or her reputation, name, or honor? What are the connections between art and life? Between language and power?

 
College Writing XBR1A—Accelerated Reading and Composition: Berkeley Campus (6 units)
Enroll: 
first-half of R&C and ELWR
Department Abbreviation: 
XCOLWRI
Prerequisite: 

Only for students who have not passed the UC Analytical Writing Placement Exam or have not satisfied the Entry-Level Writing requirement. 

Satisfies: 
Both the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement and the first-half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

This is an intensive and accelerated composition course. Readings include imaginative, expository and argumentative texts representing the range of those encountered in the undergraduate curriculum. Read from authors with diverse social and cultural backgrounds and perspectives. Instruction covers many types of writing and revising papers. Six hours of class per week.

Sections 
College Writing R1A-1
Topic: TBA

Instructor: TBA

 

College Writing R1A-2, R1A-4
The Iceberg of Culture

Instructor: TBA

With the rise of neo-nationalism, as seen in Brexit and in America’s 2016 election, cross-cultural understanding is more important than ever. Plus, it’s fascinating! We’ll explore Geert Hofstede’s Model of Cultures (developed from IBM employee surveys) and recent responses to it by Brendan McSweeney and others. We’ll look at the Culture Compass smart phone app and ask what Hofstede’s Cultural Dimensions Theory can teach us about cultures that differ from our own. We’ll read amazing fiction that can help us “overcome identity politics,” as novelist Elif Shafak observes, and we’ll watch TED talks and riveting documentaries that can help us see where our own cultural biases lie. In short, we’ll expand our worlds as we write excellent papers, too.

College Writing R1A-3
Witness and Testimony

Instructor: Spanbock

 

Understanding subjectivity is an essential part of the writing process. When we express ourselves, make an argument, or tell a story, we do so from a position shaped by who we are and where we are, our background and experiences, our thoughts and beliefs, and even how we are feeling in that moment. Subjectivity also plays a foundational role in how we understand and interpret others and the world around us. It shapes our opinions and makes us unique. This class asks students to consider subjectivity through two distinct but related paradigms: witnessing, an act of seeing or otherwise experiencing an event, and testimony, an act of self-expression meant to share or convey opinions on what has been witnessed. The purpose of this class is to introduce practical methods for reading “texts” (print, visual, auditory, social, etc.) and to activate both thought and writing processes to engage with the dynamic issues they raise. Together, we will examine a number of short and long texts that draw from and speak to discourses from across the academic disciplines and raise questions concerning subjectivity in acts of witness and testimony.  We will also explore different techniques for self-expression and different types of writing with a goal of better understanding our own subject positions, as well as those we encounter. Operating under the premise that our community stands to benefit from a diversity of perspectives and opinions, this class will have a specific emphasis on LOCAL instances of witness and testimony in and around the Bay Area.

 

 

 

Rhetoric XBR1A—The Craft of Writing: Berkeley Campus (4 units)
Enroll: 
first-half of R&C
Department Abbreviation: 
XRHETOR
Prerequisite: 

Completion of the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement or UC Analytical Writing Placement Exam

Satisfies: 
The first-half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

Learn the principles of argumentative writing and emphasizes close readings of texts that reveal their rhetorical structure and intended audience. You learn to identify and interpret a text's thesis and intention and make compelling arguments for your position using textual evidence. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections
Rhetoric R1A-1
Is Science More Persuasive than your Grandmother?

Instructor: Tick

 

Does evidence or logic "speak for itself"?  Are polls more persuasive than politicians?  What is evidence?  Is data "truth"?  Is video of a police action different from an NBA replay? Plato, politics, religion, fiction, the ethics of New Media and Big Data; rhetoric connects these topics.  Using basic rhetorical theory as a flexible, critical tool, we'll consider evidence, social and psychological factors of persuasion, how arguments are constructed, and the role of audience/user in design.  And, absolutely, we'll look at real-time political rhetoric. Rhetoric invites you to think strategically, critically, and be responsible for what you create, especially in writing.  In this class, we will focus on   what you want to accomplish when you communicate, and how to design persuasive presentations to be effective.


