Course Offerings

A dozen students talking and laughing in their small classroom The Fall Program for Freshmen offers core courses that prepare our students for success in their L&S Degree Requirements, University requirements, major prerequisites, and electives. Our class sizes range from 14 to 96 seats, and 80% of our classes have fewer than 50 students. Many of these same courses are taught in 300 to 1,000-person lectures on the main campus! 

FPF students are required to take at least three core classes within the FPF course offerings during their first semester (a "core class" is a course for which you earn 3 or more units).  All FPF courses appear with an X prefix. Exclusive to Fall 2021, FPF students are welcome to take one main campus class of 3 units or above (a "main campus" class is one with no X listing that is hosted by a program or department outside of FPF) in addition to your FPF courses.  FPF students may additionally enroll in any main campus electives of 2 units or less. 

The central question we'd like all FPF students to consider during Fall 2021 is "Are we moving toward a world that achieves fundamental fairness and equality for all?" In FPF classes, students will explore intellectual themes like Citizenship, Social Justice, and California across different disciplines.  

All classes are available on the Berkeley Academic Guide in late Spring. 

Department: 
Arts and Literature
Historical Studies
Philosophy and Values
Department Abbreviation: 
XAGRS 10A
Prerequisite: 

None; however, this is a writing- and reading-intensive course, and your writing skills should exceed the College Writing course level

Satisfies: 
Either the Arts and Literature, Historical Studies, or Philosophy and Values breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Study of the major developments, achievements, and contradictions in Greek culture from the Bronze Age to the 4th century BCE. Key works of literature, history, and philosophy (read in English translation) will be examined in their political and social context, and in relation both to other ancient Mediterranean cultures and to subsequent developments in Western civilization.

Department: 
Biological Science
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XANTHRO 1
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Either the Biological Science or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

An introductory course providing a comprehensive introduction to the field of Biological Anthropology.  It is a study of the processes and products of human evolution.  Topics we will cover include evolutionary history and theory, systematics, genetics, primate behavior and ecology, comparative primate anatomy, the primate fossil record with emphasis on the human lineage, human variation and adaptation, the origins of culture, and human biocultural evolution.

Department Abbreviation: 
XCOLWRI R1A
Prerequisite: 

Only for students who have not passed the UC Analytical Writing Placement Exam or have not satisfied the Entry-Level Writing requirement. 

Satisfies: 
Both the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement and the first-half (Part A) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

An intensive, accelerated course satisfying concurrently the requirements of the UC Entry Level Writing Requirement and the first half of Reading and Composition. Readings will include imaginative, expository and argumentative texts representative of the range of those encountered in the undergraduate curriculum and will feature authors from diverse social and cultural backgrounds and perspectives. Instruction in writing a range of discourse forms and in the revision of papers.

Fall 2021 Sections 
College Writing R1A—Section 3
There and Back Again (FPF Thread: California)

We will use personal experience and our fiction and nonfiction readings about the Bay Area to question the role of setting and place in our lives. We will read authors of many different perspectives in order to establish our own confident academic voices, and we will value the process of writing alongside its products.

College Writing R1A—Section 4
Decentralized Identity and the Reimagination of Citizenship (FPF Thread: Citizenship)

This course will seek to reimagine citizenship at the state, national, and global scales by examining our understanding of the concept in the context of the decentralized identities made possible by modern communications technologies.

 
Department Abbreviation: 
XCOMLIT R1A
Prerequisite: 

Completion of the UC Entry Level Writing Requirement or UC Analytical Writing Placement Exam

Satisfies: 
The first-half (Part A) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better.
Course Description: 

Expository writing based on analysis of selected masterpieces of ancient and modern literature. You will come to understand the readings through class discussion and writing and revising papers that analyze the readings in academic argument form. Learn to read and write at the analytical and critical levels required at Berkeley.

Fall 2021 Sections
Comparative Literature R1A—Section 1
Lost and Found in the American City 

As cultural, political, and economic centers, cities can foster connection, creativity, and belonging. What is lost or pushed into possible oblivion in and by the city? We’ll explore the landscapes of four of America’s most iconic cities—New York, Mexico City, Buenos Aires, and Los Angeles—and consider the ways in which urban spaces are experienced, constructed, and imagined as spaces where some get lost, others found.

 
Department Abbreviation: 
XENGLIS R1A
Prerequisite: 

Completion of the UC Entry-level Writing Requirement

Satisfies: 
The first-half (Part A) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better.
Course Description: 

Training in writing expository prose. Instruction in expository writing in conjunction with reading literature.

Fall 2021 Sections

English R1A—Section 3
Exploring Social Justice through Literature (FPF Thread: Social Justice)

This will be a reading- and writing-intensive course where we will read four literary texts to examine how literature can be a vehicle for social justice. How are ideas of justice influenced by specific historical moments? What visions of a just life does literature provide? How might the different emotions that literature evokes in its readers help to promote social justice?

