Course Offerings

The Fall Program for Freshmen offers a tailored curriculum that prepares our students for success and includes courses first-year students need, such as major prerequisites, Reading & Composition, L&S Breadth Requirements, and electives. Our class sizes range from 14 to 100 seats, and 80% of our classes have fewer than 50 students. Many of these same courses are taught in 300 to 1,000-person lectures on the main campus!

FPF students are required to take at least three core classes within the FPF course offerings during their first semester. A "core class" is typically defined as a course for which you earn 3 or more units.

African American Studies 98—Homegrown Hip-Hop (2 Units)
Department: 
Electives
Department Abbreviation: 
XAFRICA 98
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Electives do not fulfill University or breadth requirements, but are great opportunities to enrich your schedule in areas you find interesting.
Course Description: 

From its inception, Hip Hop has been (and continues to be) more than just a genre of music. Hip Hop has always served as an umbrella term encompassing art, music, dance, literature, identity, style, entrepreneurship and politics. This course will utilize an interactive and multi-media approach to engaging with Hip Hop Culture in the Bay Area. As the course will deal with contemporary Hip Hop culture in the Bay Area, it will also focus on the regional influences underpinning the Bay Area's distinct Hip-Hop landscape. We will also make it a point to deconstruct the multiple eras of Hip-Hop/rap in the Bay Area, and critically appraise the content contained in Bay Area Hip Hop records. It bears repeating, Hip-Hop culture is not only a source of entertainment within our everyday lives, but also a medium that analyzes/provides commentary regarding social, economic, political and cultural issues dealing with cultural identity, cultural genocide, misogyny, racism, classism, materialism, freedom of speech and freedom of sexuality. During the duration of this semester we will think critically, embrace debate, and delve into the study of Hip Hop culture. 

Anthropology 1—Introduction to Biological Anthropology (4 units)
Department: 
Biological Science
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XANTHRO 1
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Either the Biological Science or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

An introductory course providing a comprehensive introduction to the field of Biological Anthropology.  It is a study of the processes and products of human evolution.  Topics we will cover include evolutionary history and theory, systematics, genetics, primate behavior and ecology, comparative primate anatomy, the primate fossil record with emphasis on the human lineage, human variation and adaptation, the origins of culture, and human biocultural evolution. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Art 98—Symbolic and Practical: Art and Social Justice (2 Units)
Department: 
Electives
Department Abbreviation: 
XART 98
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Electives do not fulfill University or breadth requirements, but are great opportunities to enrich your schedule in areas you find interesting.
Course Description: 

Artists have long made works that address issues of justice, equity, freedom and oppression. These works, and the strategies artists employ, are frequently informed by, produced through or in dialogue with social movements that seek to alter the conditions of society. The relationship between art and social movements raises questions about what it means to do art and what it means to do social justice. In order to explore the overlaps, tensions, and distinctions between the symbolic and practical practices of artists and social movements, this course combines student experimentation, readings, videos, discussion and site visits throughout the San Francisco Bay Area.

Astronomy 10—Introduction to General Astronomy (4 units)
Department: 
Physical Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XASTRON 10
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Physical Science breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

A description of modern astronomy with emphasis on the structure and evolution of stars, galaxies, and the Universe. Additional topics optionally discussed include quasars, pulsars, black holes, and extraterrestrial communication. A minimum of high school–level algebra and geometry is assumed, but equation solving and memorization are not emphasized. Most students are not physical science majors, and the emphasis is on understanding the skills used in astrophysics that are of interest to society. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Chemistry 1AL—General Chemistry Laboratory (2 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XCHEM 1AL
Prerequisite: 

Chem 1A taken concurrently; or: CHEM 1A, with min grade of C-; or AP CHEM with min score of 4; or CHEM HL IB with min score of 5; or GCE A-Level CHEM with min grade of C.

Course Description: 

An experimental approach to chemical sciences with emphasis on developing fundamental, reproducible laboratory technique and a goal of understanding and achieving precision and accuracy in laboratory experiments. Proper use of laboratory equipment and standard wet chemical methods are practiced. Areas of investigations include chemical equilibria, spectroscopy, nanotechnology, green chemistry, and thermochemistry. One hour of lecture and three hours of labaratory per week.

Chemistry 1A—General Chemistry (3 units)
Department: 
Physical Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XCHEM 1A
Prerequisite: 

None, but High School Chemistry recommended. Co-enrollment in a discussion section is required. Co-enrollment in XCHEM 1AL is recommended but not required.

Satisfies: 
Physical Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade.
Course Description: 

Stoichiometry of chemical reactions, quantum mechanical description of atoms, the elements and periodic table, chemical bonding, real and ideal gases, thermochemistry, introduction to thermodynamics and equilibrium, acid-base and solubility equilibria, introduction to oxidation-reduction reactions, introduction to chemical kinetics. Three hours of lecture, one hour of discussion, and zero-two hours of voluntary per week.

College Writing R1A—Accelerated Reading and Composition (6 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XCOLWRI R1A
Prerequisite: 

Only for students who have not passed the UC Analytical Writing Placement Exam or have not satisfied the Entry-Level Writing requirement. 

Satisfies: 
Both the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement and the first-half (Part A) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

An intensive, accelerated course satisfying concurrently the requirements of the UC Entry Level Writing Requirement and the first half of Reading and Composition. Readings will include imaginative, expository and argumentative texts representative of the range of those encountered in the undergraduate curriculum and will feature authors from diverse social and cultural backgrounds and perspectives. Instruction in writing a range of discourse forms and in the revision of papers. Six hours of class per week.

Sections 
College Writing R1A—Section 1
The Bay Area

In our class, we will use personal experience and our fiction and nonfiction readings about the Bay Area to question the role of place in our lives. We will read authors of many different perspectives in order to establish our own confident academic voices, and we will value the process of writing alongside its products.

College Writing R1A—Section 2, Section 4
Human Fallibility in the 21st Century

This course will focus on the technology age and its influence on human behavior. Through close readings of essays and fiction, and through class discussion, we will explore the idea of identity, perception, and character in the 21st century. In the process we will discuss the increasing need for speed in our everyday lives and its advantages and disadvantages.

College Writing R1A—Section 3
Social Justice Movements in the Bay Area

The Bay Area has and long and abundant history of engagement with social justice beyond the Free Speech Movement. We will explore social conditions and the individuals that inspired and nurtured social justice movements in the Bay Area through literature, journalism, and film.

College Writing R1A—Section 5, Section 6
Human Rights and Creative Resistance

Imagine the ideal world you’d like to live in. How do people treat each other in this world? In this course, you’ll deepen your understanding of human rights and current global issues through the close examination of fiction, graphic memoir, essays, multimedia, primary documents, and rich discussion. We’ll explore how people challenge systemic injustice and promote citizen empowerment creatively.

College Writing R1A—Section 7
The Dilemmas that Define Us

This intensive reading and writing course will examine a variety of dilemmas --ethical, personal, educational--that face us. We will read and write about issues using a diverse array of rhetorical strategies. Through critical reading, analytical writing, and class discussion, we will explore dilemmas that not only affect our society, but also ourselves.

Comparative Literature R1A—English Composition in Connection With the Reading of World Literature (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XCOMLIT R1A
Prerequisite: 

Completion of the UC Entry Level Writing Requirement or UC Analytical Writing Placement Exam

Satisfies: 
The first-half (Part A) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better.
Course Description: 

Expository writing based on analysis of selected masterpieces of ancient and modern literature. You will come to understand the readings through class discussion and writing and revising papers that analyze the readings in academic argument form. Learn to read and write at the analytical and critical levels required at Berkeley. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections
Comparative Literature R1A—Section 1
Lost and Found in the American City

As cultural, political, and economic centers, cities can foster connection, creativity, and belonging. What is lost or pushed into possible oblivion in and by the city? We’ll explore the landscapes of four of America’s most iconic cities—New York, Mexico City, Buenos Aires, and Los Angeles—and consider the ways in which urban spaces are experienced, constructed, and imagined as spaces where some get lost, others found.

Comparative Literature R1A—Section 2
Writing Eros: Literature and Romantic Love

In this course we’ll hone our skills at reading, writing, listening, speaking, and thinking while studying texts that probe the nature of romantic love and challenge conventional beliefs about it. Readings may include Alain de Botton’s On Love, Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Chekhov’s “The Lady with the Little Dog,” a selection from Plato’s Symposium, Ang Lee’s film Sense and Sensibility, and poems by Sappho, Edna St. Vincent Millay, and Elizabeth Barrett Browning.

Earth and Planetary Science (Geology) 80—Environmental Earth Sciences: Soils (3 units)
Department: 
Physical Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XEPS 80
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Physical Science breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

This course focuses on the processes on and in the earth that shape the environment. Humanity's use of land and oceans is examined based on an understanding of these processes.Three hours of lecture per week.