Rhetoric R1A-2
Archaeological Readers: Rhetorically Excavating Issues through Close Reading, Critical Thinking, Argumentative Writing 

Instructor: Borst-Rothe

 

Most incoming students are not prepared for the expected level of critical thinking writing, and speaking--skills important at the university and in professional settings. This course will focus on the Rhetorical Framework: identifying critical issues in different disciplines, analyzing style and structure in different arguments, and learning to argue logically and persuasively about authorial intention using textual evidence. Two units focus on the importance of California: one related to the rhetoric of place as a California dream, the other illustrating California's importance in the arts for visual artists, writers, film makers, and photographers. Just as important are units focusing on critical contemporary issues ranging from issues in healthcare to mass incarceration. You'll also have a change to explore the museums (SFMOMA or Berkeley's BAMPFA) as an experiential option in the Art Unit. All writing assignments will focus on modern-day application of classical rhetorical structure, applicable to any field of study, just as brief presentations will help you practice professional speaking. And class discussion, small group work, as well as seminar-style participation will open up the value, the excitement of translating your ideas into clear persuasive arguments, not mere opinions, that you as the next generation of leaders will need. I look forward to taking this archaeological journey with you!

 

Film XBR1A—The Craft of Writing—Film Focus (4 units)
Enroll: 
first-half of R&C
Department Abbreviation: 
XFILM
Prerequisite: 

Completion of the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement

Satisfies: 
The first-half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition Requirement
Course Description: 

Gain a rhetorical approach to reading and writing argumentative discourse with a film focus. Close reading of selected texts; written themes developed from class discussion and analysis of rhetorical strategies. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections 
Film R1A-1
Screening Nature: Figuring "the Natural" in American Cinema 

Instructor: Carpenter

 

These days, one sees “green” messages everywhere one looks: in advertisements for “natural” food products and fuel-efficient automobiles, businesses’ and broadcast networks’ endorsements of earth-friendly practices, and apocalyptic visions on both big and small screens. In radio, television, and film, on the internet, in print culture and in social networks, environmentalist rhetoric exhorts us to behave a certain way toward the world we inhabit. Because we might think that these images and actions are generally a good thing, we might not think twice about them. And yet, each of these messages makes an argument that relies on assumptions about what nature is, what it means to be human, and how humans, natures, and technologies should interact. Whether we realize it or not, these assumptions structure our ways of thinking and set the course of our actions. This course examines how visual culture does such a thing by pointedly interrogating the way that "nature" figures in the American cinema. By studying the history of the concept of nature in America, and how it has shown up in films across genres -- even where we don't expect it -- we will work toward a new definition of what nature means for us. Moreover, as we discover how nature works as an idea and an image in the texts that surround us, you will emerge able to identify how nature reflects a variety of historically specific notions of race, gender, and nation.

Film R1A-2
"You know you're dealing with the Yakuza, right?": The Gangster across World Cinema

Instructor: TBA

 

The gangster on the big screen is "what we want to be and what we are afraid we might become." So argues critic Robert Warshow in his 1954 essay on “The Gangster as Tragic Hero,” and so starts our investigation into these appealing monsters that capitalism has given us. This course is invested in exploring the historical roots of these violent and doomed heroes whose rise and falls so entrance us. We’ll track the birth of a figure driven by destructive wants, the id of depression era America. Then, like the rapidity of a Tommy gun's blast, our study will quickly expand our course's lens across time and national cinemas, from the gangs of London and the French banlieue to the Chinese Triads and Japanese Yakuza to the new waves of mobsters of the 21st Century. Our cinematic immersion will be driven by a set of questions: what thematic and formal elements remain constant in portrayals of the gangster? In what ways do filmmakers employ the archetypical figure to craft nuanced socio-political critiques of institutional corruption in their respective cultures? What does the gangster, inexorably tied to the city, expose about the viewer's own corrosive appetites and to paraphrase Warshow, what are we afraid of becoming if we were to give in to them? For no matter what else the gangster film may entail, it is always about the alluring but destructive energy of a capitalism that constantly promises us the world even as it threatens to destroy it.