English R1A—Section 9, Section 10
California (FPF Thread: California)

In this class, we’ll look at texts and visual images about the state we call home, by artists who live(d)here and who have thought about what makes California rich, varied, troubling, and wonderful. We’ll ask what unites these texts, what stamps them as Californian. A look at visual arts will enrich your understanding of what it means to work, and create, in a Californian mood. Theodore Roosevelt once said “when I am in California, I am west of the west.” Let’s see what he meant!

English R1A—Section 1
Race and Racism in American Culture

Reflecting on W.E.B Dubois’s proclamation in 1903 that “the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line,” this class will examine how the fictions of race and experiences of racism continue to shape American culture in the 21st century.

Department Abbreviation: 
XENGLIS R1B
Prerequisite: 

Completion of both the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement and the first-half (Part A) of the Reading and Composition requirement

Satisfies: 
The second-half (Part B) of the reading and composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

Training in writing expository prose. Further instruction in expository writing in conjunction with reading literature.

Fall 2021 Sections
English R1B—Section 1
Life on the Hyphen (FPF themes: Citizenship and Social Justice)

In this course, we read texts by Toni Morrison, Kiran Desai and Chang-rae Lee to better understand the complexities of life in the Americas as we balance our lives on the hyphen as “-American.” This course develops your critical thinking and writing skills along with research techniques.

English R1B—Section 2, Section 3
Dystopia, Utopia, or Reality? (FPF themes: Citizenship and Social Justice)

If utopia describes an ideal society or a “good place,” then dystopia describes its opposite: an unjust and cruel society, a bad place, or an apocalyptic world. What can literature teach us about utopian and dystopian elements in our own worlds?

Department: 
Biological Science
Physical Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XESPM 15
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Either the Biological Sciences or Physical Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Introduction to the science underlying biological and physical environmental problems, including water and air quality, global change, energy, ecosystem services, introduced and endangered species, water supply, solid waste, human population, and interaction of technical, social, and political approaches to environmental management.

Department: 
Historical Studies
Philosophy and Values
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XESPM 50AC
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies, Philosophy and Values, or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

An introduction to how culture affects the way we use and manage fire, wildland and urban forests, rangelands, parks and preserves, and croplands in America. The basic concepts and tools for evaluating the role of culture in resource use and management are introduced and used to examine the experience of American cultural groups in the development and management of western natural resources.

Department: 
Arts and Literature
Department Abbreviation: 
XFILM 50
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Arts and Literature breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

This course examines how California has figured in the cinematic imagination as an industrial center and as a landscape of fantasy, site for the formulation and revision of national mythologies regarding the American West. We will assemble a cinematic history of the state –from the founding of the Spanish missions to the 21st century –while asking how filmmakers from D. W. Griffith to P. T. Anderson figure the California landscape as both wasteland and promised land, iconic backdrop for the examination of American national identity and politics, the construction of gender, and narratives of racial and class struggle. Texts will address the history of the state, the history of the film industry therein, and formal, narrative, and ideological analyses of the films that structure the course.

Department Abbreviation: 
XFILM R1B
Prerequisite: 

Completion of both the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement and the first-half (Part A) of the Reading and Composition requirement

Satisfies: 
The second-half (Part B) of the reading and composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

Intensive argumentative writing stimulated through selected readings, films, and class discussion.

Fall 2021 Section
Film R1B - Section 1
Stardom, Spectatorship, and Difference (FPF Thread: Social Justice)

This class interrogates the relationships between stars and their social contexts. What does it mean to present an “image” of oneself? How can that “image” be read onscreen? The class will engage a wide range of critical texts that focus on the history of the “art of personality” with a particular emphasis on the history of film stardom, including how stars circulate in society, how spectators respond to representations of stardom, how forms of social difference inform this spectatorship, and how the phenomenon of stardom has changed from the 19th century to the digital era.

Department: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XGWS 50AC
Prerequisite: 

None.

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and the Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade.
Course Description: 

A multi-disciplinary course designed to provide students with an opportunity to work with faculty investigating the topic gender in American culture.

Class Description: The course problematizes "gendered" identity constructs by analyzing writings by Native American, African American and Indian American women writers. We take into cognizance origin, movement, gender, class, and race as these stories speak of exclusion and exploitation. From there we also examine these stories as they cut across cultures and contexts to give form or transform identity politics.

Department: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XGEOG 50AC
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences, American Cultures
Course Description: 

California had been called "the great exception" and "America, only more so." Yet few of us pay attention to its distinctive traits and to its effects beyond our borders. California may be "a state of mind," but it is also the most dynamic place in the most powerful country in the world, and would be the 8th largest economy if it were a country. Its wealth has been built on mining, agriculture, industry, trade, and finance. Natural abundance and geographic advantage have played their parts, but the state's greatest resource has been its wealth and diversity of people, who have made it a center of technological and cultural innovation from Hollywood to Silicon Valley. Yet California has a dark side of exploitation and racialization.

Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XHISTOR 7B
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade.
Course Description: 

Examine the experiences and conflicts that comprise American society's history. You will be exposed to a wide range of historical actors and dialogues in order to understand the past, from the perspective of the men and women who experienced it and to gain some insight into the daily lives of Americans: work and leisure, cultures and ideologies, relations with one another, and the political and economic system under which they lived. Lectures and readings focus on the complex interplay among political, economic and cultural interests, and will examine, in particular depth, race relations, the laboring classes, reform movements, the interior of American lives, the changing conditions for success and survival in the culture Americans were shaping, and the emerging role of the United States as a world power.

Department: 
Biological Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XINTEGB 33
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Biological Science breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

In this lecture course, focus on dinosaurs from their appearance to extinction. Learn about the dinosaur skeleton, reconstructing dinosaurs, basic principles of evolution, classification and adaptation, and a survey of dinosaur types. You consider dinosaur reproduction, the question of dinosaur endothermy and the origin of birds. You also survey the other animals that coexisted with the dinosaurs to build a picture of the Mesozoic world. Lectures are often illustrated with slides.

Department Abbreviation: 
XMATH 10A
Examples of Intended Majors: 
Integrative Biology, Molecular and Cell Biology, other life sciences
Prerequisite: 

Three and one-half years of high school math, including trigonometry and analytic geometry, plus a satisfactory grade in one of the following: CEEB MAT test, an AP test, the UC/CSU math diagnostic test or Math 32. It is strongly recommended that you take 1A only if you have already completed precalculus.

Satisfies: 
Quantitative Reasoning requirement if completed with a grade of C− or better. Some majors have specific grade requirements. Math 10A is required to continue on to Math 10B.
Course Description: 

Intended for majors in the life sciences. Introduction to differential and integral calculus of functions of one variable, ordinary differential equations, and matrix algebra and systems of linear equations.

Class Description: The first of a two-semester sequence of introductory college-level mathematics, covering topics in calculus, statistics and combinatorics. Primarily intended for life science majors, with many examples and applications from this context. Topics covered include mathematical modeling with functions, differential and integral calculus of functions of one variable, ordinary differential equations, matrix algebra, and systems of linear equations.

Department Abbreviation: 
XMATH 1A
Examples of Intended Majors: 
Physical Sciences, Engineering, Mathematics, Computer Sciences, Molecular and Cell Biology, Economics, Astronomy, Chemistry, Geology, Statistics
Prerequisite: 

Three-and-a-half years of high school mathematics, including trigonometry and analytic geometry, plus a satisfactory grade in one of the following: CEEB MAT test, an AP test, the UC/CSU math diagnostic test or Math 32. It is strongly recommended that you take 1A only if you have already completed precalculus.

Satisfies: 
Quantitative Reasoning requirement if completed with a grade of C− or better. Some majors have specific grade requirements. Math 1A (or equivalent) is required to continue on to Math 1B.
Course Description: 

Math 1A covers the topics of calculus of one variable, mainly with derivatives, and applications such as graphing and optimization. It introduces the idea of integration and applications such as volumes of revolution. Students are expected to understand some theorems and their proofs. This rigorous course emphasizes conceptual understanding and is intended for students in engineering and physical sciences.

Topics Covered: 
Intuitive and precise limit definitions, continuity, definition of the derivative, shortcut rules for finding derivatives, product rule, quotient rule, chain rule, implicit differentiation, related rates, linear approximations and differentials, mean value theorem, L'Hopital's rule, curve sketching, optimization, Newton's Method, definition of Riemann integral, Fundamental Theorem of Calculus (Parts 1 and 2), natural logarithm defined as an integral, area between two curves, volumes of solids of revolution.
Skills Needed: 
  • Facility with a scientific calculator or graphing calculator may be required
    • Ability to determine the value of a complicated expression using a scientific or graphing calculator
  • Facility with fractions
    • Ability to simplify rational expressions and solve rational equations
  • Facility with algebra
    • Ability to solve linear equations
    • Ability to solve quadratic equations by factoring, completing the square and using the quadratic formula
    • Ability to solve a linear system of equations
  • Facility with graphing
    • Ability to identify and plot points on the Cartesian plane
    • Ability to graph lines
  • Facility with exponential and logarithmic functions
    • Familiarity with e and natural logarithms
    • Ability to simplify expressions containing logarithms
    • Ability to solve logarithmic equations
      • Ability to graph exponential and logarithmic functions
  • Facility with trigonometry
    • Familiarity with radian measure
    • Ability to compute trigonometric functions of simple angles
    • Ability to use the Pythagorean Theorem
    • Ability to solve triangle using the Law of Sines or the Law of Cosines
    • Knowledge of addition formula for sine and cosine
Department Abbreviation: 
XMATH 1B
Examples of Intended Majors: 
Physical Sciences, Engineering, Mathematics, Computer Sciences, Molecular and Cell Biology, Economics, Astronomy, Chemistry, Geology, Statistics
Prerequisite: 

Math 1A or equivalent coursework; please check Assist.org or with the Office of Undergraduate Admissions to make sure your coursework is equivalent to UC Berkeley's Math 1A.