English R1A—Reading and Composition (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XENGLIS R1A
Prerequisite: 

Completion of the UC Entry-level Writing Requirement

Satisfies: 
The first-half (Part A) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better.
Course Description: 

Training in writing expository prose. Instruction in expository writing in conjunction with reading literature. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections
English R1A—Section 1
21st Century American Literature

21st c. American Literature is all around you. We'll discuss a novel, see a play (Suzan-Lori Parks' White Noise), and we'll also study songs, TV series, short stories, plus do detailed analyses of your own 750 word essays, which are also our course texts.

English R1A—Section 3, Section 7
Daring Greatly

We will look at three very different texts--a dialogue by Plato, a book about Hmong people in central California, a science-fiction novel set on a world where gender only happens once a month--and ask how the characters act courageously to meet and deal with great challenges. Essays, quizzes, speeches, rereadings, and lots of discussion.

English R1A—Section 4
Finding Meaning Through Self-Awareness: The Perennial Heroic Struggle

Hamlet's "To be or not to be" is among the most universally known and quoted lines from literature, and the timeless existential question he poses confronts us all. In this class we will explore, along with a number of other themes, how the difficult battle with oneself can win what almost everyone is searching for--meaning.

English R1A—Section 5, Section 11
Writer’s Block (and Other Sometimes Hidden Obstacles to Academic Ambitions and Personal Dreams)

In this class, you will develop college-level critical thinking, writing, and class discussion skills while you read poems, autobiographies, short stories, and novels about ambition, achievement, and about managing familial or cultural expectations while staying true to personal dreams and learning how to stay out of your own way.

English R1A—Section 6, Section 10
Imagining the Modern World

What is art today? A giant puppy made of flowers? A fake Prada store in the Texas desert? We’ll address some challenges to defining contemporary art and understanding its role in our lives. We’ll investigate specific artists and movements as test cases, and will use what we learn to unpack some works of fiction, too. No prior knowledge of art history is necessary.

English R1A—Section 9
Identity as Performance

People often say that our actions speak louder than words. We connect with our immediate socio-political circumstances, which then determine the performances of our identities. Personal identity is thus not an unchangeable idea, but its performance is constantly in flux depending on the context. We will examine five plays in this course focusing on the construction of identity through performance.

English R1A—Section 12
Migrant Lives

In our time, unprecedented numbers of people are living lives in motion. War, climate change, social upheaval, and economic insecurity push migrants from the places of their birth; hope pulls them toward new points on the map. Together we will read and write about narratives that emerge from and bear witness to migrant lives.

English R1A—Section 13
“Forget it Jake, it’s Chinatown”: Chinatown and the Culture of Exclusion

Taking Chinatown as a case study, this course will explore what literary and filmic representations of racialized urban spaces reveal about American politics and culture. We will consider the formal strategies used to construct the geography of Chinatown and how Chinatown is deployed as a key site for popular imaginations about urban crime, poverty, race, and sexuality.

English R1A—Section 14, Section 15
Explorers, Monsters, and Magicians

This class will help you develop sharp writing and thinking skills that you’ll use throughout college and beyond. Discover your voice by writing about texts that ask and answer questions like: What powers or risks go with living as an explorer, an outsider, or even a monster? How far should we go for the dreams and inventions we create?

English R1B—Reading and Composition (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XENGLIS R1B
Prerequisite: 

Completion of both the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement and the first-half (Part A) of the Reading and Composition requirement

Satisfies: 
The second-half (Part B) of the reading and composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

Training in writing expository prose. Further instruction in expository writing in conjunction with reading literature. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections
English R1B—Section 1
Carceral Geographies

The term 'carceral' is used to refer to anything that pertains to prisons and imprisonment. In this course, we will examine the spaces of imprisonment from the border to internment camps to prisons. We will look at how the movement of people through space is shaped and controlled through carceral technologies.

English R1B—Section 3, Section 5
Dystopia, Utopia, or Reality?

If utopia describes an ideal society or a “good place,” then dystopia describes its opposite: an unjust and cruel society, a bad place, or an apocalyptic world. What can literature teach us about utopian and dystopian elements in our own worlds?

English R1B—Section 4
Journeys

In this course we will explore literature not only from different countries, and from different genres (the epic poem, the experimental novel), but we’ll also journey chronologically through different historical epochs, reading in each.

English R1B—Section 6
Things Fall Apart

Contemporary life Is often experienced as fragmenting people’s sense of self and their sense of community. We will study how this experience is articulated in recent American fiction and consider whether and how writing fiction can counter this sense of fragmentation.

English R1B—Section 7, Section 8
Crisis and Catharsis

Humans need stories almost as much as we need food, especially when we’re growing up. Stories can be fun or romantic. But many memorable works of fiction capture tragedies, personal or historical, better than nonfiction can. This class will explore how writers imaginatively transform personal crises into stories that inspire us, even if they disturb us.

English R1B—Section 10
Life on the Hyphen

This course is about life in the Americas. It’s about life that beckons, it’s about a life that promises, it’s about a life that often fails—it’s about your in this country, your life-on-the-hyphen. We read a variety of literary texts to better understand the complexities and nuances of navigating our own lives on the hyphen.

Ethnic Studies 197—Field Study in Community (2 units)
Department: 
Electives
Department Abbreviation: 
XETHSTUD 197
Prerequisite: 

None.

Course Description: 

Supervised community field study. Two hours of lecture per week.

Class Description: Field Study in Community: Creating change and reflecting on my role in Berkeley and in communities. This two-unit seminar on concepts of service, social justice, and community engagement allows students to incorporate their academic scholarship and personal experience. Field projects and guest speakers in the class provide opportunities for students to explore Berkeley’s rich history within social movements while reflecting on their calling and commitment to using their education to better society.

Ethnic Studies XB21AC—A Comparative Survey of Racial and Ethnic Groups in the United States (4 units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XETHSTD
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Examine the historical experiences of European immigrants, African Americans and Latinos, emphasizing the themes of migration and economic change since the late-19th century. You will also learn about the experiences of Asian Americans, Native Americans and recently arrived immigrants in the context of the course themes. Throughout the course, discuss intragroup differences such as gender, socioeconomic stratification and cultural variation. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Film 50—Film for Non-majors: California in the Cinematic Imagination (4 Units)
Department: 
Arts and Literature
Department Abbreviation: 
XFILM 50
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Arts and Literature breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

This course examines how California has figured in the cinematic imagination as an industrial center and as a landscape of fantasy, site for the formulation and revision of national mythologies regarding the American West. We will assemble a cinematic history of the state –from the founding of the Spanish missions to the 21st century –while asking how filmmakers from D. W. Griffith to P. T. Anderson figure the California landscape as both wasteland and promised land, iconic backdrop for the examination of American national identity and politics, the construction of gender, and narratives of racial and class struggle. Texts will address the history of the state, the history of the film industry therein, and formal, narrative, and ideological analyses of the films that structure the course.

Gender and Women's Studies 50AC—Gender in American Culture (3 units)
Department: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XGWS 50AC
Prerequisite: 

None.

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and the Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade.
Course Description: 

A multi-disciplinary course designed to provide students with an opportunity to work with faculty investigating the topic gender in American culture. Three hours of lecture per week.

Class Description: The course attempts to problematize "gendered" identity constructs by analyzing writings of Native-American, African-American and Asian-American writers. It questions how shifting positionalities impact gender, class and race. It challenges these texts as mere narratives of exclusion and exploitation to acknowledge them as transforming identity politics and gendered subjectivity to invest the politics of survival in "between" worlds with a new meaning.

Geography 30—The Ocean World (4 units)
Department: 
Biological Science
Physical Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XGEOG 30
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Either the Biological Science or the Physical Science category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Gain an introduction to the cultural and physical geography of the world's oceans. Topics include ecology of ocean biota and environments; history and geography of ocean peoples, cultures and resource use; problems confronting ocean peoples and environments; and new approaches to saving the oceans. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Geography 50AC—California (4 units)
Department: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XGEOG 50AC
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences, American Cultures
Course Description: 

California had been called "the great exception" and "America, only more so." Yet few of us pay attention to its distinctive traits and to its effects beyond our borders. California may be "a state of mind," but it is also the most dynamic place in the most powerful country in the world, and would be the 8th largest economy if it were a country. Its wealth has been built on mining, agriculture, industry, trade, and finance. Natural abundance and geographic advantage have played their parts, but the state's greatest resource has been its wealth and diversity of people, who have made it a center of technological and cultural innovation from Hollywood to Silicon Valley. Yet California has a dark side of exploitation and racialization.

Global Studies 10B—Critical Issues in Global Studies (3 units)
Department: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XGLOBAL 10B
Prerequisite: 

None. 

Satisfies: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade.
Course Description: 

Global Studies 10B serves as an introduction to the Global Studies curriculum. Global Studies 10B introduces students to global issues through the lens of the humanities, such as art, literature, film, and culture. The topic of Global Studies 10B will vary from year to year, depending on the instructor. Students in each iteration of this course will learn about salient global interactions from a variety of cultural perspectives. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion section per week.

Class Description: Media and cinema in global cultures. In this course, we will study media and cinema as everyday stories deepening our relationship with global cultures and flows. We will study closely how visual storytelling affects our understanding of race, gender, health, immigration, justice, and other related issues in global cultures and politics.