 

Comparative Literature XBR1A—English Composition in Connection With the Reading of World Literature (4 units)
Enroll: 
first-half of R&C
Department Abbreviation: 
TBD
Prerequisite: 

Completion of the UC Entry Level Writing Requirement or UC Analytical Writing Placement Exam

Satisfies: 
The first-half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better.
Course Description: 

Gain instruction in expository writing based on analysis of selected masterpieces of ancient and modern literature. You will come to understand the readings through class discussion and writing and revising papers that analyze the readings in academic argument form. Learn to read and write at the analytical and critical levels required at the University of California. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections
Comparative Literature R1A-1
Lost & Found in the American City 

Instructor: Palau

 

A Mexico City writer who wonders whether individuality dissolves in his overcrowded, “post-apocalyptic city.” A poet who imagines the possibilities of a booming metropolis while riding a ferry between Manhattan and Brooklyn. A nineteenth-century intellectual for whom the rise of urban centers in Argentina represents hope for civility, order, and national prosperity. Photojournalists who wander Mexico’s capital with their cameras, capturing both the minute details and big stories of everyday city life. No matter how different, all these people produce and practice the city in some way: they write, they wander, they take photographs and ponder what their cities are and might become, all the while navigating urban space and exploring the complexities of finding and losing histories, objects, and selves within it. But who—and what—gets lost and found in the American city? As cultural, political, and economic centers, can cities foster connection, creativity, and belonging? What gets lost—or pushed into possible oblivion—in and by the city? With these questions in mind, we’ll spend the semester exploring the imagined landscapes of four of America’s most iconic cities—New York, Mexico City, Buenos Aires, and Los Angeles. Along the way, we’ll consider some of the ways in which urban spaces are experienced, constructed, explored, and imagined as spaces where some get lost, others found.

Reading and Composition R1B

English XBR1B—Reading and Composition: Berkeley Campus (4 units)
Enroll: 
second-half of R&C
Department Abbreviation: 
XENGLIS
Prerequisite: 

Completion of both the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement and the first-half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement

Satisfies: 
The second-half (R1B portion) of the reading and composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

Get further instruction in argumentative writing and focus on intensive argumentative writing drawn from controversy stimulated through selected readings and class discussion. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections 
English R1B-1, English R1B-2
Life-on-the Hyphen

Instructor: Nanda

 

Some were brought here, while some came here to the Americas. A fascinating short quote from Walt Whitman begins our course—“I turn but do not extricate myself,/ Confused, a past-reading, another,/ but with darkness yet”— for in a way we are all aliens in this land of aliens asking ourselves who are we, what are we trying to achieve and how may we achieve it? This course is about life in the Americas. It’s about life that beckons, it’s about a life that promises, it’s about a life that often fails—it’s about your life-on-the-hyphen. We read a variety of texts by Toni Morrison,  Kiran Desai and Chang-rae Lee to better understand the complexities and nuances of navigating our own lives on the hyphen.  Basic rhetorical tools such as description, analysis, explanation, narration, speculation and argument will be used to share your experiences, information and views with others. The emphasis will be on provocative theses, strategies of argument and competent analysis of evidence. It will also introduce you to research techniques that would involve evaluation and synthesis of primary and secondary source material into your argument.


English R1B-3, R1B-5
Dystopian Fictions

Instructor: Hollis

 

Dystopian and post-apocalyptic fiction depicts worlds that reflect the worst elements of our own. Often used as a mirror held up to contemporary culture, dystopian fictions may comment on science, technology, and environmental issues developing in our own world. They may also reflect concerns we have with inequality, identity, and political power. Classic dystopian texts include George Orwell’s 1984 and Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World; popular contemporary dystopian texts include books and films like The Hunger Games and Divergent. Although this course will not assign any of those last texts mentioned, we may very well refer to them. The readings for this course will include both obvious and perhaps not-so-obvious works of dystopia.

English R1B-4 
A Journey Through the Epoch

Instructor: Tipton

 

What ties the course together is not a single theme (though different themes--including freedom and engagement; creation and responsibility; the nature of the ideal marriage; the journey and self-discovery--form linking threads throughout the course), but rather the idea of a chronological trip through time. Through literature, we will travel from the Classical to the Medieval Period, up to the Renaissance and then the Romantic Period, to the Modern, and then finally the Postmodern Period.


English R1B-6
Home and Belonging in a Troubled World

Instructor: Fuchs

 

The theme for this class will be the longing for home and belonging in a troubled world. Characters in many of the works on our list (including two films as well as fiction and non-fiction pieces)  have suffered displacement; they range from aboriginal children in Australia abducted from their families by white authorities to migrants fleeing war or poverty, buoyed by hope and resilience. We will explore the tensions that many newcomers (and their children) experience between assimilation to a foreign culture and fidelity to their own traditions. We will look at representations of a variety of spaces that house people, in some cases by force (including prisons and internment camps), analyzing the conditions which are essential for protagonists to feel whole and "at home" within themselves and their world.