Satisfies: 
Quantitative Reasoning requirement if completed with a grade of C− or better. Some majors have specific grade requirements. Math 1B is required to continue on to Math 53 or 54, and is recommended to continue on to Math 55.
Course Description: 

Math 1B is a continuation of Math 1A. It involves integration techniques and applications and introduces infinite series and first- and second-order differential equations and their uses. It is intended for students with majors in engineering, math and some sciences.

Department: 
Philosophy and Values
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XPHILOS 2
Prerequisite: 

None; however, this is a writing- and reading-intensive course, and students' writing skills should exceed the College Writing course level.

Satisfies: 
Either the Philosophy and Values or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Is there anything to be said in a principled way about “right” and “wrong” action? Is there some conception of “the good” that governs how we should conduct our lives and justifies our moral practices? In virtue of what is it possible that we are free to be held accountable for our deeds?

Department: 
International Studies
Department Abbreviation: 
XPOLSCI 2
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Either the International Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

This course aims to furnish students with the tools needed to study politics and society in comparative perspective, by introducing concepts and methods of comparative analysis and examining core assumptions about human nature that underpin social scientists’ thinking. We will investigate the variety of political regimes under which people live around the world, and consider the factors that influence which type of political regime prevails in particular national settings.

Class Description: Who has the right to hold power in society? Is there a “recipe” for economic development? Is democracy inappropriate, or impossible, within some cultural contexts? What can ordinary people do to bring about political change? PS2 will address these questions, giving you an introduction to the dynamics of political and economic development within various countries around the world.

Department: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XPSYCH 1
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

This course allows students to explore the field of psychology. It is designed to provide a historical and structural overview of the field. Upon completion, student will be prepared for future courses, having developed both the skill set and knowledge base that is expected.

Department: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XSOCIOL 3AC
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and the Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Comparing the experience of three out of five ethnic groups (i.e., African Americans, Asian Americans, Chicanos/Latinos, European Americans and Native Americans), you examine historically how each people entered American society and built communities and transformed their cultures in the process. Gain an introduction to the sociological perspective; characteristic methods of research; and key concepts such as culture, community, class, race, social change and social movements. Three hours of lecture per week.

Breadth Courses

The College of Letters and Science Seven-Course Breadth requirement and American Cultures Breadth requirement are the foundation of the college's liberal arts program. It can only be fulfilled with college coursework; AP exams and other high school work do not count toward this requirement.

= Courses that also fulfill the American Cultures requirement

Arts and Literature

Department: 
Arts and Literature
Historical Studies
Philosophy and Values
Department Abbreviation: 
XAGRS 10A
Prerequisite: 

None; however, this is a writing- and reading-intensive course, and your writing skills should exceed the College Writing course level

Satisfies: 
Either the Arts and Literature, Historical Studies, or Philosophy and Values breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Study of the major developments, achievements, and contradictions in Greek culture from the Bronze Age to the 4th century BCE. Key works of literature, history, and philosophy (read in English translation) will be examined in their political and social context, and in relation both to other ancient Mediterranean cultures and to subsequent developments in Western civilization.

Department: 
Arts and Literature
Department Abbreviation: 
XFILM 50
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Arts and Literature breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

This course examines how California has figured in the cinematic imagination as an industrial center and as a landscape of fantasy, site for the formulation and revision of national mythologies regarding the American West. We will assemble a cinematic history of the state –from the founding of the Spanish missions to the 21st century –while asking how filmmakers from D. W. Griffith to P. T. Anderson figure the California landscape as both wasteland and promised land, iconic backdrop for the examination of American national identity and politics, the construction of gender, and narratives of racial and class struggle. Texts will address the history of the state, the history of the film industry therein, and formal, narrative, and ideological analyses of the films that structure the course.

Biological Science

Department: 
Biological Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XINTEGB 33
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Biological Science breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

In this lecture course, focus on dinosaurs from their appearance to extinction. Learn about the dinosaur skeleton, reconstructing dinosaurs, basic principles of evolution, classification and adaptation, and a survey of dinosaur types. You consider dinosaur reproduction, the question of dinosaur endothermy and the origin of birds. You also survey the other animals that coexisted with the dinosaurs to build a picture of the Mesozoic world. Lectures are often illustrated with slides.

Department: 
Biological Science
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XANTHRO 1
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Either the Biological Science or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

An introductory course providing a comprehensive introduction to the field of Biological Anthropology.  It is a study of the processes and products of human evolution.  Topics we will cover include evolutionary history and theory, systematics, genetics, primate behavior and ecology, comparative primate anatomy, the primate fossil record with emphasis on the human lineage, human variation and adaptation, the origins of culture, and human biocultural evolution.