History 7B (AC)—The United States From Civil War to Present (4 units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XHISTOR 7B
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade.
Course Description: 

Examine the experiences and conflicts that comprise American society's history. You will be exposed to a wide range of historical actors and dialogues in order to understand the past, from the perspective of the men and women who experienced it and to gain some insight into the daily lives of Americans: work and leisure, cultures and ideologies, relations with one another, and the political and economic system under which they lived. Lectures and readings focus on the complex interplay among political, economic and cultural interests, and will examine, in particular depth, race relations, the laboring classes, reform movements, the interior of American lives, the changing conditions for success and survival in the culture Americans were shaping, and the emerging role of the United States as a world power. Three hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per week.

Integrative Biology 33—The Age of Dinosaurs (3 units)
Department: 
Biological Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XINTEGB 33
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Biological Science breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

In this lecture course, focus on dinosaurs from their appearance to extinction. Learn about the dinosaur skeleton, reconstructing dinosaurs, basic principles of evolution, classification and adaptation, and a survey of dinosaur types. You consider dinosaur reproduction, the question of dinosaur endothermy and the origin of birds. You also survey the other animals that coexisted with the dinosaurs to build a picture of the Mesozoic world. Lectures are often illustrated with slides. Three hours of lecture per week.

Legal Studies R1B—Reading and Composition in Connection With the Law as a Social Institution (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XLEGALS R1B
Prerequisite: 

Completion of both the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement and the first-half (Part A) of the Reading and Composition requirement.

Satisfies: 
The second-half (Part B) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

Develop your skills in critical reading, writing and analysis, and complete a series of essays culminating in a research paper relating to law, legal actors and legal institutions. Emphasis is placed on the process of writing, including developing research questions, constructing an argument and revising for content and style. Three hours of lecture per week.

Section
Legal Studies R1B—Section 1

This course examines racial and gender inequalities in the American property law system, from the past to the present. Case studies include slavery, the gender wage gap, and the housing crisis. As a result of this course, students can expect to hone their critical reading skills, express their own arguments clearly, and develop their own research projects.

Letters and Science 1—Exploring the Liberal Arts (2 units)
Department: 
Electives
Department Abbreviation: 
XL&S 1
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Electives do not fulfill University or breadth requirements, but are great opportunities to enrich your schedule in areas you find interesting.
Course Description: 

Get introduced to the intellectual landscape of the College of Letters and Science, revealing the underlying assumptions, goals and structure of a liberal arts education. Topics include the difference between the College of Letters and Science and the professional schools, the rationale behind the breadth requirement, the approaches and methodologies of each of the divisions in the college, and the benefits of engaging in research as an undergraduate. The ultimate goal of the course is to transform you into an informed participant in your educational experiences so that you can make the most of your years at Berkeley. One-and-a-half hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Linguistics 55AC—The American Languages (4 units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XLINGUI 55AC
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Using a linguistic view of the history, society and culture of the United States, explore the variety of languages spoken in our country and the issues surrounding them: language and ethnicity, politics of linguistic pluralism versus societal monolingualism, language and education, language shift, loss, retention and renewal. Languages include English (standard and nonstandard, African-American English), pidgins and creoles, Native American languages, Spanish, French, and immigrant languages from Asia and Europe. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Mathematics 10A—Methods of Mathematics: Calculus, Statistics, and Combinatorics (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XMATH 10A
Examples of Intended Majors: 
Integrative Biology, Molecular and Cell Biology, other life sciences
Prerequisite: 

Three and one-half years of high school math, including trigonometry and analytic geometry, plus a satisfactory grade in one of the following: CEEB MAT test, an AP test, the UC/CSU math diagnostic test or Math 32. It is strongly recommended that you take 1A only if you have already completed precalculus.

Satisfies: 
Quantitative Reasoning requirement if completed with a grade of C− or better. Some majors have specific grade requirements. Math 10A is required to continue on to Math 10B.
Course Description: 

Intended for majors in the life sciences. Introduction to differential and integral calculus of functions of one variable, ordinary differential equations, and matrix algebra and systems of linear equations. Three hours of lecture and three hours of discussion per week. 

Mathematics 16A—Analytic Geometry and Calculus (3 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XMATH 16A
Examples of Intended Majors: 
Business Administration (Haas), Architecture, Economics, Public Health, Environmental Sciences
Prerequisite: 

Three years of high school mathematics, including trigonometry, plus a satisfactory grade in one of the following: CEEB MAT test, an AP test, the UC/CSU math diagnostic exam or Math 32. It is strongly recommended that you take 16A only if you have already completed precalculus. Students will not receive credit for 16A after taking 1A. Two units of Math 16A may be used to remove a deficient grade in Math 1A.

Satisfies: 
Quantitative Reasoning requirement if completed with a grade of C− or better. Some majors have specific grade requirements. Math 16A (or equivalent) is required to continue on to Math 16B.
Course Description: 

Math 16A covers much of the same basic topics as Math 1A, but does not include in-depth calculus and does not prepare you to continue on to Match 53 or 54. Math 16A introduces integration, the fundamental theorem of calculus, areas in the plane and other applications of the definite integral. This course is intended for students in the life and social sciences whose programs require only one year of calculus.Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Mathematics 1A—Calculus (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XMATH 1A
Examples of Intended Majors: 
Physical Sciences, Engineering, Mathematics, Computer Sciences, Molecular and Cell Biology, Economics, Astronomy, Chemistry, Geology, Statistics
Prerequisite: 

Three-and-a-half years of high school mathematics, including trigonometry and analytic geometry, plus a satisfactory grade in one of the following: CEEB MAT test, an AP test, the UC/CSU math diagnostic test or Math 32. It is strongly recommended that you take 1A only if you have already completed precalculus.

Satisfies: 
Quantitative Reasoning requirement if completed with a grade of C− or better. Some majors have specific grade requirements. Math 1A (or equivalent) is required to continue on to Math 1B.
Course Description: 

Math 1A covers the topics of calculus of one variable, mainly with derivatives, and applications such as graphing and optimization. It introduces the idea of integration and applications such as volumes of revolution. Students are expected to understand some theorems and their proofs. This rigorous course emphasizes conceptual understanding and is intended for students in engineering and physical sciences. Three hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per week.

Topics Covered: 
Intuitive and precise limit definitions, continuity, definition of the derivative, shortcut rules for finding derivatives, product rule, quotient rule, chain rule, implicit differentiation, related rates, linear approximations and differentials, mean value theorem, L'Hopital's rule, curve sketching, optimization, Newton's Method, definition of Riemann integral, Fundamental Theorem of Calculus (Parts 1 and 2), natural logarithm defined as an integral, area between two curves, volumes of solids of revolution.
Skills Needed: 
  • Facility with a scientific calculator or graphing calculator may be required
    • Ability to determine the value of a complicated expression using a scientific or graphing calculator
  • Facility with fractions
    • Ability to simplify rational expressions and solve rational equations
  • Facility with algebra
    • Ability to solve linear equations
    • Ability to solve quadratic equations by factoring, completing the square and using the quadratic formula
    • Ability to solve a linear system of equations
  • Facility with graphing
    • Ability to identify and plot points on the Cartesian plane
    • Ability to graph lines
  • Facility with exponential and logarithmic functions
    • Familiarity with e and natural logarithms
    • Ability to simplify expressions containing logarithms
    • Ability to solve logarithmic equations
      • Ability to graph exponential and logarithmic functions
  • Facility with trigonometry
    • Familiarity with radian measure
    • Ability to compute trigonometric functions of simple angles
    • Ability to use the Pythagorean Theorem
    • Ability to solve triangle using the Law of Sines or the Law of Cosines
    • Knowledge of addition formula for sine and cosine
Mathematics 1B—Calculus (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XMATH 1B
Examples of Intended Majors: 
Physical Sciences, Engineering, Mathematics, Computer Sciences, Molecular and Cell Biology, Economics, Astronomy, Chemistry, Geology, Statistics
Prerequisite: 

Math 1A or equivalent coursework; please check Assist.org or with the Office of Undergraduate Admissions to make sure your coursework is equivalent to UC Berkeley's Math 1A.

Satisfies: 
Quantitative Reasoning requirement if completed with a grade of C− or better. Some majors have specific grade requirements. Math 1B is required to continue on to Math 53 or 54, and is recommended to continue on to Math 55.
Course Description: 

Math 1B is a continuation of Math 1A. It involves integration techniques and applications and introduces infinite series and first- and second-order differential equations and their uses. It is intended for students with majors in engineering, math and some sciences. Three hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per week.

Mathematics 32—Precalculus (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XMATH 32
Examples of Intended Majors: 
Any major that requires Math 16A or Math 1A
Prerequisite: 

Three years of high school mathematics and at least a score of 560 on the SAT I Math portion. Email fpf@berkeley.edu if you need to take math but have scored below a 560 on the SAT I.