English R1B-7, English R1B-8
Tales and Their Tellers: Storytelling in Fiction and Nonfiction

Instructor: Colopy

 

Humans love stories.  We seem to need them almost as much as we need food, especially when we’re growing up. There are many ways of telling a story; the readings selected for this class represent some of them, ranging from journalism and realism to fantasy.  Looking mostly at contemporary works of fiction we will try to understand—through discussion and writing assignments—what we gain from stories, how we as readers establish a relationship with their narrators, and how that contributes to our understanding of the ideas and realities the authors aim to explore. We will also consider why it is we even like stories that may make us uncomfortable.

History of Art XBR1B—Reading and Writing About Visual Experience (4 units)
Enroll: 
second-half of R&C
Department Abbreviation: 
History of Art XBR1B—Reading and Writing About Visual Experience (4 units)
Prerequisite: 

Completion of both the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement and the first-half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement

Satisfies: 
The second-half (R1B portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

How do mechanisms of perception structure responses to visual art? What is at stake when words describe images? By means of intensive looking, thinking, speaking and writing, this course introduces you to a series of problems and issues in the description and analysis of works of art. Because this course is also an introduction to the historical study of art, it is intended for students with no previous course work in the field. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections 
History of Art R1B-1
From Parchment to Paper: Manuscripts, Prints and Drawings in Early Modern Europe

Instructor: Regan

 

This course examines some of the most important works of art in Renaissance Europe: images in books and on paper. We will look at illuminated manuscripts – that is, painted books – as well as prints, early printed books and drawings, to think about how people in the Renaissance used images in their daily lives. From such pictures, people learned and formed beliefs about everything from miraculous events to social values to the discovery of the New World. In addition to talking about how art of the time explored themes like ethnicity, religion and gender, we'll look at drawings by some of the greatest Renaissance masters – including Leonardo, Michelangelo and Raphael. Visits to the Berkeley Art Museum and the Bancroft Library will let us write about works of art we see in person, and a final research paper lets students choose topics to explore in depth.

Legal Studies XBR1B—Reading and Composition in Connection With the Law as a Social Institution (4 units)
Enroll: 
second-half of R&C
Department Abbreviation: 
XLEGALS
Prerequisite: 

Completion of both the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement and the first-half (R1A portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement.

Satisfies: 
The second-half (R1B portion) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

Develop your skills in critical reading, writing and analysis, and complete a series of essays culminating in a research paper relating to law, legal actors and legal institutions. Emphasis is placed on the process of writing, including developing research questions, constructing an argument and revising for content and style. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections (Themes and titles below from Fall 2016)
Legal Studies R1B-1
Law, Religion, and Culture

Instructor: TBA

 

Course Description: In this reading and composition seminar, we will examine historical and contemporary examples of the law’s regulation of religion in order to think critically about the values of freedom, liberty, and equality in democratic societies. We will bring a range of classic texts on religion (such as John Locke’s A Letter Concerning Toleration and Karl Marx’s On the Jewish Question) to bear on watershed legal cases (on such issues as polygamy, religious dress in the workplace, the consumption of spiritual hallucinogens, and faith-based objections to reproductive healthcare). In doing so, we will also examine how the democratic tensions in these texts are made manifest in modern culture by interpreting street art, ethnographic accounts of spiritually-driven lives, and popular media. Some of the questions we will explore include: What “counts” as religion in the eyes of the law? How has the relationship between religion and the law been historically understood in the democratic liberal state, and how do these historical understandings account for (or refute the possibility of) religious difference? How might contemporary socio-cultural developments – like the recent refusal of some Southern Baptists to serve same-sex couples – help us to uncover what assumptions the law makes about the “proper” practice of religion? Can religious freedom and individual liberty ever truly coexist in a democratic state? Fundamentally, this course attends to how the law has served to shape both religious practices and normative values. As a result, students will emerge from this course with a nuanced understanding of how law, religion, and culture are not separate entities, but rather generative of one another.