Department: 
Biological Science
Physical Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XESPM 15
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Either the Biological Sciences or Physical Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Introduction to the science underlying biological and physical environmental problems, including water and air quality, global change, energy, ecosystem services, introduced and endangered species, water supply, solid waste, human population, and interaction of technical, social, and political approaches to environmental management.

Historical Studies

Department: 
Arts and Literature
Historical Studies
Philosophy and Values
Department Abbreviation: 
XAGRS 10A
Prerequisite: 

None; however, this is a writing- and reading-intensive course, and your writing skills should exceed the College Writing course level

Satisfies: 
Either the Arts and Literature, Historical Studies, or Philosophy and Values breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Study of the major developments, achievements, and contradictions in Greek culture from the Bronze Age to the 4th century BCE. Key works of literature, history, and philosophy (read in English translation) will be examined in their political and social context, and in relation both to other ancient Mediterranean cultures and to subsequent developments in Western civilization.

Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XHISTOR 7B
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade.
Course Description: 

Examine the experiences and conflicts that comprise American society's history. You will be exposed to a wide range of historical actors and dialogues in order to understand the past, from the perspective of the men and women who experienced it and to gain some insight into the daily lives of Americans: work and leisure, cultures and ideologies, relations with one another, and the political and economic system under which they lived. Lectures and readings focus on the complex interplay among political, economic and cultural interests, and will examine, in particular depth, race relations, the laboring classes, reform movements, the interior of American lives, the changing conditions for success and survival in the culture Americans were shaping, and the emerging role of the United States as a world power.

Department: 
Historical Studies
Philosophy and Values
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XESPM 50AC
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies, Philosophy and Values, or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

An introduction to how culture affects the way we use and manage fire, wildland and urban forests, rangelands, parks and preserves, and croplands in America. The basic concepts and tools for evaluating the role of culture in resource use and management are introduced and used to examine the experience of American cultural groups in the development and management of western natural resources.

International Studies

Department: 
International Studies
Department Abbreviation: 
XPOLSCI 2
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Either the International Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

This course aims to furnish students with the tools needed to study politics and society in comparative perspective, by introducing concepts and methods of comparative analysis and examining core assumptions about human nature that underpin social scientists’ thinking. We will investigate the variety of political regimes under which people live around the world, and consider the factors that influence which type of political regime prevails in particular national settings.

Class Description: Who has the right to hold power in society? Is there a “recipe” for economic development? Is democracy inappropriate, or impossible, within some cultural contexts? What can ordinary people do to bring about political change? PS2 will address these questions, giving you an introduction to the dynamics of political and economic development within various countries around the world.

Philosophy and Values

Department: 
Arts and Literature
Historical Studies
Philosophy and Values
Department Abbreviation: 
XAGRS 10A
Prerequisite: 

None; however, this is a writing- and reading-intensive course, and your writing skills should exceed the College Writing course level

Satisfies: 
Either the Arts and Literature, Historical Studies, or Philosophy and Values breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Study of the major developments, achievements, and contradictions in Greek culture from the Bronze Age to the 4th century BCE. Key works of literature, history, and philosophy (read in English translation) will be examined in their political and social context, and in relation both to other ancient Mediterranean cultures and to subsequent developments in Western civilization.

Department: 
Philosophy and Values
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XPHILOS 2
Prerequisite: 

None; however, this is a writing- and reading-intensive course, and students' writing skills should exceed the College Writing course level.

Satisfies: 
Either the Philosophy and Values or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Is there anything to be said in a principled way about “right” and “wrong” action? Is there some conception of “the good” that governs how we should conduct our lives and justifies our moral practices? In virtue of what is it possible that we are free to be held accountable for our deeds?

Department: 
Historical Studies
Philosophy and Values
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XESPM 50AC
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies, Philosophy and Values, or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

An introduction to how culture affects the way we use and manage fire, wildland and urban forests, rangelands, parks and preserves, and croplands in America. The basic concepts and tools for evaluating the role of culture in resource use and management are introduced and used to examine the experience of American cultural groups in the development and management of western natural resources.

Physical Science

Department: 
Biological Science
Physical Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XESPM 15
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Either the Biological Sciences or Physical Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Introduction to the science underlying biological and physical environmental problems, including water and air quality, global change, energy, ecosystem services, introduced and endangered species, water supply, solid waste, human population, and interaction of technical, social, and political approaches to environmental management.

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Department: 
Philosophy and Values
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XPHILOS 2
Prerequisite: 

None; however, this is a writing- and reading-intensive course, and students' writing skills should exceed the College Writing course level.

Satisfies: 
Either the Philosophy and Values or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Is there anything to be said in a principled way about “right” and “wrong” action? Is there some conception of “the good” that governs how we should conduct our lives and justifies our moral practices? In virtue of what is it possible that we are free to be held accountable for our deeds?

Department: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XPSYCH 1
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

This course allows students to explore the field of psychology. It is designed to provide a historical and structural overview of the field. Upon completion, student will be prepared for future courses, having developed both the skill set and knowledge base that is expected.