Satisfies: 
Quantitative Reasoning requirement if completed with a grade of C− or better. Some majors have specific grade requirements.
Course Description: 

This course is designed for students who wish to prepare for calculus. It covers exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometry, complex numbers, binomial theorem, conics and analytic geometry. Three hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per week.

Molecular and Cell Biology 32—Introduction to Human Physiology (3 units)
Department: 
Biological Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XMCELLB 32
Prerequisite: 

One year of high school or college chemistry

Satisfies: 
Biological Science breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

You gain a comprehensive introduction to human cell biology by concentrating on basic mechanisms underlying human life processes, including cells and membranes; nerve and muscle function; cardiovascular, respiratory, renal and gastrointestinal physiology; and metabolism, endocrinology and reproduction. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Music 27—Introduction to Western Music (4 units)
Department: 
Arts and Literature
Department Abbreviation: 
XMUSIC 27
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Arts and Literature breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

This course is devoted to the development of listening skills and appreciation of the major forms of Western art music. It is not intended for music majors. The guided listening, lectures and discussions present music as a language in which students can develop a basic fluency. The recorded music used in the course covers the gamut of Western art music from the Renaissance to the present day. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Philosophy 2—Individual Morality and Social Justice (4 units)
Department: 
Philosophy and Values
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XPHILOS 2
Prerequisite: 

None; however, this is a writing- and reading-intensive course, and students' writing skills should exceed the College Writing course level.

Satisfies: 
Either the Philosophy and Values or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Survey the basic questions of moral and political philosophy and some important attempts to answer them, with particular attention to topical issues (abortion, the ethics of eating animals and gay marriage, for example). What is the moral thing to do with respect to these issues? Is there a fact of the matter what the moral thing to do is, or does it depend on one's feelings, upbringing or culture? Why should we do what is morally right? Why should we tolerate alien moral beliefs and practices? What role should governments play? Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Philosophy 3—The Nature of Mind (4 units)
Department: 
Philosophy and Values
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XPHILOS 3
Prerequisite: 

None; however, this is a writing- and reading-intensive course, and students' writing skills should exceed the College Writing course level.

Satisfies: 
Philosophy and Values breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Gain an introduction to the philosophy of mind, and to philosophical reading, writing and thinking. What is it to have a mind? What kinds of properties are so-called mental properties? What is the connection between knowledge of one's own mental states and knowledge of the mental states of others? What is the connection between knowledge of one's own mental states and knowledge of the world around us? What are we doing when we explain people's behavior in terms of their beliefs, desires and other contenful states? You will also examine the ways in which the nature of our mental states can be said to depend on our relations to features of our environment. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Political Science 2—Introduction to Comparative Politics (4 units)
Department: 
International Studies
Department Abbreviation: 
XPOLSCI 2
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Either the International Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Gain a comparative study of countries and their different levels of economic and political development. Examine what they are like; how they came to be the way they are; and their particular expression in Western, Communist and Third-World settings. Topics include the nature of power, processes of politics, and the cultural and social forces that have given countries their distinctive identities. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Psychology 1—General Psychology (3 units)
Department: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XPSYCH 1
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Examine a representative sample of topics in psychology, including the operation of neurons and the brain; animal behavior; sensory and perceptual processes; obedience to authority; and theories of personality, mental disorders and psychotherapy. Topics also include the history of psychology (with brief readings from Plato, Darwin, James, Freud and Watson), recent ideas about the role of consciousness in cognition and computer modeling of cognitive processes. Two hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Rhetoric 2—Fundamentals of Public Speaking (2 units)
Department: 
Electives
Department Abbreviation: 
XRHETOR 2
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Electives do not fulfill University or breadth requirements, but are great opportunities to enrich your schedule in areas you find interesting.
Course Description: 

Gain help in establishing and developing basic competence in the skills required for effective oral presentations, whether prepared in advance or spontaneous. You cover formulating a clear communicative intent, basic principles of communication and theories of persuasion, organization of presentation material, delivery, use of visual aids and response to audience questions. You make six different oral presentations during the term, with ample opportunity for ungraded practice and coaching prior to evaluation. Three hours of class per week. This course is offered only on a Passed/Not Passed basis. Although this course does not satisfy a College of Letters and Science breadth requirement, units are granted.

Rhetoric R1A—The Craft of Writing (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XRHETOR R1A
Prerequisite: 

Completion of the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement or UC Analytical Writing Placement Exam

Satisfies: 
The first-half (Part A) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

Learn the principles of argumentative writing and emphasizes close readings of texts that reveal their rhetorical structure and intended audience. You learn to identify and interpret a text's thesis and intention and make compelling arguments for your position using textual evidence. Three hours of lecture per week.

Section
Rhetoric R1A—Section 1
The Reader as Archaeologist: Rhetorically Excavating Issues

Become explorers excavating issues from medical care to the justice system. Can you distinguish opinion from argument? Back your interpretation with textual evidence? Persuade a skeptical reader/audience without resorting demagoguery? We focus on classical structure coupled with engaging style. This seminar-style class engages you in reasoned discourse. Strengthen your critical thinking, writing, and speaking that define university-level advancement.

Statistics 2—Introduction to Statistics (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XSTAT 2
Examples of Intended Majors: 
Psychology, Political Economy, Development Studies, Legal Studies, Nutritional Science: Dietetics, Nutritional Science: Physiology and Metabolism
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Quantitative Reasoning requirement if completed with a grade of C− or better. Some majors have specific grade requirements. Stat 2 does NOT fulfill prerequisites for the economics major, statistics major or the Haas Undergraduate Business Program.
Course Description: 

This course introduces basic concepts of probability and statistical inference and covers standard methods for making inferences about populations from information contained in sample data: the methods used in sample surveys, opinion polls, research studies and industry. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Breadth Courses

The College of Letters and Science Seven-Course Breadth requirement and American Cultures Breadth requirement are the foundation of the college's liberal arts program. It can only be fulfilled with college coursework; AP exams and other high school work do not count toward this requirement.

= Courses that also fulfill the American Cultures requirement

Arts and Literature

Music 27—Introduction to Western Music (4 units)
Department: 
Arts and Literature
Department Abbreviation: 
XMUSIC 27
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Arts and Literature breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

This course is devoted to the development of listening skills and appreciation of the major forms of Western art music. It is not intended for music majors. The guided listening, lectures and discussions present music as a language in which students can develop a basic fluency. The recorded music used in the course covers the gamut of Western art music from the Renaissance to the present day. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Film 50—Film for Non-majors: California in the Cinematic Imagination (4 Units)
Department: 
Arts and Literature
Department Abbreviation: 
XFILM 50
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Arts and Literature breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

This course examines how California has figured in the cinematic imagination as an industrial center and as a landscape of fantasy, site for the formulation and revision of national mythologies regarding the American West. We will assemble a cinematic history of the state –from the founding of the Spanish missions to the 21st century –while asking how filmmakers from D. W. Griffith to P. T. Anderson figure the California landscape as both wasteland and promised land, iconic backdrop for the examination of American national identity and politics, the construction of gender, and narratives of racial and class struggle. Texts will address the history of the state, the history of the film industry therein, and formal, narrative, and ideological analyses of the films that structure the course.

Biological Science

Geography 30—The Ocean World (4 units)
Department: 
Biological Science
Physical Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XGEOG 30
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Either the Biological Science or the Physical Science category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Gain an introduction to the cultural and physical geography of the world's oceans. Topics include ecology of ocean biota and environments; history and geography of ocean peoples, cultures and resource use; problems confronting ocean peoples and environments; and new approaches to saving the oceans. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Integrative Biology 33—The Age of Dinosaurs (3 units)
Department: 
Biological Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XINTEGB 33
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Biological Science breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

In this lecture course, focus on dinosaurs from their appearance to extinction. Learn about the dinosaur skeleton, reconstructing dinosaurs, basic principles of evolution, classification and adaptation, and a survey of dinosaur types. You consider dinosaur reproduction, the question of dinosaur endothermy and the origin of birds. You also survey the other animals that coexisted with the dinosaurs to build a picture of the Mesozoic world. Lectures are often illustrated with slides. Three hours of lecture per week.