Department: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XSOCIOL 3AC
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and the Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Comparing the experience of three out of five ethnic groups (i.e., African Americans, Asian Americans, Chicanos/Latinos, European Americans and Native Americans), you examine historically how each people entered American society and built communities and transformed their cultures in the process. Gain an introduction to the sociological perspective; characteristic methods of research; and key concepts such as culture, community, class, race, social change and social movements. Three hours of lecture per week.

Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XHISTOR 7B
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade.
Course Description: 

Examine the experiences and conflicts that comprise American society's history. You will be exposed to a wide range of historical actors and dialogues in order to understand the past, from the perspective of the men and women who experienced it and to gain some insight into the daily lives of Americans: work and leisure, cultures and ideologies, relations with one another, and the political and economic system under which they lived. Lectures and readings focus on the complex interplay among political, economic and cultural interests, and will examine, in particular depth, race relations, the laboring classes, reform movements, the interior of American lives, the changing conditions for success and survival in the culture Americans were shaping, and the emerging role of the United States as a world power.

Department: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XGEOG 50AC
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences, American Cultures
Course Description: 

California had been called "the great exception" and "America, only more so." Yet few of us pay attention to its distinctive traits and to its effects beyond our borders. California may be "a state of mind," but it is also the most dynamic place in the most powerful country in the world, and would be the 8th largest economy if it were a country. Its wealth has been built on mining, agriculture, industry, trade, and finance. Natural abundance and geographic advantage have played their parts, but the state's greatest resource has been its wealth and diversity of people, who have made it a center of technological and cultural innovation from Hollywood to Silicon Valley. Yet California has a dark side of exploitation and racialization.

Department: 
Biological Science
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XANTHRO 1
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Either the Biological Science or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

An introductory course providing a comprehensive introduction to the field of Biological Anthropology.  It is a study of the processes and products of human evolution.  Topics we will cover include evolutionary history and theory, systematics, genetics, primate behavior and ecology, comparative primate anatomy, the primate fossil record with emphasis on the human lineage, human variation and adaptation, the origins of culture, and human biocultural evolution.

Department: 
Historical Studies
Philosophy and Values
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XESPM 50AC
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies, Philosophy and Values, or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

An introduction to how culture affects the way we use and manage fire, wildland and urban forests, rangelands, parks and preserves, and croplands in America. The basic concepts and tools for evaluating the role of culture in resource use and management are introduced and used to examine the experience of American cultural groups in the development and management of western natural resources.

Department: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XGWS 50AC
Prerequisite: 

None.

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and the Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade.
Course Description: 

A multi-disciplinary course designed to provide students with an opportunity to work with faculty investigating the topic gender in American culture.

Class Description: The course problematizes "gendered" identity constructs by analyzing writings by Native American, African American and Indian American women writers. We take into cognizance origin, movement, gender, class, and race as these stories speak of exclusion and exploitation. From there we also examine these stories as they cut across cultures and contexts to give form or transform identity politics.

Your Math and Statistics Courses

You may have already fulfilled the L&S Quantitative Reasoning requirement, but your intended major(s) may require math courses. 

Department Abbreviation: 
XMATH 1A
Examples of Intended Majors: 
Physical Sciences, Engineering, Mathematics, Computer Sciences, Molecular and Cell Biology, Economics, Astronomy, Chemistry, Geology, Statistics
Prerequisite: 

Three-and-a-half years of high school mathematics, including trigonometry and analytic geometry, plus a satisfactory grade in one of the following: CEEB MAT test, an AP test, the UC/CSU math diagnostic test or Math 32. It is strongly recommended that you take 1A only if you have already completed precalculus.

Satisfies: 
Quantitative Reasoning requirement if completed with a grade of C− or better. Some majors have specific grade requirements. Math 1A (or equivalent) is required to continue on to Math 1B.
Course Description: 

Math 1A covers the topics of calculus of one variable, mainly with derivatives, and applications such as graphing and optimization. It introduces the idea of integration and applications such as volumes of revolution. Students are expected to understand some theorems and their proofs. This rigorous course emphasizes conceptual understanding and is intended for students in engineering and physical sciences.