Molecular and Cell Biology 32—Introduction to Human Physiology (3 units)
Department: 
Biological Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XMCELLB 32
Prerequisite: 

One year of high school or college chemistry

Satisfies: 
Biological Science breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

You gain a comprehensive introduction to human cell biology by concentrating on basic mechanisms underlying human life processes, including cells and membranes; nerve and muscle function; cardiovascular, respiratory, renal and gastrointestinal physiology; and metabolism, endocrinology and reproduction. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Anthropology 1—Introduction to Biological Anthropology (4 units)
Department: 
Biological Science
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XANTHRO 1
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Either the Biological Science or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

An introductory course providing a comprehensive introduction to the field of Biological Anthropology.  It is a study of the processes and products of human evolution.  Topics we will cover include evolutionary history and theory, systematics, genetics, primate behavior and ecology, comparative primate anatomy, the primate fossil record with emphasis on the human lineage, human variation and adaptation, the origins of culture, and human biocultural evolution. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Historical Studies

Ethnic Studies XB21AC—A Comparative Survey of Racial and Ethnic Groups in the United States (4 units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XETHSTD
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Examine the historical experiences of European immigrants, African Americans and Latinos, emphasizing the themes of migration and economic change since the late-19th century. You will also learn about the experiences of Asian Americans, Native Americans and recently arrived immigrants in the context of the course themes. Throughout the course, discuss intragroup differences such as gender, socioeconomic stratification and cultural variation. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Linguistics 55AC—The American Languages (4 units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XLINGUI 55AC
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Using a linguistic view of the history, society and culture of the United States, explore the variety of languages spoken in our country and the issues surrounding them: language and ethnicity, politics of linguistic pluralism versus societal monolingualism, language and education, language shift, loss, retention and renewal. Languages include English (standard and nonstandard, African-American English), pidgins and creoles, Native American languages, Spanish, French, and immigrant languages from Asia and Europe. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

History 7B (AC)—The United States From Civil War to Present (4 units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XHISTOR 7B
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade.
Course Description: 

Examine the experiences and conflicts that comprise American society's history. You will be exposed to a wide range of historical actors and dialogues in order to understand the past, from the perspective of the men and women who experienced it and to gain some insight into the daily lives of Americans: work and leisure, cultures and ideologies, relations with one another, and the political and economic system under which they lived. Lectures and readings focus on the complex interplay among political, economic and cultural interests, and will examine, in particular depth, race relations, the laboring classes, reform movements, the interior of American lives, the changing conditions for success and survival in the culture Americans were shaping, and the emerging role of the United States as a world power. Three hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per week.

International Studies

Political Science 2—Introduction to Comparative Politics (4 units)
Department: 
International Studies
Department Abbreviation: 
XPOLSCI 2
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Either the International Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Gain a comparative study of countries and their different levels of economic and political development. Examine what they are like; how they came to be the way they are; and their particular expression in Western, Communist and Third-World settings. Topics include the nature of power, processes of politics, and the cultural and social forces that have given countries their distinctive identities. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Philosophy and Values

Philosophy 2—Individual Morality and Social Justice (4 units)
Department: 
Philosophy and Values
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XPHILOS 2
Prerequisite: 

None; however, this is a writing- and reading-intensive course, and students' writing skills should exceed the College Writing course level.

Satisfies: 
Either the Philosophy and Values or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Survey the basic questions of moral and political philosophy and some important attempts to answer them, with particular attention to topical issues (abortion, the ethics of eating animals and gay marriage, for example). What is the moral thing to do with respect to these issues? Is there a fact of the matter what the moral thing to do is, or does it depend on one's feelings, upbringing or culture? Why should we do what is morally right? Why should we tolerate alien moral beliefs and practices? What role should governments play? Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Philosophy 3—The Nature of Mind (4 units)
Department: 
Philosophy and Values
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XPHILOS 3
Prerequisite: 

None; however, this is a writing- and reading-intensive course, and students' writing skills should exceed the College Writing course level.

Satisfies: 
Philosophy and Values breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Gain an introduction to the philosophy of mind, and to philosophical reading, writing and thinking. What is it to have a mind? What kinds of properties are so-called mental properties? What is the connection between knowledge of one's own mental states and knowledge of the mental states of others? What is the connection between knowledge of one's own mental states and knowledge of the world around us? What are we doing when we explain people's behavior in terms of their beliefs, desires and other contenful states? You will also examine the ways in which the nature of our mental states can be said to depend on our relations to features of our environment. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Physical Science

Geography 30—The Ocean World (4 units)
Department: 
Biological Science
Physical Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XGEOG 30
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Either the Biological Science or the Physical Science category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Gain an introduction to the cultural and physical geography of the world's oceans. Topics include ecology of ocean biota and environments; history and geography of ocean peoples, cultures and resource use; problems confronting ocean peoples and environments; and new approaches to saving the oceans. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Astronomy 10—Introduction to General Astronomy (4 units)
Department: 
Physical Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XASTRON 10
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Physical Science breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

A description of modern astronomy with emphasis on the structure and evolution of stars, galaxies, and the Universe. Additional topics optionally discussed include quasars, pulsars, black holes, and extraterrestrial communication. A minimum of high school–level algebra and geometry is assumed, but equation solving and memorization are not emphasized. Most students are not physical science majors, and the emphasis is on understanding the skills used in astrophysics that are of interest to society. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Earth and Planetary Science (Geology) 80—Environmental Earth Sciences: Soils (3 units)
Department: 
Physical Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XEPS 80
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Physical Science breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

This course focuses on the processes on and in the earth that shape the environment. Humanity's use of land and oceans is examined based on an understanding of these processes.Three hours of lecture per week.

Chemistry 1A—General Chemistry (3 units)
Department: 
Physical Science
Department Abbreviation: 
XCHEM 1A
Prerequisite: 

None, but High School Chemistry recommended. Co-enrollment in a discussion section is required. Co-enrollment in XCHEM 1AL is recommended but not required.

Satisfies: 
Physical Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade.
Course Description: 

Stoichiometry of chemical reactions, quantum mechanical description of atoms, the elements and periodic table, chemical bonding, real and ideal gases, thermochemistry, introduction to thermodynamics and equilibrium, acid-base and solubility equilibria, introduction to oxidation-reduction reactions, introduction to chemical kinetics. Three hours of lecture, one hour of discussion, and zero-two hours of voluntary per week.

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Ethnic Studies XB21AC—A Comparative Survey of Racial and Ethnic Groups in the United States (4 units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XETHSTD
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Examine the historical experiences of European immigrants, African Americans and Latinos, emphasizing the themes of migration and economic change since the late-19th century. You will also learn about the experiences of Asian Americans, Native Americans and recently arrived immigrants in the context of the course themes. Throughout the course, discuss intragroup differences such as gender, socioeconomic stratification and cultural variation. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Linguistics 55AC—The American Languages (4 units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XLINGUI 55AC
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Using a linguistic view of the history, society and culture of the United States, explore the variety of languages spoken in our country and the issues surrounding them: language and ethnicity, politics of linguistic pluralism versus societal monolingualism, language and education, language shift, loss, retention and renewal. Languages include English (standard and nonstandard, African-American English), pidgins and creoles, Native American languages, Spanish, French, and immigrant languages from Asia and Europe. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Philosophy 2—Individual Morality and Social Justice (4 units)
Department: 
Philosophy and Values
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XPHILOS 2
Prerequisite: 

None; however, this is a writing- and reading-intensive course, and students' writing skills should exceed the College Writing course level.

Satisfies: 
Either the Philosophy and Values or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Survey the basic questions of moral and political philosophy and some important attempts to answer them, with particular attention to topical issues (abortion, the ethics of eating animals and gay marriage, for example). What is the moral thing to do with respect to these issues? Is there a fact of the matter what the moral thing to do is, or does it depend on one's feelings, upbringing or culture? Why should we do what is morally right? Why should we tolerate alien moral beliefs and practices? What role should governments play? Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Psychology 1—General Psychology (3 units)
Department: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XPSYCH 1
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Examine a representative sample of topics in psychology, including the operation of neurons and the brain; animal behavior; sensory and perceptual processes; obedience to authority; and theories of personality, mental disorders and psychotherapy. Topics also include the history of psychology (with brief readings from Plato, Darwin, James, Freud and Watson), recent ideas about the role of consciousness in cognition and computer modeling of cognitive processes. Two hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

History 7B (AC)—The United States From Civil War to Present (4 units)
Department: 
Historical Studies
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XHISTOR 7B
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and either the Historical Studies or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade.
Course Description: 

Examine the experiences and conflicts that comprise American society's history. You will be exposed to a wide range of historical actors and dialogues in order to understand the past, from the perspective of the men and women who experienced it and to gain some insight into the daily lives of Americans: work and leisure, cultures and ideologies, relations with one another, and the political and economic system under which they lived. Lectures and readings focus on the complex interplay among political, economic and cultural interests, and will examine, in particular depth, race relations, the laboring classes, reform movements, the interior of American lives, the changing conditions for success and survival in the culture Americans were shaping, and the emerging role of the United States as a world power. Three hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per week.

Philosophy 3—The Nature of Mind (4 units)
Department: 
Philosophy and Values
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XPHILOS 3
Prerequisite: 

None; however, this is a writing- and reading-intensive course, and students' writing skills should exceed the College Writing course level.

Satisfies: 
Philosophy and Values breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

Gain an introduction to the philosophy of mind, and to philosophical reading, writing and thinking. What is it to have a mind? What kinds of properties are so-called mental properties? What is the connection between knowledge of one's own mental states and knowledge of the mental states of others? What is the connection between knowledge of one's own mental states and knowledge of the world around us? What are we doing when we explain people's behavior in terms of their beliefs, desires and other contenful states? You will also examine the ways in which the nature of our mental states can be said to depend on our relations to features of our environment. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Geography 50AC—California (4 units)
Department: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XGEOG 50AC
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences, American Cultures
Course Description: 

California had been called "the great exception" and "America, only more so." Yet few of us pay attention to its distinctive traits and to its effects beyond our borders. California may be "a state of mind," but it is also the most dynamic place in the most powerful country in the world, and would be the 8th largest economy if it were a country. Its wealth has been built on mining, agriculture, industry, trade, and finance. Natural abundance and geographic advantage have played their parts, but the state's greatest resource has been its wealth and diversity of people, who have made it a center of technological and cultural innovation from Hollywood to Silicon Valley. Yet California has a dark side of exploitation and racialization.