Topics Covered: 
Intuitive and precise limit definitions, continuity, definition of the derivative, shortcut rules for finding derivatives, product rule, quotient rule, chain rule, implicit differentiation, related rates, linear approximations and differentials, mean value theorem, L'Hopital's rule, curve sketching, optimization, Newton's Method, definition of Riemann integral, Fundamental Theorem of Calculus (Parts 1 and 2), natural logarithm defined as an integral, area between two curves, volumes of solids of revolution.
Skills Needed: 
  • Facility with a scientific calculator or graphing calculator may be required
    • Ability to determine the value of a complicated expression using a scientific or graphing calculator
  • Facility with fractions
    • Ability to simplify rational expressions and solve rational equations
  • Facility with algebra
    • Ability to solve linear equations
    • Ability to solve quadratic equations by factoring, completing the square and using the quadratic formula
    • Ability to solve a linear system of equations
  • Facility with graphing
    • Ability to identify and plot points on the Cartesian plane
    • Ability to graph lines
  • Facility with exponential and logarithmic functions
    • Familiarity with e and natural logarithms
    • Ability to simplify expressions containing logarithms
    • Ability to solve logarithmic equations
      • Ability to graph exponential and logarithmic functions
  • Facility with trigonometry
    • Familiarity with radian measure
    • Ability to compute trigonometric functions of simple angles
    • Ability to use the Pythagorean Theorem
    • Ability to solve triangle using the Law of Sines or the Law of Cosines
    • Knowledge of addition formula for sine and cosine
Department Abbreviation: 
XMATH 1B
Examples of Intended Majors: 
Physical Sciences, Engineering, Mathematics, Computer Sciences, Molecular and Cell Biology, Economics, Astronomy, Chemistry, Geology, Statistics
Prerequisite: 

Math 1A or equivalent coursework; please check Assist.org or with the Office of Undergraduate Admissions to make sure your coursework is equivalent to UC Berkeley's Math 1A.

Satisfies: 
Quantitative Reasoning requirement if completed with a grade of C− or better. Some majors have specific grade requirements. Math 1B is required to continue on to Math 53 or 54, and is recommended to continue on to Math 55.
Course Description: 

Math 1B is a continuation of Math 1A. It involves integration techniques and applications and introduces infinite series and first- and second-order differential equations and their uses. It is intended for students with majors in engineering, math and some sciences.

Department Abbreviation: 
XMATH 10A
Examples of Intended Majors: 
Integrative Biology, Molecular and Cell Biology, other life sciences
Prerequisite: 

Three and one-half years of high school math, including trigonometry and analytic geometry, plus a satisfactory grade in one of the following: CEEB MAT test, an AP test, the UC/CSU math diagnostic test or Math 32. It is strongly recommended that you take 1A only if you have already completed precalculus.

Satisfies: 
Quantitative Reasoning requirement if completed with a grade of C− or better. Some majors have specific grade requirements. Math 10A is required to continue on to Math 10B.
Course Description: 

Intended for majors in the life sciences. Introduction to differential and integral calculus of functions of one variable, ordinary differential equations, and matrix algebra and systems of linear equations.

Class Description: The first of a two-semester sequence of introductory college-level mathematics, covering topics in calculus, statistics and combinatorics. Primarily intended for life science majors, with many examples and applications from this context. Topics covered include mathematical modeling with functions, differential and integral calculus of functions of one variable, ordinary differential equations, matrix algebra, and systems of linear equations.

Reading and Composition

You may have already fulfilled the L&S R&C requirement, though most freshmen have not. You should complete the R&C requirement by the end of your sophomore year.

Reading and Composition Part A

Department Abbreviation: 
XENGLIS R1A
Prerequisite: 

Completion of the UC Entry-level Writing Requirement

Satisfies: 
The first-half (Part A) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better.
Course Description: 

Training in writing expository prose. Instruction in expository writing in conjunction with reading literature.

Fall 2021 Sections

English R1A—Section 3
Exploring Social Justice through Literature (FPF Thread: Social Justice)

This will be a reading- and writing-intensive course where we will read four literary texts to examine how literature can be a vehicle for social justice. How are ideas of justice influenced by specific historical moments? What visions of a just life does literature provide? How might the different emotions that literature evokes in its readers help to promote social justice?

English R1A—Section 9, Section 10
California (FPF Thread: California)

In this class, we’ll look at texts and visual images about the state we call home, by artists who live(d)here and who have thought about what makes California rich, varied, troubling, and wonderful. We’ll ask what unites these texts, what stamps them as Californian. A look at visual arts will enrich your understanding of what it means to work, and create, in a Californian mood. Theodore Roosevelt once said “when I am in California, I am west of the west.” Let’s see what he meant!

English R1A—Section 1
Race and Racism in American Culture

Reflecting on W.E.B Dubois’s proclamation in 1903 that “the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line,” this class will examine how the fictions of race and experiences of racism continue to shape American culture in the 21st century.

Department Abbreviation: 
XCOLWRI R1A
Prerequisite: 

Only for students who have not passed the UC Analytical Writing Placement Exam or have not satisfied the Entry-Level Writing requirement. 

Satisfies: 
Both the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement and the first-half (Part A) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

An intensive, accelerated course satisfying concurrently the requirements of the UC Entry Level Writing Requirement and the first half of Reading and Composition. Readings will include imaginative, expository and argumentative texts representative of the range of those encountered in the undergraduate curriculum and will feature authors from diverse social and cultural backgrounds and perspectives. Instruction in writing a range of discourse forms and in the revision of papers.

Fall 2021 Sections 
College Writing R1A—Section 3
There and Back Again (FPF Thread: California)

We will use personal experience and our fiction and nonfiction readings about the Bay Area to question the role of setting and place in our lives. We will read authors of many different perspectives in order to establish our own confident academic voices, and we will value the process of writing alongside its products.