Anthropology 1—Introduction to Biological Anthropology (4 units)
Department: 
Biological Science
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XANTHRO 1
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Either the Biological Science or Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade
Course Description: 

An introductory course providing a comprehensive introduction to the field of Biological Anthropology.  It is a study of the processes and products of human evolution.  Topics we will cover include evolutionary history and theory, systematics, genetics, primate behavior and ecology, comparative primate anatomy, the primate fossil record with emphasis on the human lineage, human variation and adaptation, the origins of culture, and human biocultural evolution. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Gender and Women's Studies 50AC—Gender in American Culture (3 units)
Department: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Also Fulfills AC Requirement
Department Abbreviation: 
XGWS 50AC
Prerequisite: 

None.

Satisfies: 
Both the American Cultures requirement and the Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade.
Course Description: 

A multi-disciplinary course designed to provide students with an opportunity to work with faculty investigating the topic gender in American culture. Three hours of lecture per week.

Class Description: The course attempts to problematize "gendered" identity constructs by analyzing writings of Native-American, African-American and Asian-American writers. It questions how shifting positionalities impact gender, class and race. It challenges these texts as mere narratives of exclusion and exploitation to acknowledge them as transforming identity politics and gendered subjectivity to invest the politics of survival in "between" worlds with a new meaning.

Global Studies 10B—Critical Issues in Global Studies (3 units)
Department: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department Abbreviation: 
XGLOBAL 10B
Prerequisite: 

None. 

Satisfies: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences breadth category if completed with a C− or better or a Passed grade.
Course Description: 

Global Studies 10B serves as an introduction to the Global Studies curriculum. Global Studies 10B introduces students to global issues through the lens of the humanities, such as art, literature, film, and culture. The topic of Global Studies 10B will vary from year to year, depending on the instructor. Students in each iteration of this course will learn about salient global interactions from a variety of cultural perspectives. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion section per week.

Class Description: Media and cinema in global cultures. In this course, we will study media and cinema as everyday stories deepening our relationship with global cultures and flows. We will study closely how visual storytelling affects our understanding of race, gender, health, immigration, justice, and other related issues in global cultures and politics.

Electives

Letters and Science 1—Exploring the Liberal Arts (2 units)
Department: 
Electives
Department Abbreviation: 
XL&S 1
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Electives do not fulfill University or breadth requirements, but are great opportunities to enrich your schedule in areas you find interesting.
Course Description: 

Get introduced to the intellectual landscape of the College of Letters and Science, revealing the underlying assumptions, goals and structure of a liberal arts education. Topics include the difference between the College of Letters and Science and the professional schools, the rationale behind the breadth requirement, the approaches and methodologies of each of the divisions in the college, and the benefits of engaging in research as an undergraduate. The ultimate goal of the course is to transform you into an informed participant in your educational experiences so that you can make the most of your years at Berkeley. One-and-a-half hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Rhetoric 2—Fundamentals of Public Speaking (2 units)
Department: 
Electives
Department Abbreviation: 
XRHETOR 2
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Electives do not fulfill University or breadth requirements, but are great opportunities to enrich your schedule in areas you find interesting.
Course Description: 

Gain help in establishing and developing basic competence in the skills required for effective oral presentations, whether prepared in advance or spontaneous. You cover formulating a clear communicative intent, basic principles of communication and theories of persuasion, organization of presentation material, delivery, use of visual aids and response to audience questions. You make six different oral presentations during the term, with ample opportunity for ungraded practice and coaching prior to evaluation. Three hours of class per week. This course is offered only on a Passed/Not Passed basis. Although this course does not satisfy a College of Letters and Science breadth requirement, units are granted.

Art 98—Symbolic and Practical: Art and Social Justice (2 Units)
Department: 
Electives
Department Abbreviation: 
XART 98
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Electives do not fulfill University or breadth requirements, but are great opportunities to enrich your schedule in areas you find interesting.
Course Description: 

Artists have long made works that address issues of justice, equity, freedom and oppression. These works, and the strategies artists employ, are frequently informed by, produced through or in dialogue with social movements that seek to alter the conditions of society. The relationship between art and social movements raises questions about what it means to do art and what it means to do social justice. In order to explore the overlaps, tensions, and distinctions between the symbolic and practical practices of artists and social movements, this course combines student experimentation, readings, videos, discussion and site visits throughout the San Francisco Bay Area.

African American Studies 98—Homegrown Hip-Hop (2 Units)
Department: 
Electives
Department Abbreviation: 
XAFRICA 98
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Electives do not fulfill University or breadth requirements, but are great opportunities to enrich your schedule in areas you find interesting.
Course Description: 

From its inception, Hip Hop has been (and continues to be) more than just a genre of music. Hip Hop has always served as an umbrella term encompassing art, music, dance, literature, identity, style, entrepreneurship and politics. This course will utilize an interactive and multi-media approach to engaging with Hip Hop Culture in the Bay Area. As the course will deal with contemporary Hip Hop culture in the Bay Area, it will also focus on the regional influences underpinning the Bay Area's distinct Hip-Hop landscape. We will also make it a point to deconstruct the multiple eras of Hip-Hop/rap in the Bay Area, and critically appraise the content contained in Bay Area Hip Hop records. It bears repeating, Hip-Hop culture is not only a source of entertainment within our everyday lives, but also a medium that analyzes/provides commentary regarding social, economic, political and cultural issues dealing with cultural identity, cultural genocide, misogyny, racism, classism, materialism, freedom of speech and freedom of sexuality. During the duration of this semester we will think critically, embrace debate, and delve into the study of Hip Hop culture. 

Ethnic Studies 197—Field Study in Community (2 units)
Department: 
Electives
Department Abbreviation: 
XETHSTUD 197
Prerequisite: 

None.

Course Description: 

Supervised community field study. Two hours of lecture per week.

Class Description: Field Study in Community: Creating change and reflecting on my role in Berkeley and in communities. This two-unit seminar on concepts of service, social justice, and community engagement allows students to incorporate their academic scholarship and personal experience. Field projects and guest speakers in the class provide opportunities for students to explore Berkeley’s rich history within social movements while reflecting on their calling and commitment to using their education to better society.

Your Math and Statistics Courses

You may have already fulfilled the L&S Quantitative Reasoning requirement, but your intended major(s) may require math courses. 

Mathematics 32—Precalculus (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XMATH 32
Examples of Intended Majors: 
Any major that requires Math 16A or Math 1A
Prerequisite: 

Three years of high school mathematics and at least a score of 560 on the SAT I Math portion. Email fpf@berkeley.edu if you need to take math but have scored below a 560 on the SAT I.

Satisfies: 
Quantitative Reasoning requirement if completed with a grade of C− or better. Some majors have specific grade requirements.
Course Description: 

This course is designed for students who wish to prepare for calculus. It covers exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometry, complex numbers, binomial theorem, conics and analytic geometry. Three hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per week.

Mathematics 16A—Analytic Geometry and Calculus (3 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XMATH 16A
Examples of Intended Majors: 
Business Administration (Haas), Architecture, Economics, Public Health, Environmental Sciences
Prerequisite: 

Three years of high school mathematics, including trigonometry, plus a satisfactory grade in one of the following: CEEB MAT test, an AP test, the UC/CSU math diagnostic exam or Math 32. It is strongly recommended that you take 16A only if you have already completed precalculus. Students will not receive credit for 16A after taking 1A. Two units of Math 16A may be used to remove a deficient grade in Math 1A.

Satisfies: 
Quantitative Reasoning requirement if completed with a grade of C− or better. Some majors have specific grade requirements. Math 16A (or equivalent) is required to continue on to Math 16B.
Course Description: 

Math 16A covers much of the same basic topics as Math 1A, but does not include in-depth calculus and does not prepare you to continue on to Match 53 or 54. Math 16A introduces integration, the fundamental theorem of calculus, areas in the plane and other applications of the definite integral. This course is intended for students in the life and social sciences whose programs require only one year of calculus.Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Mathematics 1A—Calculus (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XMATH 1A
Examples of Intended Majors: 
Physical Sciences, Engineering, Mathematics, Computer Sciences, Molecular and Cell Biology, Economics, Astronomy, Chemistry, Geology, Statistics
Prerequisite: 

Three-and-a-half years of high school mathematics, including trigonometry and analytic geometry, plus a satisfactory grade in one of the following: CEEB MAT test, an AP test, the UC/CSU math diagnostic test or Math 32. It is strongly recommended that you take 1A only if you have already completed precalculus.

Satisfies: 
Quantitative Reasoning requirement if completed with a grade of C− or better. Some majors have specific grade requirements. Math 1A (or equivalent) is required to continue on to Math 1B.
Course Description: 

Math 1A covers the topics of calculus of one variable, mainly with derivatives, and applications such as graphing and optimization. It introduces the idea of integration and applications such as volumes of revolution. Students are expected to understand some theorems and their proofs. This rigorous course emphasizes conceptual understanding and is intended for students in engineering and physical sciences. Three hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per week.

Topics Covered: 
Intuitive and precise limit definitions, continuity, definition of the derivative, shortcut rules for finding derivatives, product rule, quotient rule, chain rule, implicit differentiation, related rates, linear approximations and differentials, mean value theorem, L'Hopital's rule, curve sketching, optimization, Newton's Method, definition of Riemann integral, Fundamental Theorem of Calculus (Parts 1 and 2), natural logarithm defined as an integral, area between two curves, volumes of solids of revolution.
Skills Needed: 
  • Facility with a scientific calculator or graphing calculator may be required
    • Ability to determine the value of a complicated expression using a scientific or graphing calculator
  • Facility with fractions
    • Ability to simplify rational expressions and solve rational equations
  • Facility with algebra
    • Ability to solve linear equations
    • Ability to solve quadratic equations by factoring, completing the square and using the quadratic formula
    • Ability to solve a linear system of equations
  • Facility with graphing
    • Ability to identify and plot points on the Cartesian plane
    • Ability to graph lines
  • Facility with exponential and logarithmic functions
    • Familiarity with e and natural logarithms
    • Ability to simplify expressions containing logarithms
    • Ability to solve logarithmic equations
      • Ability to graph exponential and logarithmic functions
  • Facility with trigonometry
    • Familiarity with radian measure
    • Ability to compute trigonometric functions of simple angles
    • Ability to use the Pythagorean Theorem
    • Ability to solve triangle using the Law of Sines or the Law of Cosines
    • Knowledge of addition formula for sine and cosine
Mathematics 1B—Calculus (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XMATH 1B
Examples of Intended Majors: 
Physical Sciences, Engineering, Mathematics, Computer Sciences, Molecular and Cell Biology, Economics, Astronomy, Chemistry, Geology, Statistics
Prerequisite: 

Math 1A or equivalent coursework; please check Assist.org or with the Office of Undergraduate Admissions to make sure your coursework is equivalent to UC Berkeley's Math 1A.

Satisfies: 
Quantitative Reasoning requirement if completed with a grade of C− or better. Some majors have specific grade requirements. Math 1B is required to continue on to Math 53 or 54, and is recommended to continue on to Math 55.
Course Description: 

Math 1B is a continuation of Math 1A. It involves integration techniques and applications and introduces infinite series and first- and second-order differential equations and their uses. It is intended for students with majors in engineering, math and some sciences. Three hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per week.

Statistics 2—Introduction to Statistics (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XSTAT 2
Examples of Intended Majors: 
Psychology, Political Economy, Development Studies, Legal Studies, Nutritional Science: Dietetics, Nutritional Science: Physiology and Metabolism
Prerequisite: 

None

Satisfies: 
Quantitative Reasoning requirement if completed with a grade of C− or better. Some majors have specific grade requirements. Stat 2 does NOT fulfill prerequisites for the economics major, statistics major or the Haas Undergraduate Business Program.
Course Description: 

This course introduces basic concepts of probability and statistical inference and covers standard methods for making inferences about populations from information contained in sample data: the methods used in sample surveys, opinion polls, research studies and industry. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Mathematics 10A—Methods of Mathematics: Calculus, Statistics, and Combinatorics (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XMATH 10A
Examples of Intended Majors: 
Integrative Biology, Molecular and Cell Biology, other life sciences
Prerequisite: 

Three and one-half years of high school math, including trigonometry and analytic geometry, plus a satisfactory grade in one of the following: CEEB MAT test, an AP test, the UC/CSU math diagnostic test or Math 32. It is strongly recommended that you take 1A only if you have already completed precalculus.

Satisfies: 
Quantitative Reasoning requirement if completed with a grade of C− or better. Some majors have specific grade requirements. Math 10A is required to continue on to Math 10B.
Course Description: 

Intended for majors in the life sciences. Introduction to differential and integral calculus of functions of one variable, ordinary differential equations, and matrix algebra and systems of linear equations. Three hours of lecture and three hours of discussion per week. 

Reading and Composition

You may have already fulfilled the L&S R&C requirement, though most freshmen have not. You should complete the R&C requirement by the end of your freshman year or, at the latest, by the end of your sophomore year.

Reading and Composition R1A

English R1A—Reading and Composition (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XENGLIS R1A
Prerequisite: 

Completion of the UC Entry-level Writing Requirement

Satisfies: 
The first-half (Part A) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better.
Course Description: 

Training in writing expository prose. Instruction in expository writing in conjunction with reading literature. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections
English R1A—Section 1
21st Century American Literature

21st c. American Literature is all around you. We'll discuss a novel, see a play (Suzan-Lori Parks' White Noise), and we'll also study songs, TV series, short stories, plus do detailed analyses of your own 750 word essays, which are also our course texts.

English R1A—Section 3, Section 7
Daring Greatly

We will look at three very different texts--a dialogue by Plato, a book about Hmong people in central California, a science-fiction novel set on a world where gender only happens once a month--and ask how the characters act courageously to meet and deal with great challenges. Essays, quizzes, speeches, rereadings, and lots of discussion.

English R1A—Section 4
Finding Meaning Through Self-Awareness: The Perennial Heroic Struggle

Hamlet's "To be or not to be" is among the most universally known and quoted lines from literature, and the timeless existential question he poses confronts us all. In this class we will explore, along with a number of other themes, how the difficult battle with oneself can win what almost everyone is searching for--meaning.

English R1A—Section 5, Section 11
Writer’s Block (and Other Sometimes Hidden Obstacles to Academic Ambitions and Personal Dreams)

In this class, you will develop college-level critical thinking, writing, and class discussion skills while you read poems, autobiographies, short stories, and novels about ambition, achievement, and about managing familial or cultural expectations while staying true to personal dreams and learning how to stay out of your own way.

English R1A—Section 6, Section 10
Imagining the Modern World

What is art today? A giant puppy made of flowers? A fake Prada store in the Texas desert? We’ll address some challenges to defining contemporary art and understanding its role in our lives. We’ll investigate specific artists and movements as test cases, and will use what we learn to unpack some works of fiction, too. No prior knowledge of art history is necessary.

English R1A—Section 9
Identity as Performance

People often say that our actions speak louder than words. We connect with our immediate socio-political circumstances, which then determine the performances of our identities. Personal identity is thus not an unchangeable idea, but its performance is constantly in flux depending on the context. We will examine five plays in this course focusing on the construction of identity through performance.

English R1A—Section 12
Migrant Lives

In our time, unprecedented numbers of people are living lives in motion. War, climate change, social upheaval, and economic insecurity push migrants from the places of their birth; hope pulls them toward new points on the map. Together we will read and write about narratives that emerge from and bear witness to migrant lives.

English R1A—Section 13
“Forget it Jake, it’s Chinatown”: Chinatown and the Culture of Exclusion

Taking Chinatown as a case study, this course will explore what literary and filmic representations of racialized urban spaces reveal about American politics and culture. We will consider the formal strategies used to construct the geography of Chinatown and how Chinatown is deployed as a key site for popular imaginations about urban crime, poverty, race, and sexuality.

English R1A—Section 14, Section 15
Explorers, Monsters, and Magicians

This class will help you develop sharp writing and thinking skills that you’ll use throughout college and beyond. Discover your voice by writing about texts that ask and answer questions like: What powers or risks go with living as an explorer, an outsider, or even a monster? How far should we go for the dreams and inventions we create?

College Writing R1A—Accelerated Reading and Composition (6 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XCOLWRI R1A
Prerequisite: 

Only for students who have not passed the UC Analytical Writing Placement Exam or have not satisfied the Entry-Level Writing requirement. 

Satisfies: 
Both the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement and the first-half (Part A) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

An intensive, accelerated course satisfying concurrently the requirements of the UC Entry Level Writing Requirement and the first half of Reading and Composition. Readings will include imaginative, expository and argumentative texts representative of the range of those encountered in the undergraduate curriculum and will feature authors from diverse social and cultural backgrounds and perspectives. Instruction in writing a range of discourse forms and in the revision of papers. Six hours of class per week.

Sections 
College Writing R1A—Section 1
The Bay Area

In our class, we will use personal experience and our fiction and nonfiction readings about the Bay Area to question the role of place in our lives. We will read authors of many different perspectives in order to establish our own confident academic voices, and we will value the process of writing alongside its products.

College Writing R1A—Section 2, Section 4
Human Fallibility in the 21st Century

This course will focus on the technology age and its influence on human behavior. Through close readings of essays and fiction, and through class discussion, we will explore the idea of identity, perception, and character in the 21st century. In the process we will discuss the increasing need for speed in our everyday lives and its advantages and disadvantages.