College Writing R1A—Section 4
Decentralized Identity and the Reimagination of Citizenship (FPF Thread: Citizenship)

This course will seek to reimagine citizenship at the state, national, and global scales by examining our understanding of the concept in the context of the decentralized identities made possible by modern communications technologies.

 
Department Abbreviation: 
XCOMLIT R1A
Prerequisite: 

Completion of the UC Entry Level Writing Requirement or UC Analytical Writing Placement Exam

Satisfies: 
The first-half (Part A) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better.
Course Description: 

Expository writing based on analysis of selected masterpieces of ancient and modern literature. You will come to understand the readings through class discussion and writing and revising papers that analyze the readings in academic argument form. Learn to read and write at the analytical and critical levels required at Berkeley.

Fall 2021 Sections
Comparative Literature R1A—Section 1
Lost and Found in the American City 

As cultural, political, and economic centers, cities can foster connection, creativity, and belonging. What is lost or pushed into possible oblivion in and by the city? We’ll explore the landscapes of four of America’s most iconic cities—New York, Mexico City, Buenos Aires, and Los Angeles—and consider the ways in which urban spaces are experienced, constructed, and imagined as spaces where some get lost, others found.

 

Reading and Composition Part B

Department Abbreviation: 
XENGLIS R1B
Prerequisite: 

Completion of both the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement and the first-half (Part A) of the Reading and Composition requirement

Satisfies: 
The second-half (Part B) of the reading and composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

Training in writing expository prose. Further instruction in expository writing in conjunction with reading literature.

Fall 2021 Sections
English R1B—Section 1
Life on the Hyphen (FPF themes: Citizenship and Social Justice)

In this course, we read texts by Toni Morrison, Kiran Desai and Chang-rae Lee to better understand the complexities of life in the Americas as we balance our lives on the hyphen as “-American.” This course develops your critical thinking and writing skills along with research techniques.

English R1B—Section 2, Section 3
Dystopia, Utopia, or Reality? (FPF themes: Citizenship and Social Justice)

If utopia describes an ideal society or a “good place,” then dystopia describes its opposite: an unjust and cruel society, a bad place, or an apocalyptic world. What can literature teach us about utopian and dystopian elements in our own worlds?

Department Abbreviation: 
XFILM R1B
Prerequisite: 

Completion of both the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement and the first-half (Part A) of the Reading and Composition requirement

Satisfies: 
The second-half (Part B) of the reading and composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

Intensive argumentative writing stimulated through selected readings, films, and class discussion.

Fall 2021 Section
Film R1B - Section 1
Stardom, Spectatorship, and Difference (FPF Thread: Social Justice)

This class interrogates the relationships between stars and their social contexts. What does it mean to present an “image” of oneself? How can that “image” be read onscreen? The class will engage a wide range of critical texts that focus on the history of the “art of personality” with a particular emphasis on the history of film stardom, including how stars circulate in society, how spectators respond to representations of stardom, how forms of social difference inform this spectatorship, and how the phenomenon of stardom has changed from the 19th century to the digital era.

Main Campus Electives Snippet

Adding Main Campus Electives

FPF students are welcome to enroll in most 1-2 unit electives on the main campus. These courses are also referred to as "enrichment opportunities." They often do not fulfill college or major requirements, and are intended to supplement students' core courses. Be sure to review the course description for prerequisites or co-requisites. 

FPF students may not enroll in Freshmen & Sophomore Seminars, or Data Science connector courses. 

Students can contact their FPF advisor for questions about any other enrichment opportunities which fall outside of the FPF core curriculum.

Common Course Categories

Berkeley Connect: Berkeley Connect matches undergraduates with an experienced graduate student pursuing a PhD at Berkeley who will be their mentor for the semester. To sign up, students enroll in a Berkeley Connect seminar.

DeCal Courses: The Democratic Education at Cal (DeCal) Program is an aggregate of student-run courses. Students create and facilitate their own classes on a variety of subjects!

Performing Arts classes (Music Ensembles, TDPS): The Music Department offers a number of performance ensembles including African Music, Jazz & Improvised Music, University Chorus & Chamber Chorus, Symphony Orchestra, and more.  TDPS offers several theater and dance courses.

Physical Education: The Physical Education (P.E.) Program offers a variety of courses in Dance, Fitness, Aquatics, Team and Individual Sports, and Martial Arts from beginning through advanced levels.

ROTC: Courses required by Army ROTC, Air Force ROTC, and NROTC.

Theme Housing: Students who live in Theme Housing take a for-credit seminar course associated with their theme community.

Undergraduate Research Apprentice Program: The Undergraduate Research Apprentice Program (URAP) gives undergraduate students the opportunity to work with UC Berkeley professors on research projects. The program helps students to gain access to the work faculty do outside of the classroom, and develop their research skills by contributing to the faculty mentors’ projects. Students in any college and any class level are welcome to apply, although they may not be qualified for every project.