College Writing R1A—Section 3
Social Justice Movements in the Bay Area

The Bay Area has and long and abundant history of engagement with social justice beyond the Free Speech Movement. We will explore social conditions and the individuals that inspired and nurtured social justice movements in the Bay Area through literature, journalism, and film.

College Writing R1A—Section 5, Section 6
Human Rights and Creative Resistance

Imagine the ideal world you’d like to live in. How do people treat each other in this world? In this course, you’ll deepen your understanding of human rights and current global issues through the close examination of fiction, graphic memoir, essays, multimedia, primary documents, and rich discussion. We’ll explore how people challenge systemic injustice and promote citizen empowerment creatively.

College Writing R1A—Section 7
The Dilemmas that Define Us

This intensive reading and writing course will examine a variety of dilemmas --ethical, personal, educational--that face us. We will read and write about issues using a diverse array of rhetorical strategies. Through critical reading, analytical writing, and class discussion, we will explore dilemmas that not only affect our society, but also ourselves.

Rhetoric R1A—The Craft of Writing (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XRHETOR R1A
Prerequisite: 

Completion of the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement or UC Analytical Writing Placement Exam

Satisfies: 
The first-half (Part A) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

Learn the principles of argumentative writing and emphasizes close readings of texts that reveal their rhetorical structure and intended audience. You learn to identify and interpret a text's thesis and intention and make compelling arguments for your position using textual evidence. Three hours of lecture per week.

Section
Rhetoric R1A—Section 1
The Reader as Archaeologist: Rhetorically Excavating Issues

Become explorers excavating issues from medical care to the justice system. Can you distinguish opinion from argument? Back your interpretation with textual evidence? Persuade a skeptical reader/audience without resorting demagoguery? We focus on classical structure coupled with engaging style. This seminar-style class engages you in reasoned discourse. Strengthen your critical thinking, writing, and speaking that define university-level advancement.

Comparative Literature R1A—English Composition in Connection With the Reading of World Literature (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XCOMLIT R1A
Prerequisite: 

Completion of the UC Entry Level Writing Requirement or UC Analytical Writing Placement Exam

Satisfies: 
The first-half (Part A) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better.
Course Description: 

Expository writing based on analysis of selected masterpieces of ancient and modern literature. You will come to understand the readings through class discussion and writing and revising papers that analyze the readings in academic argument form. Learn to read and write at the analytical and critical levels required at Berkeley. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections
Comparative Literature R1A—Section 1
Lost and Found in the American City

As cultural, political, and economic centers, cities can foster connection, creativity, and belonging. What is lost or pushed into possible oblivion in and by the city? We’ll explore the landscapes of four of America’s most iconic cities—New York, Mexico City, Buenos Aires, and Los Angeles—and consider the ways in which urban spaces are experienced, constructed, and imagined as spaces where some get lost, others found.

Comparative Literature R1A—Section 2
Writing Eros: Literature and Romantic Love

In this course we’ll hone our skills at reading, writing, listening, speaking, and thinking while studying texts that probe the nature of romantic love and challenge conventional beliefs about it. Readings may include Alain de Botton’s On Love, Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Chekhov’s “The Lady with the Little Dog,” a selection from Plato’s Symposium, Ang Lee’s film Sense and Sensibility, and poems by Sappho, Edna St. Vincent Millay, and Elizabeth Barrett Browning.

Reading and Composition R1B

English R1B—Reading and Composition (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XENGLIS R1B
Prerequisite: 

Completion of both the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement and the first-half (Part A) of the Reading and Composition requirement

Satisfies: 
The second-half (Part B) of the reading and composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

Training in writing expository prose. Further instruction in expository writing in conjunction with reading literature. Three hours of lecture per week.

Sections
English R1B—Section 1
Carceral Geographies

The term 'carceral' is used to refer to anything that pertains to prisons and imprisonment. In this course, we will examine the spaces of imprisonment from the border to internment camps to prisons. We will look at how the movement of people through space is shaped and controlled through carceral technologies.

English R1B—Section 3, Section 5
Dystopia, Utopia, or Reality?

If utopia describes an ideal society or a “good place,” then dystopia describes its opposite: an unjust and cruel society, a bad place, or an apocalyptic world. What can literature teach us about utopian and dystopian elements in our own worlds?

English R1B—Section 4
Journeys

In this course we will explore literature not only from different countries, and from different genres (the epic poem, the experimental novel), but we’ll also journey chronologically through different historical epochs, reading in each.

English R1B—Section 6
Things Fall Apart

Contemporary life Is often experienced as fragmenting people’s sense of self and their sense of community. We will study how this experience is articulated in recent American fiction and consider whether and how writing fiction can counter this sense of fragmentation.

English R1B—Section 7, Section 8
Crisis and Catharsis

Humans need stories almost as much as we need food, especially when we’re growing up. Stories can be fun or romantic. But many memorable works of fiction capture tragedies, personal or historical, better than nonfiction can. This class will explore how writers imaginatively transform personal crises into stories that inspire us, even if they disturb us.

English R1B—Section 10
Life on the Hyphen

This course is about life in the Americas. It’s about life that beckons, it’s about a life that promises, it’s about a life that often fails—it’s about your in this country, your life-on-the-hyphen. We read a variety of literary texts to better understand the complexities and nuances of navigating our own lives on the hyphen.

Legal Studies R1B—Reading and Composition in Connection With the Law as a Social Institution (4 units)
Department Abbreviation: 
XLEGALS R1B
Prerequisite: 

Completion of both the UC Entry-Level Writing Requirement and the first-half (Part A) of the Reading and Composition requirement.

Satisfies: 
The second-half (Part B) of the Reading and Composition requirement if completed with a C− or better
Course Description: 

Develop your skills in critical reading, writing and analysis, and complete a series of essays culminating in a research paper relating to law, legal actors and legal institutions. Emphasis is placed on the process of writing, including developing research questions, constructing an argument and revising for content and style. Three hours of lecture per week.

Section
Legal Studies R1B—Section 1

This course examines racial and gender inequalities in the American property law system, from the past to the present. Case studies include slavery, the gender wage gap, and the housing crisis. As a result of this course, students can expect to hone their critical reading skills, express their own arguments clearly, and develop their own research projects.

Main Campus Electives Snippet

Approved Main Campus Electives

FPF students are welcome to enroll in certain approved 1-2 unit electives on the main campus. These courses are also referred to as "enrichment opportunities." They do not fulfill college or major requirements, and are intended to supplement students' core courses.

Approved Course Categories

Berkeley Connect: Berkeley Connect matches undergraduates with an experienced graduate student pursuing a PhD at Berkeley who will be their mentor for the semester. To sign up, students enroll in a Berkeley Connect seminar.

DeCal Courses: The Democratic Education at Cal (DeCal) Program is an aggregate of student-run courses. Students create and facilitate their own classes on a variety of subjects!

Music Performance Ensembles: The Music Department offers a number of performance ensembles including African Music, Jazz & Improvised Music, University Chorus & Chamber Chorus, Symphony Orchestra, and more!

Physical Education: The Physical Education (P.E.) Program offers a variety of courses in Dance, Fitness, Aquatics, Team and Individual Sports, and Martial Arts from beginning through advanced levels.

ROTC: Courses required by Army ROTC, Air Force ROTC, and NROTC.

Theme Housing: Students who live in Theme Housing take a for-credit seminar course associated with their theme community.

Undergraduate Research Apprentice Program: The Undergraduate Research Apprentice Program (URAP) gives undergraduate students the opportunity to work with UC Berkeley professors on research projects. The program helps students to gain access to the work faculty do outside of the classroom, and develop their research skills by contributing to the faculty mentors’ projects. Students in any college and any class level are welcome to apply, although they may not be qualified for every project.

Individual Course Approvals

In addition to the types of electives listed above, FPF students are able to take certain elective courses within academic departments on the main campus. Read below for our current list of approved courses:

  • BIOENG 26
  • CHEM 32
  • Computer Science:
    • All 1-2 unit, lower division (number 99 or lower) CS courses
    • Exceptions: CS 88 and CS 24 are not approved. CS courses worth more than 2 units are not approved. 
  • CS 195
  • EPS 199
  • FRENCH 13
  • FRENCH 14
  • HUM (Humanities) 20
  • HUNGARI (Hungarian) 100
  • IB 77A
  • LS 1 (Main Campus sections)
  • LS 5
  • LS 10
  • MUSIC 20A
  • MUSIC 140
  • POLSCI 179
  • STAT 33A
  • THEATER 66
  • UGBA C5
  • UGBA 98/198
  • UGBA Special Topics courses (click link for detailed course descriptions for Fall 2019)
    • UGBA 96
    • UGBA 135
    • UGBA 157
    • UGBA 190T
    • UGBA 190D
    • UGBA 191L
    • UGBA 192E
    • UGBA 192N
    • UGBA 192T
    • UGBA 195T
    • UGBA 196
  • UGIS 82

Other 1-2 unit elective courses will be considered on a case-by-case basis. Students should contact their FPF advisor for questions about any other enrichment opportunities which fall outside of the FPF core curriculum.